Latest Blog Posts

by Jose Solis

8 Jun 2015

Out of all the famous sitcoms from the ‘90s, The Nanny might just be the most underrated. With nostalgia for the last decade of the 20th century being exploited in fashion, music, and other art forms, it seems almost conspicuous that Fran Drescher’s CBS show doesn’t get more mentions. Perhaps its self indulgent camp, and the unique qualities of its leading lady—truly one of the boldest casting decisions made in any network television series—more often than not have reduced it to a curio. In part, this must have something to do with the fact that the show has remained largely unattainable since it went off the air in 1999. The Nanny still can be seen in syndication (it was rightfully acquired by LGBT cable channel Logo in 2011) but with the way viewers consume television, changing so drastically in the past few years, the fact that The Nanny isn’t available on any streaming service has left it into semi-obscurity.

by Samantha Cass

15 Apr 2015

By now we know that there have been several “self-styled” kings, and many that have claimed the rights to Game of Thrones’ kingdom of Westeros. Whether you have read all of George R.R. Martin’s books to date, or are only a fan of the television series, we have been subjected to a parade of aspiring leaders that all feel they have a claim to the Iron Throne.

But of these wannabes, which of these actually would make a good ruler? Which of them actually has a true and valid claim? Which of these people would avid readers and watchers of the Game of Thrones universe actually like to see sitting atop the Iron Throne?

by Evan Sawdey

16 Feb 2015

In case you somehow missed it, Jon Stewart has announced that sometime in 2015, he will leave The Daily Show, the trademark faux-news comedy program he commandeered from Craig Kilborn and transformed into a cultural powerhouse whose format is often imitated but truly, never bettered. “Did I die?” Stewart asked on the 11 February broadcast the day after his announcement, stunned at the outpouring of sadness on social media regarding his decision. Indeed, reading tale after tale of writers and young Americans who became politically active or went out and pursued degrees because of what Stewart has done is nothing short of incredible.

by J.M. Suarez

25 Feb 2014

The premature cancellation of great TV shows is, sadly, nothing new, as shows like My So-Called Life, Freaks and Geeks, and Firefly can attest. Yet it continues to happen, season after season. Low ratings, high concepts, and plain old bad timing are just a few reasons why some shows never get a chance to grow past one season.

Unfortunately, some shows seem destined for cancellation right away, regardless of critical acclaim or the support of small, fanatical groups of fans. Below are seven shows that not only were cancelled too soon, but may have also been overlooked as excellent one-season wonders.

by J.M. Suarez

14 Oct 2013

Dexter's morning juice.

As iconic as Mary Tyler Moore throwing her hat in the air, or a day in the life of Laverne and Shirley, or even the Huxtables dancing through the years, opening credits can be as memorable as the shows they introduce. Opening themes have varied from early graphic representations, to catchy, saccharine sweet jingles, to the minimalist flashings of title cards often seen in more current series. 

With shows like Lost and Breaking Bad perfecting the latter, and the struggle to gain precious seconds per episode, traditional opening credits have somewhat fallen out of fashion. Fortunately, there are still some series that recognize the importance of these credits in setting tone and introducing an audience to a show. The following nine current television programs (in no particular order) offer a wide range of successful and often visually arresting openers.

//Mixed media

Considering Twitter: An Interview with App Artist Nora Reed

// Moving Pixels

"Twitter is a place where bots prevail. And where they don't rule, people, acting like bots, rule. This uneasy person-bot rapprochement offers a fertile space for artistic exploration.

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