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by Jessy Krupa

8 Feb 2016


Last year’s Super Bowl, with over 120 million viewers, was the most-watched event in the history of television. In recent years, the big game has expanded into a sort of non-denominational holiday, in which there’s something for nearly everybody. But how did this year’s game, the 50th anniversary of the Super Bowl, fare? Read on to find out.

CBS’ coverage began at 1 PM CST with “Super Bowl Today”, their name for four hours of interviews, sportscaster analysis, trivia, and occasional on-field musical performances from artists as diverse as Sam Hunt and Seal.

by Jessy Krupa

8 Feb 2016


This past Sunday marked the 50th anniversary of the Super Bowl, but the popularity of the Super Bowl ad—a memorable, attention-grabbing commercial that advertisers pay massive amounts of money for—is a relatively recent phenomenon.

You could easily say that this year’s offerings were among the worst yet, with too many ad-makers cobbling together the same cliches of past successes (celebrity cameos, major special effects, cute animals, etc.) in ways that felt unoriginal and boring.

Still there were some commercials that probably put a smile on your face, so here is PopMatters countdown of the five best in show.

by Cynthia Fuchs

22 Oct 2012


“There’s fans, then there’s Kansas fans, then there’s Josh,” says Daymion Mardel. He’s Josh Swade’s friend, according to his credit in There’s No Place Like Home, and his description frames the story of Josh’s efforts to bring James Naismith’s original “Rules of Basketball” to Kansas University. Because Naismith coached and taught at KU for 40 years, Josh reasons, the Allen Fieldhouse is the document’s rightful home.

by Cynthia Fuchs

21 Aug 2012


“When do you sleep? You know, who needs it?” Jon Gruden’s first words to Bryant Gumbel on this week’s Real Sports. advised that getting up at 3:15am every morning to look at game film and prepare for work, Gruden agrees. “Yeah, it’s probably not wise at times, probably not normal,” he says, looking serious for a moment before he smiles. “But it’s my rhythm, it’s the beat that I go to.”

by Cynthia Fuchs

1 May 2012


“You could go in any direction, fast or slow as you wanted, fighting the wind if you felt like it, just on the strength of your feet and the courage of your lungs.” Jesse Owens’ description of running is surely poetic. Yet even as he found in running a means to express himself, to assert his independence and brilliance, the world around him remained unjust and odious. Jesse Owens—premiering on PBS’ American Experience on 1 May—recalls that world, as well as the athlete’s singular resistance to such injustice. It’s helpful to recall this dynamic now, at a time when athletes typically don’t take on such responsibility. As Laurens Grant’s elegant documentary points out, the responsibility was tremendous, as he traveled with the US Olympic team to the 1936 Olympics in Berlin. The bare bones of the outcome are well known now: Owens won four gold medals and Hitler refused to shake his hand. But the backstories to Owens’ triumphs on the track may be less familiar. And these stories, even those noted briefly here, demonstrate the complexity of the situations for Owens, the many “directions” he had to go, and the many winds he had to fight.

See PopMattersreview.

Watch Jesse Owens Preview on PBS. See more from American Experience.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Culture Belongs to the Alien in 'Spirits of Xanadu'

// Moving Pixels

"The symbols that the artifact in Spirits of Xanadu uses are esoteric -- at least for the average Western gamer. It is Chinese culture reflected back at us through the lens of alien understanding.

READ the article