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by Jessy Krupa

22 Nov 2016


Billie (Lisa Barry) offers to take Mary back to heaven.

“Was that why you spent the entire ride up here telling me in extreme, excruciating detail how you killed Hitler, but you neglected to mention the fact that your mom is back from the dead?”
—Jody Mills

Tonight’s episode of Supernatural featured two characters from the show’s past and a few new additions that we might see again in the future, but the plot was wrapped up so speedily that the whole thing just seemed like a missed opportunity. All in all, it continued season 12’s pattern of great character development and an interesting season-wide arc, but with half-baked, quickly resolved weekly plots.

by Jessy Krupa

14 Nov 2016

A resurrected Hitler is thrilled by
the possibilities of Twitter to gather new followers.

Supernatural has an illustrious history of weekly monsters, but this week’s episode dealt with an especially unusual villain: Adolf Hitler. It leads to the question of whether or not imagining an actual person—particularly one who caused as much death and damage as Hitler—as a horror fantasy is or isn’t in bad taste. Despite the gore and violence that usually comes with horror movies and shows, there’s a certain lightness that comes with the adult realization that imaginary creatures such as vampires, ghosts, werewolves, zombies, and the like don’t actually exist.

Horror movies about Hitler and Nazis, however, aren’t unusual (ranging from the laughably ridiculous They Saved Hitler’s Brain to more recent fare like Dead Snow), and many horror characters are loosely based on actual, often tragic events (such as how Dracula was inspired by the bloody war exploits and reign of Vlad the Impaler, or how the bacteria-related death of an archaeologist led to the idea of The Mummy‘s ancient Egyptian curses.) Regardless, given Supernatural‘s history of mashing up pop culture, ancient myths, religious lore, and just plain ridiculousness, no one should really be shocked by “The One You’ve Been Waiting For”.

by Jessy Krupa

8 Nov 2016


Gail Peterson (Christina Carlisi) channels Margaret White in the latest episode.

This week’s episode of Supernatural is the last one to air before Election Day, and as random as that may seem, it might be easy to see some political symbolism in the plot. The major point of “American Nightmare”, not to mention season twelve in general (so far), however, seems to be dedicated to exploring the concept of family.

At the beginning of the episode, Dean (Jensen Ackles) texts Mary (Samantha Smith), asking if she was okay and whether or not he should still call her “Mom”. He gets an answer at the end of the episode, when she writes that she hadn’t seen her messages because she needed to buy a cell phone charger and, most importantly, that she’ll always be both his and Sam’s mother. Isn’t it a little odd, though, that she didn’t actually call, just because, in typical mom fashion, she could then hear their voices? It seems a little suspicious to me, considering that there are British Men of Letters bent on kidnapping and torture, and possibly Lucifer himself, still on the loose?

by Jessy Krupa

31 Oct 2016


“It’s been months, months! since we tried to kill each other.”
—Crowley

Supernatural, which began as a show about two brothers devoted to “saving people, hunting things”, has grown to be quite the ensemble piece, with a frequently changing roster of angels, demons, supernatural entities, friends, and family members rounding out the cast. Tonight’s episode, however, hearkened back to the beginning, with most of the action focusing on one character, Mary Winchester (Samantha Smith).

by Jessy Krupa

25 Oct 2016


“Well, we should call the internet and find out as much as we can about these people.”
—Mary Winchester

What a weird way to open an episode! Supernatural viewers were likely wondering just what the heck was going on in the first few minutes of this week’s episode, as it opened with the rather unlikely sight of Sam Winchester (Jared Padalecki) and Lady Antonia Bevell (Elizabeth Blackmore) in bed together. Just as we’re starting to wonder if Sam’s bad taste in women had struck again—in case we’d forgotten, Bevell did point out later on that one of his last serious girlfriends was Ruby the demon (Genevieve Cortese)—the show reveals this was all just a drug-induced hallucination (and an excuse to show a shirtless Sam). Bevell threatened to torture a lot of characters tonight, so it’s not surprising that fans of the show generally dislike her character. The events of the rest of the episode, however, certainly seem to hint that she won’t be much of a recurring character.

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