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by Kate Dries

18 Mar 2011

Ah, pilot season: that happy time of year when we get the possibility of being relinquished from the horrors of the television shows we’re slogging through right now (such as Rules of Engagement; one can only hope that show will be booted off the roster one of these thousands of years). This year is no exception, but there might be even more to look forward to; there’s a particular good crop of actors circling the pilots in talks right now. Additionally, a great number of them are being led by impressive women, thus further proving the argument that television is the place for the ladies who want the ripest of parts. Let’s take a look at the potential pilots and the women who may head them.

by Jessy Krupa

5 Oct 2010

Before the premiere episode debuted, the network pushed a massive publicity campaign, which included heavy advertising and special preview opportunities. This summer, select subscribers of Entertainment Weekly magazine in which DVDs of the pilot were sent along with branded merchandise in order to get positive word-of-mouth going for the series.

Despite all that, Lone Star’s first two episodes only averaged at about four million viewers, thus leading FOX to replace the show with new episodes of Lie To Me. (Human Target will then be moved to Wednesday nights.)

A network spokesman confirmed that no more episodes will be filmed, but there are four more unseen episodes left. It’s likely that these episodes will be shown during either the mid-season (around December or January) or next summer, if at all.

Lone Star was the first cancellation of the Fall 2010 season. In what also seems like bad news for FOX, their ratings powerhouse House has seen a significant drop in viewers and another one of their new series, Running Wilde, is another candidate for cancellation.

by Lynnette Porter

31 Aug 2010

Sam Beckett may never have returned home, but Comic-Con fans welcomed news that he may yet leap into the future again. Scott Bakula, who played the earnest do-gooder on Quantum Leap, announced yet another proposed movie based on the once-popular series. Leapers (QL fans) briefly rejoiced, although this is not the first time series’ creator Donald Bellisario (also well known for NCIS, JAG, and Magnum, P.I.) has tried to launch a QL movie. This time, however, Bakula sounded confident that a movie will be made, even if the deal has not yet been finalized.

What made the highly publicized announcement bittersweet for long-time fans, many who faithfully watched episodes from 1989 to 1993, is the proposed casting. Bakula gamely noted that his leaping days are over. Although he and co-star Dean Stockwell (Al Calavicci) most likely would have roles, they would not star in the movie. In fact, the Comic-Con crowd was left wondering whether someone else might play Sam or if the character, too, might be retired.

by Jessy Krupa

27 Aug 2010

This is the time of year when all the broadcast networks (ABC, CBS, NBC, FOX, and the CW) put out those cheap, cheesy “preview” specials. They often broadcast them at odd times, and mostly focus on what seems to be the worst of what they have to offer. Consider what’s broadcast here as an improved version of what you’ll get on the tube. Following are previews of the new shows that will be airing during the weekends, along with a little background information and some speculation on how long they might last.

by Lynnette Porter

23 Aug 2010

As the hours of the LOST scrolled by, so did the list of auction items and the constant stream of ever-higher bids. If nothing else, this final official LOST event makes a statement about fans as consumers of popular culture, even in a sluggish economy.

Like many long-time LOST fans, I followed the official memorabilia auction online on August 21, the first day of the two-day, multi-hour sale. The view from the auction floor must have been much more invigorating and illuminating. After all, the auction site encouraged ticket buyers, whether they registered as bidders or simply wanted to browse, to come early to peruse the merchandise. Visitors could have their photo taken with wreckage from Oceanic 815, and Kate or Hurley impersonators could participate in costume contests. The on-site activities offered much more than an auction, although that itself was entertainment. The auction “show” featured fast and furious bidding, a bid war or two, and the adrenaline-fueled anticipation of exactly how high those bids would go.

Much of that excitement was necessarily lost in the shift from in person to online, but the view from the screen became riveting in its own way and provided a very different interpretation of the auction’s cultural significance. Images of upcoming items slowly queued up the left side of the screen, with the memorabilia currently up for bid taking center stage one final time. A rapidly changing list of bids scrolled along the right side of the screen. When the bids—marked Floor or Internet to indicate the source of competing offers—slowed for a few seconds, yellow warning signs reminded prospective buyers to hurry. Another prompt indicated that the current lot was about to be closed.

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2016: Executing 'The Deed'

// Moving Pixels

"It's just so easy to kill someone in a video game that it's surprising when a game makes murder difficult.

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