Latest Blog Posts

by Devin Mainville

16 Dec 2010

National Geographic’s reputation for gorgeous photography and compelling historical documentation continues with this tome showcasing human history. Eyewitness to History illustrates the past through the eyes of the people who lived it, be they figures of importance or mere cogs in the machine. Each chapter contains a milestone document such as Hammurabi’s Code and Luther’s 95 Theses. Even the writings of everyday citizens reveal tremendous detail about the way of life, customs and practices of people at any given time.

From prehistory to today, the book’s timeline takes us for an epic journey through an ever evolving landscape. It makes one wonder how our time and place will be depicted to future generations.

by shathley Q

14 Dec 2010

There are many hearts to William Gibson’s Zero History. Part of the pure, undiluted joy you will experience when you read Zero History is uncovering those secret, sacred hearts for yourself. Like kernels, germs, gems, you’ll dig them out from the fertile earth of the novel’s imaginative life.

You’ll sense that wavering dread that Hollis Henry (retired lead singer and erstwhile journalist) experiences when Hubertus Bigend, corporate monolith and psychic vampire, goads her into tracking down the mind behind Gabriel Hounds denim fashion. Near the novel’s beginning, it will begin to feel like that part where the dream of the horror movie is just about to become too much. You’ll sense that hopeful wonder of a world that may yet be righted, when Mere speaks of the Budo-Christian disconnect between the world consumers see in glossy magazines, and the horror-sacrifice needed to make that world from the lives of poor, hungry women sleeping on apartment floors.

If you’re like me, you’ll find these gems moving through the book reading at breakneck pace—but it won’t feel like that at all. It will feel slow and rhythmic, like the slow beating pulse of the planet that syncs with human brainwaves at about 7.8Hz. You’ll smuggle Zero History into your daily life, you’ll read it on your daily commute across the bay, or deep enough under the city to not see natural light, or in the elevator, on the way to your next meeting. The book will become a device. You’ll set aside the iPad, iPhone, you’ll unplug. Time will unfurl…

by Devin Mainville

13 Dec 2010

This follow up to the insanely popular, Creative Cursing is a flip-style book that allows you to randomly choose a unique, southern themed insult, and far more colorful than the ol’ “crazy varment” standard.

Such soon to be classics like “scalawag sniffer”, “skunk wacker”, “wench chunks”, and “taint donkey” are but a few of the names you might come across in this book. Imagine the look on the face of the insultee as he tries to figure out what you just said… “What was that about my mama?” The possibilities are endless, as are the laughs. This is the perfect gift to stuff in the stocking of your favorite inappropriate cousin.

by J.C. Sciaccotta

1 Dec 2010

Ever get the itch to perform Shakespeare via finger puppets on miniature dioramas in your living room? Well today is your lucky day! May I introduce Masterpuppet Theatre, a “unique” kit of 60 finger puppets and 12 backgrounds featuring the Bard’s most famous characters, allowing you to perform nearly every scene imaginable. Once you stage the entire canon, you can mix and match masterpuppets to produce your own Shakespearean mash-ups. Two “wilde” cards allow you to even create characters of your own! Don’t worry, a 96-page folio is included with excerpts from classic scenes, in case you forgot to memorize your lines.

by J.C. Sciaccotta

29 Nov 2010

This edition of Sigmund Freud’s landmark tome is as much an elaborate art book as it is a guide to dream-interpretation. Which is appropriate, since Freud’s groundbreaking investigation of the subconscious had a profound and lasting impact on the visual arts. Surrealist masterpieces, contemporary artworks, and works by “pre-Freudean” artists who anticipated Freud’s themes, are beautifully reproduced in this volume. Unique to this edition are a series of cleverly “hidden” essays—tucked away inside two-page artwork throughout the book—in which Freud scholar Jefferey Moussaieff Masson explains (and sometimes muses) over the book’s major concepts while also scrutinizing the limitations, errors, and contradictions of Freud’s work.

//Mixed media

Because Blood Is Drama: Considering Carnage in Video Games and Other Media

// Moving Pixels

"It's easy to dismiss blood and violence as salacious without considering why it is there, what its context is, and what it might communicate.

READ the article