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Monday, Mar 10, 2014
by Gunter, Benbow, Morse
A weekly wrestling with the postmodern woes that still haunt our modern world…

This episode, by Stuart R. Gunter, Parker Benbow and Bayard Morse.


ENLARGE


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Monday, Mar 10, 2014
Rather than play into the global trauma of impending doom (as popularized by proponents of a prophesied Mayan Doomsday), Apocalypse Al offers a postmodern recalibration of that same impending doom.

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Ray Parker Jr. had better get his act in gear and come save me, because you see, I am being haunted. Haunted, by the ghosts of doomsdays past.


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Monday, Mar 3, 2014
It's a wonderful feeling to return to comics' pulp roots with a kind of fairy-tale storytelling that's even older.

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Around about page six of the upcoming issue of Fairest, both the flashback, and the magic kick in. No surprise there, the flashback is deeply tied to the magic of this issue.


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Wednesday, Feb 5, 2014
Imagine being inserted into the fictional milieu of Project Black Sky, publisher Dark Horse's in-house imaginary superhero world. SkyWatcher 1, blogger and EIC of SkyWatchers does this everyday, and doing so, redefines the border of the transmediated and the postmodern in comics.

Imagine if you will:


It’s approaching four AM on a late January morning and the late winter has gotten to me. I’ve been up for the last 40 hours or so, first tied up in a dread anticipation, then flying in to Arcadia, and now waiting for an honest-to-god clandestine meet in the small hours of the morning, with the Super Bowl just days away.


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Monday, Jan 27, 2014
With a subtle themed approach to the dark side of words and ideas, The Unwritten Vol. 8: Orpheus in the Underworlds takes the award-winning series into bold new territory.

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They’ll say it’s the dream that drove them apart. And they’ll be right, if they’re talking about Sigmund Freud and Carl Jung.


The thing that really did break apart one of the most profound and productive working relationships that spanned the cusp of the late 19th and 20th centuries, was a dream of Carl Jung’s.


In it, Jung dreamt of being in a house (although a house entirely unfamiliar to him he immediately thought of it as “my house”) with two floors. The upper, a luxurious salon outfitted in modern rococo style. Exploring the lower floor it found it styled in an older medieval vintage. Some impulse drove him even lower, into a cellar clearly recognizable from Roman times. And when he noticed a slab with an iron ring set in stone. Once moved, he entered into an underground cave bedecorate with primeval human culture, a cave where human experience just ran out.


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