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Thursday, Jan 7, 2010

Alexander Theroux calls blue “mysterious” in his book-length meditation The Primary Colours: “It is the colour of ambiguous depth, of the heavens and of the abyss at once.” That sense of ambiguity and overall strangeness seems to suffuse every one of Taiyo Matsumoto’s wavy lines in his short story collection Blue Spring.


The color carries more importance than being the title. Five years after the book was published in 1993, Matsumoto added to the mystery when he wrote of the work:


“No matter how passionate you were, no matter how much your blood boiled, I believe youth is a blue time. Blue—that indistinct blue that paints the town moments before the sun rises. Winter is coming.”



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Wednesday, Jan 6, 2010

I was a child of the 90s, but I was also a child in the 90s. Being born in ‘86 made getting to know good comics of the early 90s slightly difficult. Equally troubling, was the fact that I was not old enough to have a job, so no income. So, the only comics I was privilege to were those on the stands at the grocery store. Or yard sales. More often than not, comic books went unnoticed for me, especially by independent publishers.


Luckily, we have trade paperbacks that let us relive the days of our youth, to read the books we may have missed, without paying an arm and a leg for back issues. Exhibit A: Harbinger: Children of the Eighth Day.


I heard it was groundbreaking.


I heard it was well written. I just never took the time to read it myself. But am I ever glad I did. Especially now, as an adult.


The characters in this book were surprisingly deep. Flamingo and Sting stood out from the rest. With Flamingo trying to find self worth, after constantly pursuing meaningless sexual relationships; and Sting finding a balancing the good and evil uses of his powers, true internal struggles are depicted. It is hard not to be instantly invested in these characters lives. Seeing Kris and Sting fight at the end made me realize that.


One thing that does give this book a dated feel is some of the language. When an evil android is calling one of our heroes a “sneaky little slut”, you can’t help but chuckle. For the most part though, it flows. But every once in a while the vocabulary sticks out like a sore thumb, and makes you wonder if anyone ever used words like “scumblot”.


This book is very special, because it is simply about people and their relationships. And that was quite an achievement for the superhero-driven 90s. Yes, it is about having super powers, and fighting bad guys. But, at the very core of this story is the relationships. From beginning to end, we see these characters fight with each other, and struggle to get along. However, we also see them relying on each other for strength, standing up for one another when times are tough. These are ideals that everyone can relate to, regardless of when the book was written.


After 17 years, despite some slightly dated vocabulary, Harbinger: Children of the Eighth Day still tells an entertaining story, with easily relatable characters.


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Tuesday, Jan 5, 2010

Bruce Wayne is dead. Bruce Wayne is alive. Long live Bruce Wayne.


No matter what side of the dead or alive controversy following Bruce Wayne’s apparent death during the events of Final Crisis one may be on, the return of the character is inevitable and if the talk around town is correct will be the first major Missed Direction of 2010 for the DCU.


While it seems likely that the character will be returned to life or, at least, to our time period using the mechanism of ‘Oh Darkseid used the Omega Sanction on Bruce Wayne and that doesn’t really kill the person just displaces them in time’, using such a wellworn plot device to bring the character back would immediately suck the integrity out of not only the “Battle For The Cowl” arc, but all the existing Batman storylines (along with any emotional investment readers have put into the new world of Dick Grayson as Batman).


Since the return of Bruce Wayne in 2010 seems inevitable, here are a few scenarios to help keep the DCU Powers That Be on track.


1) Don’t bring back Bruce Wayne. Wait. That’s inevitable.


2) Don’t bring Bruce Wayne back as Batman. This is an excellent opportunity to show the personal growth of the character and explore storylines that take Wayne beyond Batman.


3) Don’t bring Bruce Wayne back in a series of stories that have him traveling through time until he reaches the present or have him be saved by Booster Gold. Remember, to those in the present moment he’s already dead if he’s in the distant past.


Instead, consider this: a new ongoing series that has Bruce Wayne in a time period set in the past using his skills to fight evil in a different place and time permanently.


Just a bit of out-of-the-cowl thinking can turn what will look like a marketing ploy into new mythology. The DCU Powers That Be should be urged to avoid taking this wrong direction with ‘The Return of Bruce Wayne’ in 2010.


Now, if only the Justice Society of America and Justice League can be saved. But that’s the subject for another tomorrow.


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Monday, Jan 4, 2010

Has the collaboration of writer Matt Fraction and artist Salvador Larroca produced the best comics of the past decade?


Issue 20 of Invincible Iron Man marks the beginning of the five-part “Stark: Disassembled” storyarc and sees the reboot of Tony Stark’s Iron Man in the skilled hands of series regulars Fraction and Larroca. But this is not the continuity reboot of the character, nor is this a modernization of the Iron Man mythos as was performed by writer Warren Ellis in 2005. Following the traumatic events which took place in the closing stages of preceding storyarc “World’s Most Wanted”, “Stark: Disassembled” opens with Tony Stark in a ‘persistent’ vegetative state’ after a self-performed lobotomy.


But Tony Stark has a contingency plan for everything. “Stark: Disassembled” relates the story of how Tony rallies his friends and compatriots to participate in rebooting his consciousness. This includes downloading his memories from a massive file server, recreating recombinant DNA that will enable him to pilot the Iron Man system, and a massive neuroelectric recharge that will finally reconcile Tony with the God of Thunder.


At the story’s heart however, lies the story of a reconciliation. For nearly half a decade, since 2007’s “Civil War” crossover event, Tony Stark’s Iron Man, Captain America and Thor have found themselves on opposite sides of a feud not of their own making. The three iconic, and in many senses most powerful, characters of the Marvel superheroes now found themselves gathered together once again. Will Cap and Thor participate in the resurrection of their fallen comrade? “Stark: Disassembled” is very much the story of mending fences across the chasm of a shared history, not all of it pleasant. In this regard it is the measure of such great Russian novels of the nineteenth century, like Tolstoy’s Anna Karenina.


What makes “Counting Up From Zero” (part one of “Stark: Disassembled”) at once so credible and so engaging is what Fraction and Larroca, along with series regular colorist Frank D’Armata, achieve over the course of six pages. With each page limited to an eight-panel grid (four vertically-stacked rows of two panels), readers view a recording of Tony’s final address as Director of intelligence agency S.H.I.E.L.D. In it, Tony reiterates his planned reboot, but also confronts the gathered heroes with the ethics of this resurrection. The comics itself is rigorous and disciplined, and wholly demonstrative of the full skill of the creative team at sustaining drama while engaging the audience with nothing more than a single image.


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Sunday, Dec 6, 2009

In his recent book Outliers, journalist Malcolm Gladwell investigates the phenomenon of the truly gifted who excel in their chosen fields and professions. What he finds is simply mind-boggling. Success it seems, is not so much rooted in talent, but relies on a vast and unseen network of lucky breaks that appears together with aptitude. The ‘self-made man’ is a myth, and ultimately one that proves dangerous to society.


In deference to this myth we fail to engineer opportunities that would allow for a proper meritocracy, Gladwell argues. We continue in the belief that hockey players are born rather than bred. Because of this we extend multiple opportunities to children born in the first three months of the year. These accumulated advantages create a vast ‘talent gap’ between children born in the first half of the year and their slightly younger counterparts. This is just one example, that when reengineered would prospectively double the pool of future hockey stars.


In 45 available this month from publisher Com.X, writer Andi Ewington treads a similar path to Gladwell. He makes use of long-form journalism as a tool for investigating the sociology of success. In a world populated by superheroes, a soon-to-be father attempts to structure his hopes and fears for his child by interviewing a series of super-powered humans. What could his child become in a world as wondrous as this one? Ewington’s fictional father undertakes a similar investigation to Gladwell in his preparation for Outliers.


But written during his wife’s pregnancy and by strange coincidence completed on the day of his son’s birth, 45 represents a very personal project for Ewington. With each ‘interview’ conducted in a unique graphic style, illustrated by a different artist, the book also represents a radical shift in comics storytelling.


The social realism of superheroes is a subgenre that stretches as far back as Denny o’ Neill and Neal Adams in the 1970s. It enters the popular imagination with Moore and Gibbons’ Watchmen in the mid-80s. Ewington reinvigorates this subgenre by reinventing it. Conceptually, he transcends even Moore and Gibbons’ offering. By offering a tale linked to the personal, by coordinating multiple visual styles in a single storyline, by presenting a journalism of the sociology of success, Ewington secures his own place in comics history.


This week’s Iconographies offers an in-depth profile of Andi Ewington and insight into his genre-defining debut work, 45.


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