Latest Blog Posts

by shathley Q

5 Feb 2014


Imagine if you will:

It’s approaching four AM on a late January morning and the late winter has gotten to me. I’ve been up for the last 40 hours or so, first tied up in a dread anticipation, then flying in to Arcadia, and now waiting for an honest-to-god clandestine meet in the small hours of the morning, with the Super Bowl just days away.

by Dominic Umile

7 Oct 2013


Set in switchblade-sharp, scratchy line work and brash dialogue, Iron Bound is a breathless run through Garden State dive bars and half-empty bowling alleys. Brooklyn comics artist Brendan Leach has a New Jersey suburbs background that he ties into mangled knots with this bulky black and white pulp for NYC publisher Secret Acres, name-dropping favorite shore-town watering holes and working-in affectionate renderings of classic boardwalk landmarks where possible. He winds the clock back to 1961 and follows a pair of biker jacket-clad hoods out for a quick buck as they advance up and down the Jersey turnpike in city buses or stolen cars.

by Dominic Umile

16 Jul 2013


When the DC Universe-spanning “Court of Owls” event concluded in late 2012, award-winning comics creator Becky Cloonan helmed art duties on most of Batman Vol. 2, #12, the issue that immediately followed the Dark Knight’s face-off with Lincoln March. Scott Snyder, the writer behind the sprawling behemoth’s relaunch of their most popular character’s primary book, wrote a standalone story that Cloonan worked on. Inexplicably, it marked the first time that a woman’s name snatched the “Artist” credit in Batman. “The club of women who have written Batman books (as opposed to the broader set Batbooks which includes titles like Nightwing and Birds of Prey) is very small,” observed DC Women Kicking Ass back then.

by Dominic Umile

20 Jun 2013


Even as we’re offered a peek through its many keyholes, things at Montague Terrace are a bit hazy. Once a Web comic hosted at the Activate collective, the black and white now-graphic novel from British brothers Warren and Gary Pleece is an uncomfortable read—rarely are the dramatics brought to distinct conclusions, and linear paths are hard to come by. No matter, these are opaque vignettes worth exploring. The Pleeces’ comics are rife with paranoia, surrealism, and for good measure, an occasional rift that opens up somewhere between present-day and flashback storytelling.

by Mike Cassella

10 Apr 2013


When Marvel announced the high concept of the Uncanny Avengers title, fans raised an eyebrow. “Hey look! Mutants as Avengers!” was uttered briefly by the collective fanbase and then… nothing. Whether it was due to the title’s frequent shipping delays or the fact that every character in Marvel was an Avenger now, fans moved on from discussing the title at length. That all changed with issue #5.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Ubisoft Understands the Art of the Climb

// Moving Pixels

"Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed and Grow Home epitomize the art of the climb.

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