Call for Book Reviewers and Bloggers

Latest Posts

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jul 14, 2014
Stream the new track from the transcontinental supergroup Three Minute Tease's forthcoming album Bite the Hand, the ominous "Bravely Fade Away".

The gritty distortion that drives “Bravely Fade Away”, the newest cut by the transcontinental supergroup Three Minute Tease, is but one of many reasons why the trio’s sound has been called “pre-apocalyptic psychedelic pop”. The band, consisting of the Berlin-based Anton Barbeau, London bassist Andy Metcalfe, and Morris Windsor (who hails from England’s west coast), has an approachability that has a darkness underneath it. Barbeau’s lead vocal on “Bravely Fade Away” isn’t too far from the friendlier environs of singer/songwriter territory, but the almost sludgy guitars on the song’s chorus add an ominous dimension to the tune.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jul 14, 2014
Timberlake performed an exclusive show for 2,200 people in the middle of his Summer arena tour run.

Justin Timberlake is in the middle of a huge sold-out arena tour yet he took the time to perform a more “intimate” show at New York’s Hammerstein Ballroom for a corporate sponsor, Mastercard. Or it could have been American Airlines who had a larger promotional presence on site, but I don’t think I heard Timberlake give them props during his show. Just the credit card. In any case, the exclusivity made this the hot event of the night for New Yorkers even if it wasn’t the hot event of the week. There were several large concerts going on in the NYC area over several (other) nights including Katy Perry across the street at the Garden and Beyoncé and Jay-Z with two nights at the Meadowlands (Hova did not grace JT’s set unfortunately).


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jul 14, 2014
When you think of B-52's songs, you think fun, wacky, playful, bizarre. With "Dance This Mess Around", you get raw, emotionally charged, sultry, and ... the best song they ever wrote.

When people think of the B-52’s, they often think of fun, silly, and energetic party-pop songs, and for good reason: a great majority of the hits they’re remembered for fit this bill to a T, filled with call-and-response vocals and rather buoyant melodies. Sometimes they were goofy, sometimes they were a bit more traditional with their themes, but they were always a lot of people’s one-stop-shop for good times and fun rhymes.


However, what may arguably be the single greatest song they’ve ever created retains none of these features. “Dance This Mess Around” is filled with longing, a bit of rage, and a vibe that is downright sultry, the soundtrack to a late-night slowjam in a room lit by nothing but lava lamps. There has never been a B-52’s song quite like it, but, most distressingly, they never attempted to go after this vibe ever again.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Monday, Jul 14, 2014
Despite the film’s hipster soundtrack and depiction of twenty-something malaise, it ultimately embraces the human spirit and all of the sentimentality that goes with it.

The year was 2004. I was a freshman in high school, and I was on the cusp of discovering my passion for cinema. I ditched class on a Tuesday and snuck into the local theater to see Zach Braff’s Garden State with a friend, not knowing that this would change my life and convert me to the church of cinephilia.


For those who haven’t seen the film, it’s about Andrew Largeman (Braff), an emotionally detached 26 year old who returns to his hometown of New Jersey for his mother’s funeral after living in Los Angeles for ten years. Andrew intends to visit for a few a days, and in the process reconnects with old friends, struggles to resolve issues with his distant father (Ian Holm), and forms a romantic relationship with Sam (Portman), a local young woman with problems of her own.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Friday, Jul 11, 2014
Sometimes, reality TV lives up to its name and casts "by the numbers". Most of the time, however, it casts according to race and sexual orientation.

Since their launch onto the American television landscape (c. 2000, with the debut of season one of Survivor), the great appeal of reality TV programs have been their promise of unpredictability. 


For various generations raised on television (which, at the moment, is almost everyone), so many fictional series had, by the time of reality TV’s arrival, become so predictable that it created a chasm large enough for reality to root itself and foster, offering up an unexpected type of TV where villains often triumphed (see: Richard Hatch in Survivor‘s first season), “good guys” had feet of clay, and “right” and “wrong” became irreparably muddled.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements
Win a 15-CD Pack of Brazilian Music CDs from Six Degrees Records! in PopMatters Contests on LockerDome

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.