Latest Blog Posts

by Sloane Spencer

2 Sep 2015

"If Drivin' N'  Cryin' sounded as good in the '80s as we do now, we could have been as big as Cinderella." -- Kevn Kinney

Kevn Kinney of Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ has been a thread throughout my life in music, from teenage punk wannabe sneaking into clubs for shows (thanks, Randy!), to not getting hired at the first radio station I interviewed for because the program director told me he hated Drivin’ N’ Cryin’ and I defended them anyway (look who turned out to be right, Chris), to one of the very first radio shows on Country Fried Rock, before we had a podcast and were still streaming on Live 365, to now—me filling my dream of talking to the best songwriters about music I love and so many of y’all loving what we share. Kevn Kinney changed my life and now his band will be inducted into the Georgia Music Hall of Fame.

by Sarah Zupko

2 Sep 2015

Battle's eagerly awaited  new album La Di Da Di releases September 18th and the group has just released the new track "FF Bada".

“FF Bada” is an exciting, funky instrumental that draws inspiration from the worlds of electronic, jazz and new classical. The song has a great sense of movement, feeling simultaneously like a master jam session and a carefully constructed composition. “FF Bada” is equally for the brain and the feet, like all of Battles’ best tunes. The group continues to smash genre barriers in a successful effort to create truly original music.

by Adrien Begrand

2 Sep 2015

It's always a  good time for bright, uplifting soul/R&B.

New York R&B singer Jasmine Jordan returns this week with her new single and video “Smile”, her first new music since her debut EP Time Travel. Continuing in the same direction as the EP—putting a contemporary spin on classic, vibrant 1970s urban soul—the track and video focuses more on the ebullience of the music, making for an upbeat, effervescent track.

by G. Christopher Williams

2 Sep 2015

In Game  Art, Matt Sainsbury is asking questions of video game developers that one might ask a movie director or a novelist or a painter.

Tengami (Nyamyam, 2015)

When I started writing seriously about games in 2002, most of what was being written about video games came largely in the form of previews and product reviews. Video games were still largely being covered as a form of entertainment, but largely anyone, like myself, pondering whether or not the medium might be more than a frivolous way of passing time existed only in fairly small numbers in pockets of the Internet.

As the decade progressed, though, more and more bloggers appeared asking questions similar to my own about whether or not video games were not just a pastime, but also an art form. Many mainstream gaming web sites began including essays of a more critical (that is, “critical” in the sense of art criticism) nature alongside the more traditional offerings of screen shots and consumer information about video games. Infamously, Roger Ebert declared that video games were not art, but by the mid 2000s, there were an awful lot of writers, some journalists, some academics, and some enthusiasts, talking about video games, their stories, their mechanisms, and even their possible aesthetics using that very term.

by Steve Horowitz

1 Sep 2015

British hip-hop master  Wiley and UK electronic musician Zomby join forces on "Step 2001".

Steve Horowitz: This track is crammed. The lines range from everything from the biographical (“You want to know me I put my life in a song”) to the existential (“No love in the land of the lazy”) to the mundane (“I like rice, Basmati”) without ever dropping the beat or straying from the icy landscape of the sonic construction. There’s something happening here. Resolution may not be reached, but it’s a step. No wonder it ends with a sour vocal. Growth is painful. [7/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Game Art': Letting the Developers Speak

// Moving Pixels

"In Game Art, Matt Sainsbury is asking questions of video game developers that one might ask a movie director or a novelist or a painter.

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