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Friday, Jul 11, 2014
When coming of age movies are measured years from now, Boyhood will be the benchmark for artistic achievement and cinematic scope.

Our lives are made up of individual moments, parsed out over individual minutes over individual seconds which, in the end, always seem too short and sadly succinct. There’s no great story arc, just lots of little ones, each playing out among the various personality pros and cons we develop and scatter like so many dandelion seeds into the wind.


By the time we are old enough to realize it, we only remember the epics, the instances where things changed radically for better and worse. Births, deaths, degrees, achievements, jobs, kids, diseases, divorces—these are the buzzwords we use as we spin our time into something more meaningful. In the end, though, those individual moments fade, failing to resonate as powerfully as a performance or a passing, a problem or an epiphany.


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Friday, Jul 11, 2014
The kinds of choices that force us to define what we value and how a game is about what we value are best implemented at the end of that game.

A couple of weeks ago here at PopMatters, Eric Swain wrote about a more complex form of moral choice in games.


It’s not a question of right or wrong, but a question of priorities. The player is offered up two rights and asked to make a choice between them ... The morality here isn’t based on abstract rules, but on the individual player—what they would do and why is up to them” (Eric Swain, “More Thoughts on a More Complex Form of Moral Choice in Video Games”, 24 June 2014)



I agree with everything Swain has written, but I’d also like to add an important caveat to the conversation. These kinds of complex moral choices, the kind that force us to choose between two philosophical truths that will go on to define who we are, what we value, and how the game is about what we value, these kinds of choices are best implemented at the end of a game.


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Thursday, Jul 10, 2014
Stream a song from the forthcoming collaboration between Nigerian music staple Orlando Julius' forthcoming collaboration with the London group The Heliocentrics, entitled "Buje Buje".

Orlando Julius is a legend of Nigerian music, having played now for decades, which has included playing with legends of American blues, jazz, and R&B, including a performance with the legendary Louis Armstrong. His fusion of Nigerian music with global influences makes him a voice unlike any other.


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Thursday, Jul 10, 2014
The affable pop of London indie rockers the History of Apple pie has not at all changed since their last LP, as their new tune "Tame" evidences.

The History of Apple Pie have released a new tune from their forthcoming album, Feel Something. This LP follows their debut, Out of View, which PopMatters premiered in the US back in 2013. Just as it was the case on Out of View, the band’s new tune, “Tame”, is a tasty slice of pop, with pumped piano chords forming a jaunty rhythm that complements the song’s somewhat hazy production quality.


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Thursday, Jul 10, 2014
Ruthless reveals a message about capitalism that, if ubiquitous, rings true.

Ruthless is an Eagle-Lion production that must be the most lavish project ever directed by Edgar Ulmer, who spent most of his career working with budgets that seemed barely to include the camera. Thematically, it’s his Citizen Kane or Magnificent Amberson, here seen in a fine print showing off sinuous and ceiling-heavy photography from Bert Glennon and lavish design from Frank Sylos. Unlike the aforementioned films, Ruthless is not great; however, it’s hard to take one’s eyes off of.


Tagged as: edgar ulmer, ruthless
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