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by Brice Ezell

2 Jun 2015

UK neo-soul crooner  John Newman flashes off his skill in crafting a huge pop chorus with his latest single "Come and Get It".

In writing about John Newman for PopMatters’ “Best New and Emerging Artists 2013”, Colin McGuire claims, “If 2013 was the year… Newman broke through into a good bit of Europe’s broken hearts, 2014 ought to be the year the western world takes notice. The guy is a master at writing songs that beg to be played in arenas, and [debut album] Tribute, if nothing else, proves that the artist behind them is certainly worthy of the stage.” If you haven’t discovered Newman’s anthemic and infectious music—“Love Me Again” truly is the definition of the latter—then there’s no time better than the present, as Newman has just dropped a new single, “Come and Get It”. Unsurprisingly for the young (soon to turn 25) musician, the chorus is positively huge, and catchy in a near undeniable way.

by Michael Barrett

2 Jun 2015

Unfairly cast aside  as tasteless during its time for its depiction of homosexuality, Staircase is a serious film in need of a second critical appraisal.

Time has not only been kind to Staircase; it’s also been illuminating. Directed by Stanely Donen and scripted by Charles Dyer from his play, the entire drama consists of Richard Burton and Rex Harrison playing an old gay couple sniping at each other in elaborately bitchy dialogue—which pretty much describes the currently acclaimed Britcom Vicious with Ian McKellen and Derek Jacobi.

In 1969, mainstream critics found the movie tasteless. In the post-Stonewall era, gay activists like Vito Russo in The Celluloid Closet found it embarrassing because, in the context of just about zero depictions of homosexuality in cinema apart from cross-dressing psychos and suicidal sissies, the movie relies on the stereotype of the effeminate, limp-wristed, campy, mother-dominated queen instead of a politically preferred image of butch “mainstream” types. It was the era when one character in the supposedly progressive and groundbreaking The Boys in the Band asked “Why do we hate each other so much?” Films like Staircase and Robert Aldrich’s The Killing of Sister George were bleak instead of validating, and activists didn’t want that any more than they wanted movies about drag queens (even though there really were drag queens at Stonewall).

by PopMatters Staff

2 Jun 2015

PopMatters is looking  for a few part-time sales reps to sell in-category and brand advertising for the site.

These are perfect positions for people who work at other magazines in specific markets who want to add PopMatters to their rosters, MBA students, and people with relationships in the entertainment industries who are looking for extra income. These are commission-based positions.

Familiarity with PopMatters editorial is a must, as is a full understanding of our publishing mission.

Please send your resume to PopMatters Editor & Publisher, Sarah Zupko at at editor (at) popmatters.com and Managing Editor, Karen Zarker at zarker (at) popmatters.com. Email subject line: PopMatters Advertising Sales Rep.

by Brice Ezell

2 Jun 2015

The sing-along chorus  of the National Parks' 'Monsters of the North' is now met by a stunning lyric video replete with sharp nature images.

Photo: Justin Hackworth

In August 2015, the Provo, Utah band the National Parks will release their sophomore LP Until I Live. As the lyric video for album cut “Monsters of the North” reveals, however, this seven-piece outfit has already readied itself for the summer months. With elegant typeface laid atop a string of beautifully photographed nature imagery, “Monsters of the North”‘s lyric video feels like a whole summer rolled up into three minutes and 52 seconds. Combine that with a chorus that’s perfect for road-trip singalongs and you’ve got a fine aural/video pairing.

by Brice Ezell

2 Jun 2015

The Delaware-based Teen  Men have a new, self-titled LP out next week. You can stream the playful and melodic Teen Men exclusively on PopMatters.

Photo: Jessica Scarane

Teen Men take their name from a Playboy advert dating back to the ‘60s. The opening tune of their new, self-titled LP, “Hiding Records (So Dangerous)”, begins with a phrase that sounds like an alternate take on the Rugrats theme. From this, one can reasonably infer that “playful” is among the adjectives one can pin on the Delaware-based quartet. Yet this slightly goofy creativity exists not merely for the purpose of giggle-inducing; rather, it’s another dimension to Teen Men’s multi-colored sonic canvas. To hear these colors in play, you can stream Teen Men in full below.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Staircase' Is Gay in a Melancholy Way

// Short Ends and Leader

"Unfairly cast aside as tasteless during its time for its depiction of homosexuality, Staircase is a serious film in need of a second critical appraisal.

READ the article