Latest Blog Posts

by Brice Ezell

5 May 2015

Pop-savvy musical minds  from fun. and Orchestral Manoeuvres in the Dark (OMD) come together in this contribution to the new Jack Black comedy The D Train.

Andy McCluskey (OMD), Rob Kroehler (Ladylike), Jack Antonoff (fun.) and Andrew Dost (fun.) have formed a formidable pop collective for “A Million Stars”, a tune drenched in ‘80s sheen, which features on the soundtrack to the Jack Black and James Marsden comedy The D Train. McCluskey, Antonoff, and Dost harmonize together splendidly, no doubt due in part to the latter two’s proclivity for harmonized vocals in the music of fun. Above all else, though, it’s the stylistics of OMD that shine through most resoundingly on “A Million Stars”; both the chorus and the synths used throughout the tune are highly reminiscent of OMD’s most recent LP, 2013’s English Electric (which we here at PopMatters are big fans of).

In addition to his presence on “A Million Stars”, Dost is responsible for the original score to The D Train.

by Brice Ezell

5 May 2015

The jazzy guitar  stylings of Wes Montgomery have never sounded as good as they do on his latest compilation, In the Beginning.

Fortunately for fans of both Wes Montgomery and great jazz music, the 2012 release Echoes of Indiana Avenue won’t be the last set of undiscovered tunes by Montgomery to grace the world. That LP is being followed up now by in the Beginning, a two-disc compilation that spans the year 1949 to 1958. Of the many features in this voluminous set, five tunes in particular stand out, each of which have been languishing in Sony Music Entertainment’s vaults for upwards of 60 years.

“Far Wes”, which you can here exclusively below, is one such discovery. Taken from a 1955 recording session at New York City’s Columbia Studios (where Miles Davis would later record Kind of Blue), the song is produced by the now reputable Quincy Jones, then an up-and-coming producer. At the end of “Far Wes”, you can hear recording engineer Frank Laico call out, “Quincy, there’s a call for you!”

by Grace Lichtenstein

5 May 2015

The language and  dialogue in his latest novel, The Whites, gives away his identity -- and that's a good thing.

After reading The Whites “by Richard Price writing as Harry Brandt” the big question I had was: why the awkward authorial byline? In interviews, Price said he wanted to try his hand at a straight-ahead crime novel, as opposed to his works that make greater sociological statements like Clockers or Lush Life. But The Whites certainly achieves the higher-than-just-police-stuff standard Price has always set for himself.

by Brice Ezell

5 May 2015

After a 16-year  hiatus from New York City stages, Blur came back to Brooklyn with a new album in tow, the much-acclaimed The Magic Whip.

In his 7 out of 10 PopMatters review of Blur’s “comeback” album The Magic Whip, their first since 2003’s Think Tank, Evan Sawdey writes, “All The Magic Whip tries to be is nothing more than the band in their purest form, deprived of all commercial considerations so that their eccentricities are all that remains. Well, guess what, boys? Mission accomplished.”

by Brice Ezell

5 May 2015

World music comes  together in Williamsburg in the latest album by Brooklyn Gypsies, Sin Fronteras: "Without Borders".

The all-too-easy to make generalization about the state of the Brooklyn music scene in 2015 is that it’s comprised of a bunch of white guy-led indie bands all trying to out-falsetto Thom Yorke. However, like any music scene, such sweeping generalizations don’t fully encompass the diversity of musical exploration that one can find if he really digs beneath the surface. Enter: Brooklyn Gypsies.

//Blogs

Why Novelist Richard Price Doesn't Need a Pseudonym

// Re:Print

"The language and dialogue in his latest novel, The Whites, gives away his identity -- and that's a good thing.

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