Latest Blog Posts

by Danilo Bortoli

9 Feb 2016

Beau Sorenson's music  is reminiscent of the neoclassical movement that gained momentum during the aughts, yet successfully veers towards a more experimental direction.

Piano music, even considering the neoclassical movement that sprouted (briefly) during the beginning of the last decade, is still regarded as a formalist type of art. It’s rare to see artists in the mainstream and even in the blogosphere break through the model. When such event takes place, we end up getting Max Richter‘s deeply rooted Romanticism or Nils Frahm‘s more agitated experiments.

by PopMatters Staff

9 Feb 2016

As Staples' verses  drift in between Flume's airy opus, the song's brevity fails to underscore his purpose.

Stephen Wyatt: Flume knows very well how Vince Staples can make a track turnt. The 24-year-old enfant terrible sharpens his production fangs on “Smoke and Retribution”, providing sweetness in Kucka’s deliberately quiet delivery to Staples’ untainted saltiness. As Staples’ verses drift in between Flume’s airy opus, the song’s brevity fails to underscore his purpose. Moreover, Kucka’s underutilization on “Smoke and Retribution” triggers the thought that this track was, in fact, rushed and unfinished. [5/10]

by Boen Wang

9 Feb 2016

Nils Pihl calls  it, "Newtonian engagement", that is, when "an engaged player will remain engaged until acted upon by an outside force". That's "progress".

Need for Speed: Most Wanted (Electronic Arts, 2012)

I press start, and I’m in motion. I’m playing Need for Speed: Most Wanted and the game opens in medias res in an Aston Martin motoring down the freeway. The camera swings around and locks into position behind the car, at which point I instinctively squeeze the right trigger.

I am in control.

by Cynthia Fuchs

9 Feb 2016

“It’s unbelievable .” The first words spoken in Abduction: The Megumi Yokota Story sum up the horror about to unfold.

“It’s unbelievable.” The first words spoken in Abduction: The Megumi Yokota Story sum up the horror about to unfold. Directed by Chris Sheridan and Patty Kim and released in 2006, the film tells a story that is alarming to this day. In 1977, 13-year-old Megumi was walking home from school in Nigata, Japan, and disappeared. Her mother, Megumi’s younger brother Tetsuya says, “Even though I was just a kid, I knew something big was happening.” Sakie, recalls worrying but not quite absorbing the profound loss before her. The camera hovers over the sidewalk where Megumi walked, looks up at tree branches that likely cast shadows over her. The sun sinks into a distant horizon, and a percussive soundtrack pulses, pushing forward, ever faster. The sea laps the shore, ominously. 

by PopMatters Staff

8 Feb 2016

Twenty years later , Low still travels at the speed of silence, utilizing time and space as instruments equally worthy of their otherworldly harmonies.

Photo: Zoran Orlic

Stephen Wyatt: Twenty years later, Low still travels at the speed of silence, utilizing time and space as instruments equally worthy of their otherworldly harmonies. Mimi Parker delivers moments of peace in whispers on “Into You” and explodes over the classically-formed minimalism Alan Sparkhawk constructed during in the era of grunge. Even today Low sounds more like an antidote to overproduced pop and EDM. The sparse electronics carefully instruct today’s musicians about how the less-is-more philosophy still reigns as pop music’s perfect prescription. [9/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

In Motion: On the Emptiness of Progress

// Moving Pixels

"Nils Pihl calls it, "Newtonian engagement", that is, when "an engaged player will remain engaged until acted upon by an outside force". That's "progress".

READ the article