Call for Music Writers... Rock, Indie, Urban, Electronic, Americana, Metal, World and More

Latest Posts

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Aug 20, 2014
Mutineers may not represent David Gray's best work, but his performance at Northerly Island nonetheless found him in fine form.

The fact that David Gray is able to nearly fill massive venues across the world almost 15 years after the release of his lone global breakthrough (1999’s White Ladder) is somewhat perplexing. This isn’t because Gray himself is bad; he, in fact, remains one of the most underrated singer/songwriters out there. But in going through his discography, it doesn’t take one long to realize just how off-kilter he is compared to his contemporaneous singer/songwriters. His chord progressions are often unpredictable and at times unsettling (“When I Was in Your Heart” from 2010’s Foundling); his choruses typically rely on repeated simple phrases (“It takes a lot of love” from fan favorite “My Oh My”); and, most of all, his lyrics, while rich with playful alliteration and intriguing images, at times become too surreal for their own good (“There are carnivals of silverfish waiting to dance upon our bones” from 2009’s Draw the Line). He’s easy to admire, but it’s equally easy to be confounded by how popular he remains, given the type of fare that typically does well in the mainstream public.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Aug 20, 2014
If you were a child of the '70s, you no doubt grew up hearing these tunes slipping out your parents' eight-track player and car radio. The songs on the list are sappy, high-drama love ballads -- and for that they're being celebrated

“Easy listening“, “adult contemporary“, “elevator music“: these dirty words have been used to describe some of the songs on the following list. In their defense, these songs came out in the ‘70s, which was the height of the soft rock revolution, yet some of the songs have their roots in rock and R&B, and transcend the time period they were released in. And those songs that don’t? Oh, well. As Paul McCartney said: “Some people wanna fill the world with silly love songs. And what’s wrong with that?”


If you were a child of the ‘70s, you no doubt grew up hearing these tunes slipping out your parents’ eight-track player and car radio. The songs on the list are sappy, high-drama love ballads, and for that they’re being celebrated. However, the songs aren’t only about love and breakups; they also represent a simpler, more carefree time for a generation getting older and perhaps nostalgic.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Wednesday, Aug 20, 2014
If the player of a building game like Clockwork Empires is intended to help build a world in the game itself, shouldn't that player be able to take part in the process of building Clockwork Empires itself?

For the low, low price of 30 bucks, you can play test Clockwork Empires for Gaslamp Games. Or, at least, that’s what it feels like to me when an individual plunks down his or her money for most games labeled “Early Access” on Steam.


My perspective may be a bit retrograde in the post-Minecraft gaming landscape. I’m informed by the old school idea that playtesting is a paid position in a game development company, given that it isn’t necessarily a pleasure to play buggy and unfinished products. Playtesting is a part of the creation of a game, necessary to a video game as copyediting is to a novel. And while I have playtested in an unpaid capacity before, as a beta tester, still I never paid anything for the privilege. After all, it seems a bit like a job.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014
Lincoln Center wishes José González a happy birthday after his unique performance with yMusic.

José González’s delicate songs were reframed at Lincoln Center’s ‘Out of Door’s Summer series with the addition and incorporation of chamber orchestra arrangements (by Rob Moose) as part of a collaboration with yMusic. Unbeknownst to me and perhaps much of the audience, the performance was held on the same day as González’s birthday, so it was a pleasant surprise (for him too I’m sure) to wish the musician a “Happy Birthday” at the end.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Tuesday, Aug 19, 2014
Stream the video for Portland indie synth-pop band Hawks Do Not Share's latest tune, "Break Even", which you can also download for free.

Having now just dropped its debut, the Portland, Oregon-based Hawks Do Not Share have now readied their latest music video for the public eye. The song, “Break Even”, features a submerged, echoey vocal that fans of Chelsea Wolfe will find appeal in. Hawks Do Not Share, however, opt for a murky synth background to the vocals rather than that goth chanteuse‘s dark, guitar-driven rock.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.