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by PopMatters Staff

12 Feb 2016

Missy is still  exhilarating, but "Pep Rally" doesn't quite hold up to "WTF".

Magdalen Jenne: At this point any Missy is still exhilarating, but “Pep Rally” doesn’t quite hold up to “WTF”, her tremendous comeback single. It’s a little on-the-nose, feels a little like corporate mass-produced music, but it’s still Missy bringing her best energy, which means it’s still better than plenty of other stuff. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

12 Feb 2016

A striking level  of both daring and maturity emerges in the songwriting ability of Tyler, the Creator on this track.

Chad Miller: A track that nails the balance between evoking the past and pointing towards the future. Kali Uchis does an excellent job as the lead vocalist, giving the song a jazzy feel. Also, the sound shift as the song approaches its second minute provides a nice tonal change before the song ends, almost like the track is cooling down. It’s refreshing to hear. [8/10]

by Sachyn Mital

12 Feb 2016

Co-presented by the  World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

Violinist Dr. L Subramaniam presented his Lakshminarayana Global Music Festival, in collaboration with the World Music Institute, in New York at the 92Y on February 5, 2016. It was a rare U.S. performance, his first here since 2006, for the classically and traditionally trained virtuoso. The crowd at the Y was markedly different from that at a typical event—a sea of brown faces, including mine, turned up (and I believe security seemed heavier than normal inside and with at least one police officer positioned outside the venue).

L. Subramaniam was accompanied by a small group for a mesmerizing Carnatic performance that went over ninety minutes. Seated on the Dr.‘s left was his son, Ambi Subramaniam, an acclaimed violinist in his own right. To the side of the father and son were Mahesh Krishnamurthy on mridangam and Ravi Balasubramaniam slapping the ghatam (essentially a clay pot). The elder Subramaniam introduced each of his pieces, the ragas, explaining the time signatures and the key changes. The first raga was Varnam and it began with him solo, then transitioned into a violin call and response with his son before the percussion joined in. Time flew by during the performance as the rich sonics resonated in the auditorium.

by PopMatters Staff

12 Feb 2016

Nice vocal harmonies  and brass accents do a lot to add to "I Have Been to the Mountain's" atmosphere.

Magdalen Jenne: The most basic song, but a handful of smart production and arrangement choices elevate it from dull to really likable. The horns are an especially nice touch, and lend the track a swampy kind of southern gothic edge. Can’t do anything to cut back on the cheese factor on the video, though. [6/10]

by PopMatters Staff

12 Feb 2016

Innocence lost set  to a gorgeous hymn in Mount Moriah's "Baby Blue".

Eric Risch: Toying with perception, the Jordan Blake-directed video for Mount Moriah‘s “Baby Blue” sets photographer Robert Frank’s The Americans in motion. Seemingly candid moments proving anything but, we are left to question everything we see. Innocence lost set to a gorgeous hymn. [7/10]

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Violin Virtuoso L. Subramaniam Mesmerizes in Rare New York Performance (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Co-presented by the World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

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