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by PopMatters Staff

28 Jul 2016

Producer the Bug  teams up with grime MC D Double E and it's a deft pairing.

Chris Ingalls: An excellent collaborative effort that seems completely natural. Producer the Bug teams up with grime MC D Double E and it’s a deft pairing. Everything clicks. The Bug’s stuttering beats and blips are a perfect foil for D Double E’s rapid-fire rhymes, creating a contemporary urgency. The arrangement is dense and stuffed with interesting sonic choices - there’s something new to discover on each listen. [8/10]

by Will Rivitz

28 Jul 2016

“The Holy Ghost ” stomps in double time, driving 12-bar blues marrying frenetic guitar in an explosion of weariness.

decker.’s rock draws from blues, garage-rock revival, and psychedelic—all genres stemming from a dusty, down-home electricity. “The Holy Ghost” stomps in double time, driving 12-bar blues marrying frenetic guitar in an explosion of weariness. decker.’s harried twang holds down center stage, wildly gesticulating in a way that mirrors the live-wire guitar solo midway through. It’s stressful in the most enticing way, driving full speed towards a wall and living off the thrill of being so close to the edge.

by Will Rivitz

28 Jul 2016

If you’ve  ever complained about people tagging music which ends up being too straightforward for your taste “psychedelic rock”, the Dan Ryan might be something you’d like.

If you’ve ever complained about people tagging music which ends up being too straightforward for your taste “psychedelic rock”, the Dan Ryan might be something you’d like. “Tomorrow Forever” is all whimsy and LSD-fueled glee, trance-like drums falling into line behind off-kilter synths and inseparable waves of guitar. There’s more than a little Beatles influence, inspiration taken from Harrison’s journeys in Asia and the sonic collages on the group’s later albums, but that influence is used in novel ways. It’s exceedingly trippy, not in the “man, this light show is so trippy, man” sense, but truly in the scatterbrained, wildly colorful acid sense. Things are all over the place, and that’s just fine.

by Will Rivitz

28 Jul 2016

Every Orchid  Offering is blocky and pleasantly unwieldy, a definite boon in a style of alt-pop which prides itself on its obtuseness.

Andrew Keoghan‘s Every Orchid Offering is a mélange of tangential genres. There’s a touch of baroque chamber pop a la Son Lux, a smattering of off-color indie pop of the Dirty Projectors’ style, and snippets of the hyperprocessed muzak of vaporwave. It’s blocky and pleasantly unwieldy, a definite boon in a style of alt-pop which prides itself on its obtuseness. Weird pop is always intriguing, since there’s so many ways its weirdness can manifest — and the teetering disco of Every Orchid Offering is certainly a satisfying implementation.

by Jorge Albor

28 Jul 2016

I’ve never  felt more out of touch.

I’m staring at my local gym leader’s cp 1323 Exeggutor and struggling to understand the popularity of Pokémon Go. It’s been a few weeks since the game came out and I just don’t get. My day job is literally to get this kind of stuff, to understand what makes a trending game interesting to the millions of people who play it, but it’s hard. As someone deeply embedded in the games industry, I’ve never felt more out of touch. Maybe I’m getting old.

Alright, well to be fair, I do understand the basic allure of Pokémon Go. Pokémon is a huge franchise with a lot of nostalgia attached to it. It’s no surprise people familiar with Pikachu and the gang are checking out the app. I also see why the quirky ARG overlay of Pokémon sitting on your coffee table or something is funny in a gimmicky sort of way—hey, look, it’s Koffing in a vape shop. Hell, I can even see why folks rally around the fictional teams of Valor, Mystic, and Instinct. We’re all familiar with group mentality and the sorting hat.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

I Don't Get 'Pokémon Go'

// Moving Pixels

"I’ve never felt more out of touch.

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