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by PopMatters Staff

23 Sep 2016

Donovan Woods releases  another clever song about love and loss.

JUNO and Polaris Prize-nominated singer-songwriter Donovan Woods released a deluxe edition of his fourth album, Hard Settle, Ain’t Troubled, back on August 22nd that includes four bonus live performance tracks. Woods’ profile is rising quickly and making his hometown of Toronto proud as he’s become an in-demand songwriter in Nashville with his plainspoken but universal lyrics. “What They Mean” premieres today on PopMatters.

by Eric Risch

23 Sep 2016

Seeking to create  an album of songs with a “head bobbin’ vibe”, the slow country churn of Stewart Eastham's latest single, "Leavin' By Sundown", fits that bill.

Photo: Katrena Rochell

Having relocated to Nashville from Los Angeles at the turn of the decade, singer/songwriter Stewart Eastham launched his solo career in 2013 after disbanding his original group, Day of the Outlaw. Reconvening the rhythm section of his former band for sophomore solo outing Dancers in the Mansion, Eastham’s goal was to create an album of songs with a “head bobbin’ vibe”.

by Evan Sawdey

23 Sep 2016

Prince's childhood friend  and bassist came back with socially-conscious rock in 2014, but with his new EP, addresses America's race issues head-on.

Photo: Katherine Copeland Anderso

Andre Cymone‘s place in history—as a childhood friend of Prince who was also his early bassist, to say nothing of his own unique solo career—is absolutely secure. For Cymone, however, that doesn’t mean he’s comfortable.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Sep 2016

Royal Canoe releases  a new album of delicious indie pop and a new groove-laden single, "Bicycle".

Photo: Bill Acheson

Canadian indie poppers Royal Canoe released their latest album, Something Got Lost Between Here and the Orbit, just last week and the band’s new single is the catchy, groove-laden “Bicycle” that quickly establishes itself as a bonafide earworm. The tune is backed by this lovely new animated video created by Bill Acheson and Matea Radic. They’re going to tell us about how they made the video, but please be sure to check out the band’s huge list of tour dates below so you can catch them live.

by Nick Dinicola

23 Sep 2016

The common cries  of disappointment that surround No Man’s Sky stem from the exciting idea of an infinite universe clashing with the harsh reality of an infinite universe.

There are two endings to No Man’s Sky, and both are the very definition of anti-climactic. Fans that were already disappointed with the game latched onto the endings as justification for their feelings, undeniable proof that No Man’s Sky was a creative failure. But they’re wrong.

The endings certainly lack spectacle, especially the kind of destructive spectacle that defines a lot of games, but that’s the point. When you think about what kind of game No Man’s Sky is—the ideas it expresses, the things it considers important, and the things that it wants you to consider important—then these anticlimaxes become inevitable and revelatory. Together, they make a quiet yet grandiose statement about life’s relationship to the universe, expressed through the mechanics of gameplay.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

In Defense of the Infinite Universe in 'No Man's Sky'

// Moving Pixels

"The common cries of disappointment that surround No Man’s Sky stem from the exciting idea of an infinite universe clashing with the harsh reality of an infinite universe.

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