{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by Michael Barrett

21 Aug 2017

Whether we've seen  or read the story before, we ache for these sympathetic, floundering people presented to us gravely and without cynicism, even when cynical themselves.

Image: The Movie Database

Given that many people know American novels, to the extent that they know them, from the film versions (if any) more than from reading them, most people know Ernest Hemingway’s 1937 novel To Have and Have Not from Howard Hawks’ 1944 film, which introduced Lauren Bacall to a dazzled world and an equally bewitched Humphrey Bogart. At 19, she slinked across the screen, all hair and elbows, and delivered come-hither lines like “You know how to whistle, don’t you, Steve? You just put your lips together and blow.”

Less well known, unfortunately, is the 1950 remake, which happens to be a much more faithful adaption and therefore more pleasing to Hemingway and his readers. It’s ironic, then, that it uses a different title, The Breaking Point, probably in an effort to avoid unfair comparisons to the previous hit. Criterion has now issued that remake on Blu-ray for the delectation of fans of Hemingway, of excellent noir films, and of intense star John Garfield who, as always, is basically playing John Garfield.

by Bill Gibron

21 Aug 2017

In the  wake of Jerry Lewis’ passing, we revisit this article from 2009 highlighting the legendary comedian’s movie-making.


Photo: Mark Boster (Los Angeles Times / TNS)

Editor’s Note: Originally published 7 September 2009.

Jerry Lewis remains an elusive cinematic figure. For most, he’s a joke, the punchline to a slam on the foolish French, or the kooky caricature of a nerd screeching “HEY LAAAAADY!” at the top of their nasal voice. Others have a more proper perspective, recognizing both his work with former partner Dean Martin (they remain the biggest phenomenon and unquantifiable gold standard in the now dead art of night club entertainment) and his tireless efforts on behalf of muscular dystrophy (summed up by this weekend’s telethon). But when it comes to film, especially those he’s personally written and directed, he stays a fool, a jester as jerk de-evovling the artform into nothing more than senseless silly slapstick. It doesn’t matter that Lewis authored one of the standard textbooks on the craft (The Total Film-Maker, 1971), or conceived technical innovations that revolutionized the production process.

by Sarah Zupko

18 Aug 2017

How TABASCO hot  sauce is spicing up London's international BBQ scene.

BBQ is all the rage in hip, young London with amazing new restaurants opening all around town. From Bodean’s, the Blues Kitchen, and Smokestak to Zelman Meats and the Chicago Rib Shack, the capital is full of a wide range of approaches to BBQ.

Even better you can find BBQ from ethnic food traditions around the world. Whether it’s Nigerian or Filipino, Jamaican or American, Japanese Argentinian, London has your international BBQ covered.

by Sachyn Mital

18 Aug 2017

The Joshua  Tree tour highlights U2's classic album with an epic and unforgettable new experience.

The ‘80s were perhaps U2‘s greatest era, or at least, in mind, it had been. So seeing the band, Bono, the Edge, Adam Clayton, and Larry Mullen, Jr., perform the three-decade old epic Joshua Tree album in its entirety, with a few more of their so-called hits tossed in, was an incredible experience.

by PopMatters Staff

18 Aug 2017

This is a  track built on a formula, but no formula exists to account for Sandé, and her performance is the kind of vocal that you scream along to, tears in your eyes, heart ready to burst.

Mike Schiller: That “Funky Drummer” sample is the gift that keeps on giving. “Love Me More” might be the hundred-thousandth-ish song to sample James Brown’s classic ode to his percussionist, but it’s a great track nonetheless thanks to the energetic work of Emeli Sandé, who climbs to the sky with her vocal track. The strings follow her to the stratosphere, and it’s impossible to keep from getting sucked in. This is a track built on a formula, but no formula exists to account for Sandé, and her performance is the kind of vocal that you scream along to, tears in your eyes, heart ready to burst. [8/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

How It Slips Away: 'The Breaking Point' Crosses Hemingway With Noir

// Short Ends and Leader

"Whether we've seen or read the story before, we ache for these sympathetic, floundering people presented to us gravely and without cynicism, even when cynical themselves.

READ the article