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Monday, Sep 15, 2014
Norwegian singer/songwriter Sondre Lerche has a new album, Please, out next week, but you can stream it now courtesy of NPR.

Having already made the stellar tunes “Bad Law” and “Sentimentalist” available for stream Sondre Lerche has offered his newest LP, Please for listeners to stream in its entirety in the week leading up to its release, courtesy of NPR.


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Monday, Sep 15, 2014
Three dramas become entwined in the breathtakingly micro-epic folds of “Inklings.” But the one that ultimately makes the difference is the fourth—the drama you bring with you to these pages.

EXCLUSIVE PREVIEW


Think back some two years ago to The Unwritten: On to Genesis, because that’s where this issue of Unwritten Apocalypse picks up in Wilson Taylor’s timeline. Wilson had just done some dirty work for the Unwritten Cabal in New York and more or less invented the comics industry’s business model. He’d just barely ducked out from being tracked by the Cabal’s vicious hitman, Pullman (vicious, ostensible hitman, because in a few short chapters Pullman will be revealed as the secret director of Cabal’s activities).


Now, Wilson resurfaces in wartime England, and as a friend and confidant of the Inklings, the famous literary group that included JRR Tolkien and CS Lewis and Dorothy Sayers. But it would be The Unwritten if the story ended there.


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Monday, Sep 15, 2014
The enigmatic "Home for the Holidays" is a perfect sample of what's to come on Glass Ghost's new LP, LYFE.

The duo of Eliot Krimsky and Michael Johnson forms the core of the art pop outfit called Glass Ghost, whose associations include Dirty Projectors, Here We Go Magic, and Joan as Police Woman. The two are joined by Tyler Wood and Aerial East for LYFE, the latest full-length venture from Glass Ghost, following 2009’s Idol Omen.


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Monday, Sep 15, 2014
It's quite a long buildup before we get to know the realities of Bob Saginowski's past. Once delivered, however, it's too little, way too late.

You know it’s going to happen; you’re just not sure when. You can sense the story building up to it. So does the performance, measured out in ever increasing indications of suppressed violence. Still, he’s a decent guy. Soft spoken. Kind to animals. Not afraid to be loyal when necessary, while always happy to point out potential pitfalls in other’s knee-jerk reactions and schemes.


And there’s the inferences, the hints at secrets from the past being concealed and realities no longer discussed. This is Bob Saginowski, bartender at a local Brooklyn dive known as Cousin Marv’s. He is played by Tom Hardy, who is the only reason to give the otherwise ordinary crime thriller The Drop a look. The rest of the movie hopes to use the reputation of its writer to lure in the audience, but it won’t work.


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Monday, Sep 15, 2014
The third track on Green Day's 2004 opus blends its social commentary and coming-of-age narrative into a single explosion that's both powerful and profound.

Having properly set up both the social commentary and narrative construct of American Idiot with the disc’s first two pieces (“American Idiot” and “Jesus of Suburbia”), Green Day chose the most logical option for the next track: fuse the two agendas into one wholly kickass amalgam. Indeed, “Holiday” is among the most overtly political songs on the record, which is probably why it was such a big hit back in 2004. Likewise, it followed up on the defiant departure of the album’s protagonist, showcasing the next chapter in his journey. A decade later, “Holiday” is still just as catchy, invigorating, and collectively powerful, igniting a rebellious fire in the soul of everyone who hears it, as well as sparking discussions about its meanings.


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