{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by Christopher John Stephens

20 Jan 2017

Sharon Jones and  Woodie Guthrie knew: great songs belong to everybody.

Photo from Barbara Kopples' Miss Sharon Jones (2016)

Sometimes a singer’s work is too conveniently packaged. Is this one simply a stylist dedicated to carefully approximating their genre? Is that one an innovator? In the case of Sharon Jones, who died last November after a long battle with pancreatic cancer, the truth is somewhere else.

by PopMatters Staff

19 Jan 2017

"Hard Liquor" is  a contrived and affected attempt to meld some idea of bluesiness into his brand of so-called "PBR&B".

Andrew Paschal: The opening track and fourth single from Rennen is also its worst offering. The song is a contrived and affected attempt to meld some idea of bluesiness into his brand of so-called “PBR&B”. Its melody is uncomfortably familiar, sounding not so much like one song in particular as a whole slew of songs, each similarly caricatured and unsubtle. “My baby don’t make a sound / As long as her hard liquor’s never watered down,” he drawls in an on-the-nose attempt to recreate the feel of a seedy tavern. In addition to going for a postindustrial bar song, “Hard Liquor” also has a curious “heave-ho” kind of vibe to it, like a co-opted imitation of the songs people associate with tough, physical labor. Perhaps this is what you would get if you crossed Blade Runner with Holes. [4/10]

by Sarah Zupko

19 Jan 2017

If you can  imagine baroque pop translated into Americana, then you'll get an idea of Curtis McMurtry's unique contribution to the ever-growing Americana scene.

Curtis McMurtry has a famous Texas surname and, yes, he the son of legendary Texas singer-songwriter James McMurtry, but Curtis is very much his own man musically. If you can imagine baroque pop translated into Americana, then you’ll get an idea of Curtis McMurtry’s unique contribution to the ever-broadening definition of Americana music. McMurtry has been as influenced by great songwriting craftsmanship as he has by jazz, folk rock, indie pop, and orchestral pop.

by Diane Leach

19 Jan 2017

Ever wondered what  the difference between cinnamon and cassia is? The Encyclopedia of Spices and Herbs will teach you.

Don’t mistake The Encyclopedia of Spices and Herbs, written by Padma Laksmi with Judith Sutton and Kalustyans, for an advertisement. Yes, Lakshmi is a Food Network star with model looks, a high-profile divorce, and tell-all memoir. And yes, Kalustyan’s is a specialty market in New York City, famed for its spices.

As for Judith Sutton, hers is a name sharp-eyed cookbook readers come to recognize: the writer who often works the hardest, earns the least, and whose name tends to appear in the smallest print. An experienced cookbook author and co-author, Sutton’s name is reassurance that The Encyclopedia of Spices and Herbs is a serious work. At no time does the book push Kalyustan’s as a marketplace.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

That Ribbon of Highway: Sharon Jones Re-shapes Woody Guthrie's Song

// Sound Affects

"Sharon Jones and Woodie Guthrie knew: great songs belong to everybody.

READ the article