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by G. Christopher Williams

25 Jul 2016

This week we  discuss Jotun's presentation of Norse mythology through scale and grandeur.

Jotun arrived quietly last year, but the game is all about going big, reveling as it does in grandiosity and big, big boss fights.

This week we discuss Jotun‘s presentation of Norse mythology through scale and grandeur.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jul 2016

Steve Horowitz: Very nicely done! The Strokes take a low key approach to the music, and it pays off handsomely. The guitars shine through the haze, the drummer keeps the beat lively and the vocals are unpretentiously delivered with a smile. The band’s musical chops turn what could be an ordinary song into something special. The video has some fun moments as it plays with the conventions of heist films and greedy Wall Street pigs, but the “Threat of Joy” offers its own rewards. [9/10]

by Steve Leftridge

25 Jul 2016

Maybe The  Public Enemy is a swell dish. Or maybe it ain't so tough. The Steves take on the classic tale of beer and blood.

Steve Leftridge: Mr. Pick, you and I have just watched what many consider to be the quintessential gangster picture of the ‘30s from Warner Brothers: William Wellman’s The Public Enemy (1931). It’s also the film that made James Cagney famous. The film starts with a disclaimer from the studio that states its intention to honestly depict the “hoodlum” of the era and not to glorify him. I’d like to start by asking you how well you think the film accomplishes its stated goal of not romanticizing the criminal or his crimes.

by Eric Risch

22 Jul 2016

Think of Blesst  Chest as a Medeski Martin & Wood for the stoner set.

Photo: C. Collier

Encapsulating Black Sabbath, Jethro Tull, Dick Dale and Boston—whom guitarist Jay Winebrenner freely admits ripping off—in a span of less than three minutes, Portland, Oregon instrumental “micro prog” trio Blesst Chest has crafted its own theme song with “Blesst Chest Theme Song”.

by Will Rivitz

22 Jul 2016

Separation Anxiety  is an impressive collection of synthy goodness from the young band, synth twists and echoing guitar played straight for immediate effect.

Wrinkles make rootsy psychedelic rock with a revivalist kick, the kind of exquisitely-produced jams that have been bursting forth ever since Tame Impala broke through to mainstream consciousness. Separation Anxiety is an impressive collection of synthy goodness from the young band, synth twists and echoing guitar played straight for immediate effect. It lifts satisfying elements from the major trends in indie of late — Young the Giant’s pop savvy, Future Islands’ propensity for the anthemic, LCD Soundsystem’s spare misanthropy — and the result is an album well-studied and well-executed. It refines the wheel instead of reinventing it — and given the result, refining is plenty good.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Double Take: 'The Public Enemy' (1931)

// Short Ends and Leader

"Maybe The Public Enemy is a swell dish. Or maybe it ain't so tough. The Steves take on the classic tale of beer and blood.

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