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Monday, Apr 20, 2015
The billowy vocal harmonies and psychedelic visuals of Django Django's "Beginning to Fade" is an ideal aural and visual complement to 4/20, this highest of holidays.

With it being 4/20, many people truly are “Beginning to Fade”—if they aren’t already there yet. For those who haven’t done so yet, the music and visuals of this latest number by the South London rock outfit Django Django will prove a psychedelic and lovely detour on what for many people will be just an ordinary Monday interrupted by stoned people marauding through the streets.


“Beginning to Fade” is a track from Django Django’s forthcoming LP, Born Under the Sun.


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Monday, Apr 20, 2015
by Steve Leftridge and Steve Pick
Double Take looks at the men, the machine, the Moloch, the maiden, the master, and Metropolis as we attempt to find the intermediary heart between the Expressionism and politics.

With all its cinematic action, expressionistic designs, and thematic muddle, Metropolis is one of the easiest silent films to sell to contemporary audiences.


Steve Leftridge: Into the depths we go, brother. Oh, that Freder, with his lush hair and winged pantaloons and excruciatingly slow reaction times. Metropolis is rife with a few laughs it never intended to get, but when you compare it to the films of the same period—Chaplin’s The Kid, for instance, which we recently looked at for Double Take—it’s clear that Fritz Lang was working on a whole ‘nother level. Metropolis is remarkably ambitious in scope and design, and it covers timeless and sometimes scarily prescient themes and social concerns.


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Monday, Apr 20, 2015
Adam Schatz (of Landlady and Father Figures fame) takes on a tune by experimental saxophonist Jonah Parzen-Johnson in this mind-warping remix.

In the press materials for Jonah Parzen-Johnson’s forthcoming full-length, Remember When Things Were Better Tomorrow, the baritone saxophonist’s music is described as “lo-fi experimental folk music for solo baritone saxophone and analog synthesizer.” If that description makes anything clear, it’s that Parzen-Johnson doesn’t care much for musical labels, preferring instead to carve out unique sonic spaces that can only be described in oddball terms like the aforementioned genre word salad. Case in point: a new remix of his tune “If You Can’t Sleep, Just Shut Your Eyes”, made by Landlady and Father Figures band member Adam Schatz. Like Parzen-Johnson, Schatz has an acute ear for how to warp sounds; on this remix, he completely defamiliarizes the sound of the instruments, to the point that it’s difficult to say which sounds are coming from where when it’s all said and done. Such sonic experimentation is what makes composers like these two gentlemen exciting as musicians. There’s good reason to keep your ears ready for the June release of Remember When Things Were Better Tomorrow.


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Monday, Apr 20, 2015
Bluesy beer hall rock meets a sunny California vibe in the latest video by Los Angeles' own Ivory Deville, "White Lights".

Earlier this year, when PopMatters premiered Ivory Deville’s music video for “Dance Hall”, I wrote, “[The band] may call Los Angeles its home, but by the sound of “Dance Hall”... they’d fit in just as well in a Southern honky-tonk.” The same holds true for their latest music video for the tune “White Lights”, which finds blues and beer-soaked guitar riffs and solos merging with a California vibe that makes this group undoubtedly distinctive in their native ity of Angels.


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Monday, Apr 20, 2015
With the second season already in production, How to Get Away With Murder finds itself at a crossroads.

Shonda Rhimes’ How to Get Away With Murder is a show with a lot of hype behind it, and rightly so. It’s hard to deny the series’ first season didn’t make a strong impression. It threw together an awesome and diverse cast, a fun episodic formula, and a serialized mystery that definitely hangs with the best of them.


That said, it was How to Get Away With Murder’s blend of contemporary college drama and sprawling murder-mystery that stuck with me the most, because it evoked a fascinating set of similarities to Donna Tartt’s seminal campus-murder novel, The Secret History.


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