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Thursday, Apr 24, 2014
The frenetic Courtney Love is back, only this time she's using her solo name.

Courtney Love embarked on a solo tour last summer and during promised that new music would be coming soon. Well, that time is now. On May 4th we will be graced with the double A-side single for “You Know My Name” and “Wedding Day”. While we haven’t heard the latter, “You Know My Name” is a characteristically grungy track that harkens back to the much reviled America’s Sweetheart days, which is a much better album than is given credit.


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Thursday, Apr 24, 2014
by Kevin Korber
Guitarist Jesse Jenkins of noted Austin reverb-rockers Pure X opens up about the band's new album Angel and how their shift in style and attitude reinvigorated them as a band.

For a young band, the first album can be a bit of a curse.


While it’s great for a band to be praised right from the start, a great first album can be a bit of an albatross for a band; they can become hamstrung into sticking to one specific sound and style. It takes bravery to cast off that albatross and try something different, no matter what happens.


Pure X are such sorts of brave souls. The Austin-based indie rock band came out with their first album, Pleasure, in 2011, along with a sound and an aesthetic style that they could have easily been pigeonholed into for years. However, the band have taken steps with each album and tour to move farther away from their established sound, following their own muse instead of the outside perception of their music. With their third album, Angel, they’ve sought to shake things up a bit with clear, crisp, classic style that peels their layers of reverb and distortion away to let the songs take center stage.


As the band head out on a tour across the United States with fellow indie rockers Real Estate, we spoke to guitarist Jesse Jenkins about the band’s new sound, their shift in personnel, and the rigors of writing and performing on the road.


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Thursday, Apr 24, 2014
The '90s are back! With Meshell Ndegeocello, Courtney Love, Tori Amos and now Veruca Salt all on the cusp of releasing new records this year, this '90s music fanboy's heart is about to explode.

Something seriously dramatic happened with Veruca Salt back in 1998 that forced Nina Gordon to exit the band, leaving Louise Post all alone to take the helm. And while Nina’s solo career never felt like her, and Louise’s version of Veruca Salt did its best, there is no comparing the original quartet that rocked our little hearts with American Thighs and Eight Arms to Hold You.


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Thursday, Apr 24, 2014
Damon Albarn's got a new album arriving in a few days, and his band's most popular album commemorates its 20th birthday. What better time to pay tribute to the period when Blur put the "pop" in Britpop?

Nowadays, two of 1994’s main music-related events are symbolically inextricably linked: the death of Kurt Cobain and the rise of Britpop. Never mind that Pearl Jam and the other grunge bands continued to make records and sell millions for years following Cobain’s suicide—the myth that has arisen around the Britpop era is that its laddish optimism and nostalgic tunefulness were a much-needed respite from the gloom and sludge emanating from Seattle in the early ‘90s. Surely, 1994 was the year that Britpop really started to pick up steam: Suede was trying to consolidate the success that accompanied its debut album, Oasis and Elastica received a rapturous reception when they issued their insta-classic freshman LPs, and Blur positioned itself as the standard-bearer of British rock when it put out its career-resurrecting Parklife, which celebrates its 20th anniversary this week.


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Thursday, Apr 24, 2014
Wander through the house of Metal Gear and marvel at the marvelous and the grotesque.

This post contains spoilers for Metal Gear Solid: Ground Zeroes.


Playing Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes is like visiting an old friend’s new house. In this case, you’ve known the friend for 27 years (Megal Gear came out in 1987!). They’ve had plenty of time to accumulate the various pieces of furniture, wall art, and knick-knacks that define their various homes, and you’ve had plenty of time to form your expectations (there have been over a dozen Metal Gear games!). So here you are, standing in the foyer of Metal Gear Solid V: Ground Zeroes. What do you see?


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