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Friday, Apr 18, 2014
They don't like a man in uniform.

One fine day, Massimo (Ray Lovelock) tells his mom not to wait up for him. Then he goes out, puts on a ski mask, and bungles an attempted robbery of a jewelry store. When he’s thrown in prison with a local drug kingpin (Martin Balsam), we begin to suspect there’s more to the story, and these feelings are confirmed by a flashback and helpful expository dialogue. The plot’s twists include a break-out and eventual arrival in Genoa on the Riviera, where third-billed Elke Sommer finally shows up as a gangster’s moll who likes Massimo because he’s such a blond heart-throb who loves his mother.


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Friday, Apr 18, 2014
Look at her looking.

L’Immortelle begins as it means to continue: a series of fragmentary, disorienting scenes of a man gazing helplessly upon a fetishized, smiling, mysterious woman in a variety of locations around Istanbul. The opening montage of shots create an imaginary time and space through editing of glances and gestures across obviously disparate moments. The result is dreamlike and obsessive in very sharp, arid black and white. If these first moments don’t warn you away, you are helplessly under the movie’s spell. The rest of the film expands these scenes without explaining them: a man has a series of frustrating encounters, and evidently a sexual affair, with an elusive woman who might possibly be a spirit. At the very least, she’s a Symbol.


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Friday, Apr 18, 2014
Get a horse.

Sparke (Lon McCallister) is a troubled teen orphan who’s not big on school and had brushes with the law. After the death of an aunt who’d been raising him (his mother having died in childbirth), he’s packed off to the languishing horse ranch of another aunt (Charlotte Greenwood, who vanishes halfway through the picture) and her dour husband, “Thunder” Bolt (Walter Brennan), nursing his wounded memories of past glory as a breeder and racer. They have one blind mare called Lady. Sparke loves horses and decides to stay.


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Friday, Apr 18, 2014

Back in the late ‘40s, as America was emerging from World War II, the Walt Disney company decided to do something daring. In deference to their fans who loved the fluffy fun animated efforts, the House of Mouse experimented, sending filmmakers out into the wild to capture nature as it was (or at the very least, how it was before it was cinematically shifted and manipulated). The films, beginning with Seal Island, were a massive success, and soon Buena Vista International’s True-Life Adventures brand became synonymous with high quality documentaries. The studio would even go on to win several Oscars for such subjects as The Living Desert, The Vanishing Prairie, and The White Wilderness and create dozens of educational shorts to use in classroom and other instructional settings (like NBC’s Sunday Night tradition, The Wonderful World of Disney).


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Friday, Apr 18, 2014
Cloud Nothings helped Connecticut let loose some angst at a wild-all ages show.

Cloud Nothings fourth album Here and Nowhere Else is a barn-burner. This band, with Dylan Baldi on guitar and vocals, TJ Duke on bass and Jayson Gerycz behind the drums, has been moving up in the music scene quickly, having started out as a quieter indie rock outfit in 2009 but now unleashing their energy via frantic noise-rock, verging on punk. I decided to see the band perform in Connecticut rather than either of their New York City shows because this one, put on by Manic Productions the go-to guy for music, was all-ages and at The Space in Hamden, a basement-like venue that can be pretty dark and since CT has had a burgeoning local punk scene. New Yorkers may crowd surf at Death By Audio but I can’t imagine they would at Bowery Ballroom or Music Hall of Williamsburg. The Space was the place to watch people give themselves whiplash.


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