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Monday, Jul 28, 2014
Arriving right at the peak of summer is "Silver Lining", a tune just perfect for the beach by the San Francisco indie outfit City Tribe.

The most popular indie rock of recent years, from the psychedelic washes of Tame Impala to the sunny vocal harmonies of Fleet Foxes, has always found the most comfort in the warm rays of summer heat. Joining groups such as these is the San Francisco-based City Tribe, who with its latest tune, “Silver Lining”, balances melancholy subject matter with music that would find a fitting home at the sands of a beach.


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Monday, Jul 28, 2014
The newest tune by the Atlanta folk/pop outfit Seven Handle Circus, "And We Danced", perfectly balances pop harmony with bluegrass melancholy.

The Atlanta folk-poppers that call themselves Seven Handle Circus are yet another piece of evidence that reveals just how versatile the bluegrass instrumental lineup can be. With a guitar, banjo, mandolin, fiddle, bass, and drums, the group creates harmony-centric pop that grabs the ear right upon first listen, all the while maintaining a rustic quality inherent to the instruments being played.


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Monday, Jul 28, 2014
Why is it that broader culture doesn't give victims of disaster and trauma the choice to say "No?"

In 1994, not long after Susan Smith was arrested and convicted of drowning her two children in John Long Lake in South Carolina, her estranged husband, David Smith, sat down for an exclusive, one-on-one television interview. The interview was emotional and traumatizing. 


And completely unnecessary. 


Still, I’m not at all surprised that it happened.


Tagged as: reality tv
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Monday, Jul 28, 2014
Nowhere else in their discography have the B-52's made such a blatant song about having sex (which is to say nothing of their use of the word "Herculaneum").

Turn on that lava lamp ... ‘cause things are gonna get a little sexy up in here.


An ongoing theme to this extensive Behind the Grooves series on one of the most perfect pop albums ever created, the B-52’s eponymous debut from 1979, is how with its raw production and performances that completely commit to the absurdism in the lyrics, there is an immediate, potent effect that is achieved with each and every one of these songs, as if the band somehow congealed out melted platform shoes and tacky lamps in order to become a perfect antithesis to disco’s self-serious sanctimony, favoring the gritty instead of the lush and wacky instead of the romantic. They were art-pop weirdos on the crest of the New Wave wave, and because they believed so wholeheartedly in their songs about rock lobsters and creatures coming from Planet Claire, they exuded a confidence that they were never able to recapture, as on this disc and this disc alone, they created a world that was inhabited only by the B-52’s and their lucky listeners. As an album, The B-52’s worked because it played its own internal logic that’s simultaneously indecipherable and also completely relatable in its own wacky way.


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Monday, Jul 28, 2014
Check out the latest video from the doomy rockers the Grayces, the scuzzy "Lord and Gods of Alcohol".

There is a certain swampiness to the rock and roll purveyed in by the Nashville-based the Grayces. Despite the rock revival leanings that the band’s name might hint at, this trio’s closest sonic kin at the moment is the up-and-coming occult rock trend. No track is better evidence of this than the newest cut to come forth from the soon-to-be-released Westing, “Lord and Gods of Alcohol”.


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