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Latest Blog Posts

by Mantas Krisciunas

6 Dec 2016

We realized that there is a decent amount of opposition towards video games in the church, particularly from older members. I wanted to have a place where Mormon gamers could talk about games without feeling ostracized or belittled. For almost a year it was just me and zoomop on my old account until about a year ago LDSG_ghost approached me. He had made a similar community elsewhere and wanted to combine them. 
—TheKaelen, moderator of /r/ldsgamers.

Video games aren’t yet known for their portrayal of the full spectrum of human diversity. While the medium is arguably making slow progress when it comes to race, gender and sexuality, other building blocks of a person’s identity are still waiting to be tackled. One of those is religion.

by Michael Barrett

6 Dec 2016

James Thurber’s 1942 story “The Catbird Seat” is one of the crueler classics in the American canon. It’s a revenge story in which a mild-mannered accountant, one of the army of faceless and unimaginative cogs organized into the corporate wheels, decides to kill an efficiency expert whose decisions are causing lay-offs and streamlined procedures that threaten his dull world. Since the expert is a woman, there’s an inevitable sense of the sexist fear of women in the previously male domain of the workplace. From the accountant’s point of view, she’s presented as an interloper of annoying mannerisms and phrases, like her use of “catbird seat”.

This story is filmed more or less faithfully while being transferred to Edinburgh: “A man’s world, a world in which the shortest skirts are worn by man” declares the narrator (Sam Wanamaker). In the clothing firm called MacPherson Tweeds, the cloth is hand-woven by families in the Hebrides and nothing has changed since the company was founded by the current owner’s grandfather. The latest MacPherson (Robert Morley) falls under the spell of outgoing American consultant Angela Barrows (Constance Cummings), who begins modernizing and updating the systems of filing, accounting and manufacture.

by Jessy Krupa

5 Dec 2016

“Lucifer was bad enough when he had a plan, a motive. Now he’s just having fun.”
Sam Winchester

When we last saw Lucifer (Rick Springfield), his body was rapidly decaying as Rowena (Ruth Connell) banished him to “the bottom of the bloody ocean”. So you might be wondering just how he could be the center of this week’s episode? As it turns out, all it takes is a devil-worshiping teen (Jeff Evans Todd) and a “Lucifer feather” purchased off of the Internet. Lucifer instantly appears in the teen’s basement, and snaps the necks of his devotees before revealing that these feathers have the power to heal him, but only for a little while

by G. Christopher Williams

5 Dec 2016

This week we return to one of our first episodes of the podcast, a time when we were focusing on how different narrative genres are represented in video games. A focus on combat seems a reasonable enough one in beginning an exploration of the specific types of stories told in games. After all, given gaming’s tendency towards competitiveness rather than co-operation, many modern games find the battlefield an apt enough place to tell stories.

This podcast was hosted by Rick Dakan, and included Moving Pixels contributors, G. Christopher Williams, Nick Dinicola, and Thomas Cross.

by Nick Dinicola

2 Dec 2016

The Cube Escape games are series of free puzzle games on iOS and Android. I downloaded them all at the same time (because, free), but after getting through the first one, I wanted to delete the rest immediately. Instead, I played a few more of the games, just to see if the puzzle design might improve. After all, maybe that first game was awkward and bad because it was actually someone’s first game. Turns out, they don’t get better, and I kind of hate them all. Yet I kept playing. Eventually I broke down… and played the rest with a walkthrough open beside me. I wasn’t going to try and solve these shitty puzzles on my own. I was just going to get through the games as fast as possible. Because even though I kind of hated them, I was also hooked on them.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Searching for Wholesome Online Fun: LDS Gamers

// Moving Pixels

"While being skeptical about the Church ever officially endorsing video games, LDS gamers remains hopeful about the future, knowing that Mormon society is slowly growing to appreciate gaming.

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