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by Mehan Jayasuriya

20 Nov 2009

If there was a checklist for Eels archetypes, “Little Bird”, the first track to see the light of day from the band’s forthcoming LP End Times, would fill up more check boxes than just about any other song that E has penned. A simple, delicately strummed melody with a capo at the fifth fret? Check. Direct appeals to God? Check. An avian-centric narrative? Check. Gratuitous use of the word “goddamn”? Check. Pining for a lost love? Double check.

That said, this is also quite possibly the best song that E has written since the landmark Daisies of the Galaxy. A spare, crushingly depressing, brutally honest confessional, the track finds E doing what he does best: moping. One listen to E’s gravelly voice as he admits, “Goddamn, I miss that girl”, should be enough to convince even the weariest of Eels fans that End Times just might be worth looking forward to.

Download the song using the widget below…

by Bill Gibron

20 Nov 2009

Holiday films earn their place as categorical ‘classics’ in a couple of significant ways. The first is in the standard language of film itself. They’re funny or sweet, dramatic or creatively compelling, outside of the need to express a certain seasonal sentiment. Naturally, the next element in play is the found festive value. Either a movie encompasses what you feel about Easter, or Halloween, or Christmas, or it misses the emotional benchmark by miles.

And then there are those titles that transcend both, to combine solid (if now sketchy) cinematic value with precise focused celebratory fellowship to make all other offerings pale in comparison. Just in time for Noel 2009, Paramount is putting out a pair of these timeless attempts: White Christmas and It’s a Wonderful Life.

While they’ve been released and re-released any number of times, Paramount’s attention to added content details and final visual polish makes either title a must-own. It’s a Wonderful Life comes in a dimensional box featuring a commemorative tree ornament, as well as a chance at eight free holiday MP3 downloads.

Inside, you will get both the bold monochrome and the unnecessary colorized version of the film, as well as a documentary on its making and a tribute to Capra by his son. White Christmas, on the other hand, is overloaded with bonus features. There is a commentary from the late great Ms. Clooney, a collection of backstage recollections, an overview on each of the main actors involved, and a chance to see the new theatrical version of the film come to life onstage (the live version is currently in previews around the country). As a means of remembering that special someone this gift giving season, either digital package is just perfect.

AMAZON: It’s a Wonderful Life
AMAZON: White Christmas (Anniversary Edition)

by Sachyn Mital

20 Nov 2009

The question of the night for El Ten Eleven was “Why aren’t you playing bigger venues?”  The groovy electro-funk duo made their first ever Philadelphia tour stop at the Khyber Bar in front of a very appreciative but small crowd.  The bar itself was cozy and, as hinted, a small place—making it a great place to see bands up close while downing dollar PBR’s.

by Tyler Gould

20 Nov 2009

This song won me over in about 3 seconds with its springy guitar, and though some might find Olof Arnalds’ oohing a little too bold, a little too Doris Day, I find it all the more idyllic. This is the musical equivalent of Snow White’s friendly forest animals. I don’t know what she’s saying, but it sounds warm and earnest, like she has my best interests in mind.

Ólöf Arnalds
Englar og dárar [MP3]
     

by Mehan Jayasuriya

20 Nov 2009

On Wednesday night, Savannah, Georgia metal act Baroness kicked off its fall tour at the Rock and Roll Hotel in Washington D.C.  Living up to their reputation for outstanding live shows, the four-piece brought to the stage nearly every quality that makes Blue Record one of the year’s best metal albums: bone-crunching riffs, anthemic vocals, hushed interludes, driving rhythms, and guitar acrobatics galore.  But it was the band’s delivery and onstage chemistry, rather than their technical skill, that won over the packed room.  Finger-pulls and pinch harmonics usually seem like hard work, but that wasn’t the case with Baroness.  For such serious musicians, it looked like they were having a lot of fun. 

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'SUPERHOTLine Miami' Is Exactly What It Sounds Like

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