{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

10 Dec 2009

PopMatters Sponsor

PopMatters Sponsor

Fuse is counting down the top hits of the year. Fans voted at Fuse.tv for their favorite songs and the ultimate viewers choice will debut at number one in the Top 40 of 09: The Year in Music. Tune in Saturday, December 12th at 4pm ET. An encore will air Sunday at 12pm ET.

by Andrew Martin

10 Dec 2009

“Hang You From the Heavens” is perhaps most representative of how you would expect the Dead Weather to sound. Jack White demolishes the drum kit, particularly the hi-hats, while Dean Fertita and Jack Lawrence hit a slew of grimy notes and tones. As if that’s not enough, Alison Mosshart’s sexy-as-hell vocals make the track worthy of a cigarette break. It might not be the best track off Horehound, but it’s certainly up there.

by Jennifer Cooke

10 Dec 2009

Reviewing Robbie Williams’ new CD Reality Killed the Video Star made me feel a) a bit guilty that I couldn’t give it an unmitigated rave even though I am a huge fan, and b) nostalgic for his earlier brilliance. Since 2009 is almost over, I can just get in under the wire to pay homage to the 10-year anniversary of our first taste of Robbie on these shores: The Ego Has Landed.

A decade ago, Williams was just another boy band refugee gone solo. Take That was a bona fide phenomenon in its native UK and almost every other pop-loving country in the world, but the US never cottoned to ‘em—a fate largely shared by Williams himself to this day. It was difficult to shake the prefab pretty-boy stigma, and some might say he never has—Noel Gallagher still gets mileage from a quote from 2000 when he called Williams “the fat dancer from Take That”. Credibility has been hard to come by, regardless of the dizzying success Williams has experienced worldwide.

So I feel it’s best to let the music speak for itself. The Ego Has Landed is actually a compilation of Williams’ first two albums, which were not released domestically, Life Thru a Lens and I’ve Been Expecting You. It came out in May 1999 and spawned his two biggest hits stateside, “Millennium” and “Angels” (the latter sparking a slew of cover versions by artists including Jessica Simpson and American Idol alum David Archuleta).  The album got 3.5 stars and a glowing review from Rob Sheffield where he called it “easily the kickiest Elton John-style album anyone has made since George Michael’s Faith, packed with Vegas flash, disco beats, rock energy and hipster wit.”  And I don’t know about you, but I think Rob Sheffield knows a thing or two about pop music.

by Alan Ranta

10 Dec 2009

While the R. Kelly/Jay-Z collaboration failed miserably, the vinyl-only “Moth/Wolf Cub” single showed that bizarre genre crossovers could work. Four Tet was one of the primary founders of folktronica and Burial was one of the names that made dubstep the household name it now is. Locked in a room together, their sounds combined in a breathtaking fashion. Burial’s patient beats roll on smoothly under Four Tet’s ethereal cut-up loops. “Moth” is significantly subdued and minimal, but the B-side “Wolf Cub” is where the partnership really cooks, beginning with a distinctly Four Tet-sounding, diced hand piano and evolving to include Burial’s stuttering beat and moody atmosphere. It would be nice to hear more come out of this. 

by Steve Horowitz

10 Dec 2009

Columbia/Legacy commemorates the 40th anniversary of Janis Joplin’s appearance at the Woodstock Music & Arts Fair and her first solo album, I Got Dem Ol’ Kozmic Blues Again Mama!, after departing from Big Brother and the Holding Company with a two-fer entitled Janis Joplin: The Woodstock Experience. The title connotes peace, love, and flowers and all those groovy things the fest was supposed to stand for as a cultural beacon. The reality of Janis at Woodstock was a much different experience. Joplin may not fit the Woodstock myth, as she and her music were always much more grounded in troubles than good times. But the reality of Joplin at the Woodstock Festival is more compelling than any fairy tale. And the album she released just a few months afterwards shows that she was still making excellent music. This set will make an insightful educational gift for anyone dabbling in the blues or music from the ‘60s.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Anticipation and Expectation in Game Marketing: The Art of “Anti-Hype”

// Moving Pixels

"Watch the trailer for No Man's Sky and then for Frostpunk. There is a clear difference in the kind of expectations each creates in its audience.

READ the article