{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by Alex Suskind

29 Jan 2010

Dreams in Static
Serene Poetic
Shempseed
Releasing: 2 Februrary

Where experimental hip-hop meets psychedelic rock, you will find Dreams in Static, a Brooklyn-based duo on the verge of releasing their debut album, Serene Poetic. Awash in layered harmonies, sharp analog synths, reverbed guitars, and dense drumbeats, the record—which will be released on 2 February—is as peaceful as it is haunting.

Dreams in Static is the brainchild of Diwon, a hip-hop producer from New York, and Dugans, a guitarist from Texas. For this project, the two combine their respective musical backgrounds to form one cohesive sound. Diwon, who plays drums and synths on the record, is deeply influenced by his Yemenite background (where his mother’s family originates). By blending a Middle Eastern flair with a classic hip-hop sound, he provides the backbone to Serene Poetic. Dugans adds his own flair with ambient guitar riffs, amplified by a unique brand of effects, to perfectly complement Diwon’s dark beats. While Serene Poetic may be all instrumental, there are also plans to release an album with vocals in the near future.

SONG LIST
01 If on a Winter
02 The Ineffable
03 Day/Night
04 Notes From Under
05 Invisible Man
06 The Border/The Sun
07 Theta
08 Magic Carpet
09 Heartbreaking Work
10 American Pastoral
11 Befallen By Dreams
12 Kingdom Come
13 Lost/Forgotten
14 Standing in Shadows
15 Recurrent Dreams
16 Waking
17 Crescent Shape
18 Murmered Rhymes
19 Eighty Six
20 A Farewell Too
21 Disquietude
22 What You Did feat. Dov

 

by Conrad Hughes

29 Jan 2010

Circa Survive announced today on their official website some tour dates for March in the US to accompany their new album, currently being mixed by Rich Costey.

The album is currently untitled but should be out by the summer. Here’s the official video to “The Difference Between Medicine and Poison Is the Dose” to tide you over. Of course, you’d have to listen to it about 65,000 times for it to actually last you until the album releases, but you get the idea.

Here’s the dates:
3/11/10- Carrboro, NC @ Cat’s Cradle
3/12/10- Nashville, TN @ Exit/ In
3/13/10- Birmingham, AL @ WorkPlay Theatre
3/14/10- Little Rock, AR @ The Village
3/16/10- San Antonio, TX @ White Rabbit
3/17/10-3/21/10- Austin, TX (SXSW festival) @ TBD
3/22/10- St. Louis,MO @ The Firebird
3/23/10- Indianapolis, IN @ The Emerson Theater
3/24/10- Cleveland Heights, OH @ Grog Shop
3/26/10- HOODWINK Anaheim, CA @ Grove of Anaheim
3/27/10- THE BAMBOOZLE Anaheim, CA @ The Festival Grounds at Angels Stadium

by Bill Gibron

28 Jan 2010

They used to be the best part of the moviegoing experience, one of the few ways to learn what was “coming soon” to a theater near you. In fact, a Saturday at the matinee was never complete without a least a dozen sneak previews. They have now evolved into plotpoint specific spoilers where, more time than not, the entire narrative is spelled out in two minutes, thirty or less. It the past, they could be accused of some substantial bait and switch, filmic fraud in both the inducement and in factum. Now, we marvel at the overwhelming optical splendor and quick-cut editorial ruse, not recognizing that knowing too much is just as bad as being fooled once you buy your ticket and take your seat.

Some may argue that trailers are a dying art. Others will suggest that old school advertising was just as obvious and sneaky as its modern equivalent. Still, there is an inherent intrigue in seeing how movies made before the dawn of all this multimedia hyperbole did their carnival barker best to lure audiences into the Bijou. Enter Stephen Romano and his “Shock Festival”. Based on his famed book about the exploitation and horror movie scene from the ‘70s and ‘80s, his knowledge of the genre is matched only by his fandom for all things flesh/frightening. As a result, he has collected three DVDs worth of sensational schlock adverts, each one arguing for its value as publicity and pulp.

by Gregg Lipkin

28 Jan 2010

By the end of 1975 it was clear that the Parliament-Funkadelic funk mob, headed by its godfather George Clinton, was anything but an ordinary musical unit.  Clinton had overseen the recording of two albums in 1975, the second of which, Funkadelic’s Let’s Take It to the Stage, was a simultaneous slap in the face and kiss on the mouth of R&B music.  Featuring screaming guitars, subtle politics, and a sound that blurred the color lines, it made Funkadelic Masters of the Form, and in 1976, with the release of the classic Mothership Connection, Funkadelic’s sister-band Parliament joined them.

Clinton had playfully made fun of James Brown on the title track of Let’s Take It to the Stage, but in doing so he had done more than simply “taken him on”.  He had suggested that he was the new godfather; that his was the new funk, and he utilized many of Brown’s own foot soldiers to win a funk turf war that most music fans probably never saw coming.  In 1976, Parliament was a frighteningly fierce musical unit.  Fred Wesley and Maceo Parker, on trombone and saxophone respectively, had joined their former JBs band mate Bootsy Collins.  They helped Clinton improve upon Parliament’s previous experiment, 1975’s Chocolate City, and record Mothership Connection—a bible of groove that changed the course of black music forever.

by John Lindstedt

28 Jan 2010

When Saturday Night Live‘s Andy Samberg’s digital short “Lazy Sunday” hit the airwaves in 2005, it quickly became a huge viral sensation, spawning both imitators and countless more Samberg productions. The trend probably reached it’s apex this summer with Incredibad, the debut album of Samberg’s group the Lonely Island.

If you’re like most people, you’ve probably heard the album’s breakout track, “I’m on a Boat”, so many times it’s not even funny anymore, if it ever was. Like a majority of things on SNL, the digital shorts became more formulaic and repetitive with each outing.

No one has expressed this sentiment better than the New York-based production company, Landline TV. Landline‘s short film “Landline Digitial Short” skewers Samberg, his pals, and his process. It’s a pretty dead on parody, and definitely worth checking out.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Fire Emblem Heroes' Is a Bad Crossover

// Moving Pixels

"Fire Emblem Heroes desperately and shamelessly wants to monetize our love for these characters, yet it has no idea why we came to love them in the first place.

READ the article