{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by Bill Gibron

22 Feb 2010

Somewhere, the marketing executives behind Cop Out are laughing. Or rubbing their hands together in greedy anticipation. Or praying that none of the recent fat flap between the noted indie director and Southwest Airlines rubs off negatively on their upcoming buddy comedy. In a move that seems more based on friendship than box office bankability, star Bruce Willis got his buddy Kevin Smith to helm a film he had nothing to do with. He didn’t create the jaunty police laugher. He didn’t craft the script (something he has done on every previous film he’s made). He basically came on as a filmmaker for hire. Now, thanks to weight and the way in which the flying industry function circa 2010, Smith has become part of a plateau he rarely frequents - the tabloid-rich realm of TMZ

On the 19 February episode of Bill Maher’s Real Time, the jocular host took the noted filmmaker to task, arguing that fat people basically need to nut up or shut up. In essence, Maher’s point was that, if you normally have to abide by a surreal set of size rules (obese flyers frequently have to buy two seats to travel on major carriers these days) you shouldn’t complain when you try and circumvent them. Specifically, Smith had two seats booked on another flight, saw he could take an earlier standby departure, and then Tweeted about being asked to leave the plane when the pilot declared him - and his one seat - a security risk. The entire episode became one of those drawn out slow news day featured stories of the 24 hour cycle, pulling in everyone from the pro-porcine movement (which Maher also chastised) to those who think all chubby people ‘suck’.

by John Lindstedt

22 Feb 2010

In Increasingly Poor Decisions of Todd Margaret, David Cross writes and stars as the title character stuck in corporate hell. The pilot, also starring Will Arnett and Spike Jonze, was produced for England’s Channel 4 and was recently picked up for a full season order. Thankfully, us Yanks can still catch the pilot on our side of the pond without worrying about ever escalating baggage fees:

by Christian John Wikane

22 Feb 2010

Nona Hendryx illustrates just how much mightier the word is than the sword in “The Ballad of Rush Limbaugh”, her response to the right-wing pundit’s remarks in the wake of the earthquake in Haiti. “I’ve been so pissed off with Rush Limbaugh (for a long time) and his insensitive, racist commentary,” she says. “The final straw was his ill chosen or mean/hateful comments about American relief efforts for Haiti. So instead of just fuming and ranting myself, I wrote a song.” Felicia Collins, the guitarist for David Letterman’s house band, joins Hendryx on guitar.

The acclaimed singer-songwriter-funk rock innovator concocts some memorable couplets. “You chose your airwaves to spread your disease,” Hendryx hisses, “To kick the people already down on their knees.” Count how many dart holes puncture Limbaugh’s smug visage.

Listeners can visit CD Baby or iTunes to download the song. Proceeds will benefit the American Red Cross, Doctors Without Borders, and UNICEF.

by Shawn O'Rourke

22 Feb 2010

I confess that for years I was one of those readers that sometimes read through a comic book without paying as much attention to the artwork as I did to the writing. This was no doubt due to a combination of my laziness as a reader, and the sometimes formulaic approach some artists take to their work.

by Jacqueline Howell

22 Feb 2010

Tortoise’s wide ranging, if short, February American tour greeted an eager crowd at Toronto’s Lee’s Palace (their lone Canadian stop) on Thursday February 18th. The show was intensely focused while remaining expertly loose, as their signature experimental, post-rock, jazz flowed with almost no introduction, interruption or chatter. Touring on the strength of their 2009 album, Beacons of Ancestorship, Tortoise’s show also heavily featured tracks from the older TNT, a setlist choice that was embraced by the crowd. Highlights included “Swung from the Gutters” (which still seems like it needs to be featured in a soundtrack to a Tarantino-esque movie), the still hot, dynamic title track, “TNT” (to which the packed crowd could only nod appreciatively although many of us wanted to dance), and “I Set My Face to the Hillside” with its evocative mood of an otherworldly Spaghetti Western. The new up-tempo single, rock based and typically cheekily-titled, “Prepare Your Coffin”, introduced new layers to the established tones of TNT. The music, whether a short, three minute track or seven minute epic, always seemed to evoke a unique mood and feeling, a mini narrative. All of this music flowed seamlessly through a set that saw band members switch instruments and positions on the suddenly miniscule-looking stage (which was dominated by two drum kits front and centre that faced each other, a nice thouch of further symmetry). Though there was hardly a word spoken to the crowd throughout the set, the musicians, like their wordless musical storytelling, spoke well for themselves, easily drawing the same enthusiasm as many a posturing rocker has clumsily begged for. The only complaint about a near perfect show is that the big sounds of Tortoise were criminally underserved in the confines of a medium sized rock venue like Lee’s.  In a perfect scenario they would always, and only, exist in midsummer at mid-evening of an open air music festival with space enough for the masses that should experience this event.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Doctor Who': Casting a Woman as the Doctor Offers Fresh Perspectives and a New Kind of Role Model

// Channel Surfing

"The BBC's announcement of Jodie Whittaker as the first female Doctor has sections of fandom up in arms. Why all the fuss?

READ the article