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by C.L. Chafin

17 Feb 2009

Killer tofu be damned. Odds are that over the next few years, when the world hears “The Beets”, they’ll think of these fuzzed out pop kids from Brooklyn, and not the bunch of blue-faced Beatles rip-offs from Doug

The below video, for “Walk on Your Toes”, may just feature Juan Wauters, a third of the band, but it perfectly captures the Beets’ sound.  It’s so low-fi you have to dig it up to hear it, but give it half a chance and you’ll have it stuck in your head the rest of the day/week/month. Still, guys, you might up the production values just a smidge. You’ll still have cred, and we might actually be able to hear what you’re doing.

by Joe Tacopino

17 Feb 2009

Austin’s the Strange Boys have a wildly psychedelic sound with guitarist/singer Ryan Sambol’s quivering voice exuding equal amounts Southern twang and bare-boned insecurity. The Strange Boys are relatively obscure but this won’t last for long as the band prepares their debut LP in anticipation for their hometown SXSW festival next month. Check out the jangle and swagger of “Heard You Wanna Beat Me Up” from The Strange Boys… And Girls Club.

The Strange Boys
“Heard You Wanna Beat Me Up” [MP3]
     

by Katrina-Kasey Wheeler

17 Feb 2009

Gavin Rossdale is accustomed to success.

After all, he was catapulted to stardom in the mid-‘90s as the lead vocalist and guitarist of Bush, one of the most successful alt-rock bands of the time, enjoying commercial achievement with hits such as “Glycerine” and “The Chemicals Between Us”.  Wanderlust—his first-ever solo outing—proves that despite time away from the music scene, he can hit the ground running and conquer the world once again.

Rossdale who has said in past interviews: “I feel like a racehorse that’s been stuck in the stables a bit too long. The doors are locked and no one can find the key—worse I’m not sure who’s looking for it.”  As such, he’s tried creating a new sound. Rossdale’s approach to songwriting has not drastically changed insomuch that his lyrics are as introspective as ever; but if you are expecting to hear Bush-like bass lines—think again. Wanderlust is much more laissez-faire than his previous days with Bush and Institute.  In order to explore different musical avenues and gain a new perspective, Rossdale employed the skills of producer Bob Rock, the mastermind behind records for Metallica, Aerosmith, and Motley Crue. Rossdale and his band recorded eighteen songs in a mere five days, and the band’s work ethic has paid off, yielding the hit radio smash “Love Remains the Same.”

As one half of the power couple that is Gavin Rossdale and Gwen Stefani—it is nearly impossible for Rossdale to escape the ever-present paparazzi. With the new album and a burgeoning family, it is difficult to maintain a private life.  As Rossdale explains, “It can be annoying and it is nearly impossible to maintain a private life. The Paparazzi are like mosquitoes. There are so many more important things in life to pursue.” While making strides in evading the constant glare from the media and welcoming a new child into the family, Rossdale has created a notable addition to his library of work with Wanderlust.

by L.B. Jeffries

16 Feb 2009

Ralph Koster coined the term ‘game grammar’ to describe the basic systems that the average gamer becomes familiar with and relies on when trying a new game. The skills involved in moving in a 3-D space, the way interactive objects behave (as opposed to static ones), and just a fundamental grasp of game stats are all things a player learns and then relies on when trying new games. Indeed, as the smoke clears and the initial skirmishes of the console war settle into the long march Nintendo’s victory is being attributed to the fact that they invented a console which excels at teaching these mechanics to new gamers. Far from being simply casual, Nintendo has instead created a system that is playable by people who have never touched a video game in their life but would like to. Although there is still some contention on figuring out what this newfound audience wants to play, it occurred to me that perhaps we could begin work on bridge games that might draw them into the more complex genres. Lacking the ability to actually make said games, I thought I’d opt for the next best thing and try to explain the basics of gameplay to someone who has only played Wii Sports at this point in their development.

 

Moving in 3-D Spaces: In a video game you’re typically in charge of both your avatar and the camera observing him. You’re welcome to think of yourself as the “director & actor” but that’s kind of meta. Being able to maintain a decent angle on your character that lets you see the most information is the best camera angle, so it’s better to imagine that you’re a very bad cinematographer and a very good stuntman. Some games simplify this by making themselves a “First-Person” game in which your camera is lodged in your character’s skull, but those get tricky because you have to precisely aim the camera at the person you want to kill. Left analog stick controls your movement, right analog stick controls your camera. You’re always going to be pressing or moving your character in most games, so navigating in 3-D Spaces is mostly learning when it’s time to change your view.

Taking Damage: In order to help connect you to your surroundings and develop a meaningful relationship with the things in a video game, designer often make it so they can kill you. Activities that can kill you often correspond to their real life counterparts and thanks to several advances in animating these moments will often gratuitously resemble them. If the character you are moving around is slapped with a brick, this will adversely affect their health just like it would affect yours if this happened in real life. Unlike real life, you will typically be able to absorb a large but still finite amount of visually accurate injuries.

Health: Rather than correspond to a medically or physiologically sound concept of health, games tend to think of health like a pizza. Taking damage means a certain number of slices are taken away. Yet also like pizza, slices can be replaced very easily and generically since it’s all just pizza anyways. When the pizza is gone, you will be forced to revert back to a moment in the game when you still had some pizza. Various games will allow you to replenish your pizza through items in-game that you either step on or go to a “menu” to use. Newer games, realizing that this is very troublesome for new gamers, have made it so your pizza will just grow back.

Missions: The purpose or goal of a game can vary wildly and may involve paying attention to the plot. A group of high-profile Existentialists initiated a Humanist Ontological Movement back in the early 90’s to break the nihilistic pain worshippers that came from the elitest arcade scene. These people sought to apply an outside logic to the meaningless chaos of beeping and pixels that constituted most video games. Adopting a narrative structure similar to our own psychological need to think of things as stories, these games created “missions” that the player would perform and then receive the existential leap of being released of their mortal coil and experiencing life free of all purpose, all non-purpose, and only being one with the divine urge of both purpose and fulfilling that obligation to the universe.

 

Game Items: Objects in games can typically be broken down into three categories: objects you can’t affect, objects you can pick-up, and fire barrels. An object you can’t affect will often be very deceptive and unlike taking damage, does not reflect its real life counterpart. The average tree in a video game, for example, can survive numerous grenades and heavy machine gun fire. These objects must, like death, be accepted as a part of the game. Objects you can pick up typically glow. Depending on the ease that the developers are attempting, these objects will either glow brighter than a Christmas tree or only blink when you’re looking at them. Fire Barrels are part of an international conspiracy by the game developing community to protest oil and fuel industries. In order to maximize profits and encourage people to not drive their cars by staying home and gaming, all things gasoline are highly dangerous and this subconsciously makes the player become filled with dread whenever they near a gas station. 

Sandbox Games: Not to be outdone, the nihilist arcade groups reorganized themselves into a sect of agrarian evangelical anthropromorphists and created the sandbox genre out of which the human spirit can “truly grow and prosper”. In these games the play is often confronted with a huge array of options and is encouraged to pursue them all until they discover the one “true path” to full growth and expression by following the plot missions. Their motto, “The right to die in a game is the right to succeed”, can often be found dispersed throughout their works.
Experience Points: A Japanese sect of neo-confucianists who believe in life as a series of diegetic levels created a type of role playing game in which your engagement with dull day to day tasks provides the ability for you to go on greater and more exciting missions involving the plot.

 

As you can see, there really is nothing at all to playing the more advanced games in the medium. So long as you understand the cultural trends and values going on, you should be able to start pwew pwewing in no time! If anything, part of what makes games so fun is that the player input allows you to assign your own values to the game. One person’s love interest is another person’s baggage, one person’s epic plot is another person’s skipped cutscene. As The New Yorkers write-up on Cliff Bleszinski illustrated to many readers, the meaning in games is often personally derived instead of broadcasted by an arbitrary author. While Cliff made a mission that was about going home to a place that doesn’t really exist anymore, many just players chainsawed apart another alien in co-op mode. How you play games is a part of how that meaning is derived, how you learn that play is an intrinsic part of the experience. That’s both what makes video games so profound and yet still capable of entertaining the most basic impulses and desires. It’s a good thing too, or else some batshit critic could just post a bunch of nonsense and act like he was making a point.

by Lara Killian

16 Feb 2009

Recently I finished reading Kenneth Oppel’s Airborn, the winner of Canada’s well-respected Governor General’s Award  for Children’s Literature in 2004—or “The GGs” for short. Recommended to anyone who loves a good shipwreck story and has a sense of adventure, this tale takes place in a slightly shifted reality.

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Matt Cruse was born in the air, and he only feels at home and free while sailing as cabin boy on the Aurora, a luxury airship that caters to wealthy travelers and makes long journeys from continent to continent. When Matt rescues a dying hot air balloonist, he unknowingly embarks on a new sort of journey, where his life and the Aurora herself are caught up in a fantastic adventure. Kate de Vries is a privileged teenager and the granddaughter of the hot air balloonist, accustomed to getting whatever she wants and determined to understand what her beloved grandfather went through before he died. Before she can find what she’s looking for, the Aurora is plundered by deadly air pirates, and damaged seemingly beyond repair. Matt gets caught up in Kate’s explorations of the tropical island the ship lands upon, even though his first instinct is to help with the ship’s rescue. Filled with unlikely adventure and yet realistic emotional drama, this is a wonderful story of soaring beauty and dedication to one’s beliefs, no matter the consequences.

Matt is likable and dedicated, and reading about his love for flying and crippling fear of being grounded is enthralling. Matt has his hopes for promotion and desire to work on the Aurora’s sails, maybe even captaining his own ship one day. This book has some other wonderful characters, like the charismatic yet deadly pirate leader Szpirglas and the snippy but humorous head chef Mr Vlad.

Interestingly, the male characters are more believable and fleshed out than Oppel’s female characters, possibly a reflection of the author’s gender. Kate and her chaperone, Miss Simpkins, are less fully developed than Matt, Captain Walken, and the pirate Szpirglas. The male characters seem to get more complexity, while the females stick to stereotypes in a great fashion: Kate is stubborn and willful, Miss Simpkins is hysterical and controlling. It’s worth looking beyond these simplifications for the enjoyment of a well-told story.

Matt, however, vacillates between his devotion to the Aurora, frustration at being passed over for promotion in favor of a wealthy outsider’s son, and the desire to be close to his father, who worked on the Aurora herself until his death. Matt works hard, and is rewarded for his loyalty, but things don’t always go his way, and when he comes up against difficulties, the reader discovers how resourceful and clever Matt really is. I look forward to reading the rest of the Airborn series!

I find that the dead of winter is a great time for a tropical adventure. Have you read any good escapist fiction lately?

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