Latest Blog Posts

by Sarah Zupko

6 Mar 2009

Eight years ago this week UK acoustic band Turin Brakes released their debut The Optimist LP. We loved the record back then and it still sounds fresh and timely. Devon Powers raved: “Turin Brakes have created a testament to singing and songwriting, and it’s impossible not to believe. The Optimist LP is a treasure chest of sparkly baubles and rare gems, and from top to bottom it is precious and priceless.” The record spawned a rash of videos highlighted below, plus, a live treat at the end of the batch.

Turin Brakes - Underdog (Save Me)

Turin Brakes - Emergency 72

Turin Brakes - Mind Over Money

Turin Brakes - The Door

Turin Brakes - Over & Over and Feeling Oblivion

by Sean Murphy

6 Mar 2009

Ming Xia.

Never heard of her?

You’ve probably had the pleasure of hearing her, via “Things I’ve Seen”, the hit from her band Spooks’ deubt album. But that was almost a decade ago. The follow-up Faster Than You Know didn’t exactly set the world on fire.

Unless she is operating under a different name or I am woefully out of touch (very possible), Ming Xia has been silent. This is unacceptable. The beef some had with her band was that her angelic voice was being wasted alongside second-rate rappers and uninspired music. Not sure I concur, particularly on their first album. But there is no question that within a band or solo, we need more from her.

Danger Mouse: please help her. Help us.

by Mike Deane

6 Mar 2009

Rick Ross has just stepped up the bougie-rap image to a new level.  In the video, Ross is a thoroughbred race-horse owner, dressed in an all-white suit and is sporting big, clear-framed ‘80s-style prescription glasses.  Usually with Ross, there’s some sort of thuggishness thrown in with the upper-class dress code, but in this video he does away with everything street, coming off like some sort of rich New England, nu-bourgeoisie, country club member.  I don’t think horse-racing has ever been approached with such sincerity in any music video.  The song is a nice and smooth, rap slow-jam with Ross’s signature smug, power-brags in full effect.  When he says “My money long / My money strong / If you ain’t getting money that mean you doin’ something wrong,” you’ll question your life choices, maybe.

by Bill Gibron

6 Mar 2009

It’s finally here - after months of hype and numerous pre-release publicity pushes, Watchmen arrives in theater today. For those looking to go beyond the basic review, SE&L has put together this compendium - a collection of articles, features, and commentaries we have created in anticipation of this watershed work. Below, you will find links to everything from our final assessment on the film itself to a look back at Alan Moore and Dave Gibbons’ original graphic novel. In between are takes on director Zack Snyder, a discussion of the changes made between book and movie, and an argument in favor of Jackie Earle Haley as a Best Supporting Actor Oscar nominee in 2010. So in between trips to the Cineplex, stop by and catch up on all the Watchmen minutia you never thought you needed to know. Come Monday, we will discuss the box office import of the weekend’s returns, and look at the soundtrack elements (songs and score) for the movie itself.

Our REVIEW of the FILM


Our LOOK at Director Zack Snyder

Our DISCUSSION of the Changes Made in the Watchmen Finale

Our DISSECTION over the Casting of the Movie

Our ARGUMENT for Jackie Earle Haley as Watchmen’s MVP

Our OVERVIEW on the Potential Audience for the Film

Our ANALYSIS of the film’s box office performance and its impact

Our REVIEW of the Soundtracks

Our REVIEW of the DVD release of ‘Tales from the Black Freighter’ and ‘Under the Hood’

by Christian John Wikane

6 Mar 2009

San Francisco, circa 1969: The Pointer Sisters have just returned to San Francisco after an ill-fated trip to Houston. Producer David Rubinson, who paid their fare back to the west coast, signs them to his management company with Bill Graham. While vetting record deals, he finds session work for this intriguing trio of sisters with some of the Bay Area’s most notable musicians, including Tower of Power, Grace Slick Betty Davis, and Boz Scaggs.

Among the acts The Pointer Sisters worked with onstage and in recording studios during their pre-fame ascent was famed guitarist Taj Mahal. The Pointer Sisters lent their harmonies to a handful of his albums from the early-‘70s like Recycling the Blues & Other Related Stuff (1971) and Ooh So Good ‘N’ Blues (1973). To honor the 35th anniversary of The Pointer Sisters’ solo debut, Taj Mahal wanted to relay just what it is about Ruth, Anita, Bonnie, and June Pointer that makes them one of the most special group of individuals he’s ever worked with in his 40-year career:

“The Pointer Sisters! Yeeuuhh!! I hope through the printed word I can communicate the sheer joy and personal excitement I have had in being part of the audience, performing, recording, touring with and championing their star studded career, these women who rose from well nurtured southern roots to take the world by storm with their unique harmonies, beauty and earthy sounds!

All the songs I recorded with them were before their meteoric climb up the charts, onto the world stage and into the hearts of millions! Hit after great hit… and peeps, those songs still stand today! But what you’ll notice is that with our early collaborative recordings “the ladies” were already well formed, in tune and had a sound that we captured then!!

If I had it to do all over again, I would have performed and recorded more with “the ladies!” My work with them will always remain one of the special high points in my life and my career!

Keep up your excellent work, know I’ll always love y’all and can’t wait to hear whatcha’ doin’ now!! XXXX Taj”

//Mixed media

Indie Horror Month 2015: 'Dark Echo'

// Moving Pixels

"Dark Echo drops you into a pitch back maze and then renders your core tools of navigation into something quite life threatening.

READ the article