{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by shathley Q

10 Aug 2009

All these years later, it is still a thrill ride. Waid crafted a truly endearing vehicle for Flash, six or so months or major storyarcs, and six or so months of fillers.

Issue 91, ‘Out of Time’ is one such filler issue. Effectively both coda to the ‘Trial of Wally West’ storyarc told over the four issues prior, and prologue to runaway hit, ‘Terminal Velocity’. ‘Out of Time’ fits in with another long-running creative project of Waid’s; the superhero neurosis of Wally West. In the watershed ‘Return of Barry Allen’, Waid established the Wally West character as an essay in superhero psychology. Wally’s powers were waning, we discover, because of an insecurity limiting his capacity to adopt the mantle of his mentor Barry Allen.

But after defeating the villainous Reverse-Flash, and excising the ghost of Barry Allen, could Waid still tap the psychological as source material for Wally’s story?

In ‘Out of Time’, Wally (overcome by an incapacity to save all lives) uses Johnny Quick’s speed formula to boost his already impressive superspeed. But the plan falls apart. The boost of superspeed means Wally’s frozen in time. Once time starts up, the lives of three helicopter pilots might be lost. Zen guru and speedster, Max Mercury, boosts his own speed to deliver a message to Wally: ‘Don’t be afraid, live in the moment’.

The real treat of course, is Mike Weiringo’s hyperreal cartoonish style. As Max Mercury slows down, colorist Gina Going uses the masking effect to illustrate his return to ordinary human speeds. But beyond the colors, it is the tilts and outcroppings that make this sequence what it is. With Wally catching the falling Max, then donning his mask Ringo illustrates how Max’s point has hit home. Ringo’s playful artwork reminds us of the ordinary heroism of facing our fears, and thriving.

by PopMatters Staff

10 Aug 2009

Mika
We Are Golden
(Universal)
Releasing: 22 September

British pop star Mika follows up his 5.6 million selling hit debut Life in Cartoon Motion with We Are Golden this fall. Mika trekked to L.A. to record the tunes for the new album and Greg Wells, who has worked with Pink and Rufus Wainwright, manned the production booth. Judging from the debut video “We Are Golden”, we’re in for more catchy pop with more than a trace of Freddie Mercury-esque vocals.

SONG LIST

Standard Edition
01 We Are Golden
02 Blame It on the Girls
03 Rain
04 Dr John
05 I See You
06 Blue Eyes
07 Good Gone Girl
08 Touches You
09 By the Time
10 One Foot Boy
11 Toy Boy
12 Pick Up Off the Floor
13 Lover Boy (bonus track)
14 Lady Jane (iTunes bonus track)

Deluxe Edition: Disc 2 Mika Live at Sadler’s Wells
01 Grace Kelly
02 Lady Jane
03 Stuck in the Middle
04 Lonely Alcoholic
05 Blue Eyes
06 Toy Boy
07 Billy Brown
08 Good Gone Girl
09 Over My Shoulder
10 Big Girl (You’re Beautiful)
11 Love Today
12 Blame It on the Girls
13 Happy Ending
14 Lollipop
15 My Interpretation
16 Rain
17 Relax, Take It Easy

by PopMatters Staff

10 Aug 2009

Scotland’s Glasvegas dropped by Ferguson’s show last Thursday night before making their way to Chicago for Lollapalooza.

by PopMatters Staff

10 Aug 2009

Neo-retro-soul diva Sharon Jones appeared with her Dap-Kings on Craig Ferguson’s show last Friday night to play the title track from her 2007 album. As always, she was smokin’.

by Bill Gibron

10 Aug 2009

One could easily argue that cooler, more intelligent heads finally prevailed. After little over a year of lagging ratings and regular reputation hits, Disney has finally pulled the plug on its failing “youth” update of the classic Siskel and Ebert review series At the Movies. Replaced were the quote-whoring team of Ben Lyons and Ben Mankiewicz, with an announced pairing of Chicago Tribune’s Michael Phillips and the New York Times’ A. O. Scott taking their place. The change represents the House of Mouse’s backhanded admission that their attempt at “dumbing down” the show for a perceived anti-critic demographic was about as successful as Will Ferrell taking on a classic kid’s show from the ‘70s. As flops go, it’s not a complete embarrassment, but it does speak to a bigger issue infiltrating the media today.

There is a mandatory mantra, spread among studios, film geeks, geek-oriented websites, and the members of messageboard nation that film critics don’t matter. They are a marginalized bunch, believed to be out of step with what mainstream audiences want, betrothed to their beloved arthouse fare while forsaking equally important genres like horror and/or family films. They are caricatured like Neo-con Republicans - white, aged, and about as hip as a mix tape from Dick Cheney - and blamed for every star-studded failure, regularly ridiculed for every cinematic rarity when personal opinion consensus just doesn’t match the box office returns (right, Transformers: Revenge of the Fallen?).

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Vast Loneliness of 'No Man's Sky'

// Moving Pixels

"You cannot escape yourself in No Man's Sky. There is little to do but analyze the self.

READ the article