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by Katharine Wray

30 Sep 2009

Brand New
Daisy
(Interscope)
Release: 22 September

New Jersey rock band Brand New has gone through a lot of incarnations since their emo debut, Your Favorite Weapon. With each album Brand New’s sound, while always infectious, becomes more sarcastic and less brooding. Daisy is very dark, very good, and still as clever as the first album.

SONG LIST
01 Vices
02 Bed
03 At the Bottom
04 Gasoline
05 You Stole
06 Be Gone
07 Sink
08 Bought a Bride
09 Daisy
10 In a Jar
11 Noro

by Katharine Wray

30 Sep 2009

Prolific songster Dent May & His Magnificent Ukulele will bring his tiny instrument and vocal and lyrical stylings to the Getty Center on October 10th.

Dent May & His Magnificent Ukulele
Meet Me in the Garden [MP3]
     

Tour dates after the jump.

by Tyler Gould

30 Sep 2009

The video for The Dodos’ “Fables”, from the recently released Time to Die allows you to listen to the song and see what the band looks like at the same time. It is for the most part without flourish until the bridge, the most interesting bit of the song itself, when confetti falls from the ceiling while the band plays in slow motion. The music is fine, but the confetti is unevenly spaced and could honestly be a little more colorful—yet another wasted opportunity to get people excited about confetti like they must have been the first time somebody cut paper into tiny pieces and dropped it from a great height. Click through to see their remaining fall tour dates.

by AJ Ramirez

30 Sep 2009

The 2010 nominees for the Rock and Roll Hall of Fame have been announced. The ballot includes KISS, the Stooges, Genesis, LL Cool J, ABBA, Jimmy Cliff, the Chantels, Darlene Love, Donna Summer, Laura Nyro, the Hollies, and the Red Hot Chili Peppers. Of these 12, five will be chosen for induction into the Hall early next year. That’s a pretty diverse selection.

The Rock and Roll Hall of Fame has long suffered from two main flaws when it comes to choosing artists for induction. First, the Hall subscribes to the Rolling Stone definition of rock music: basically, all popular music since the late 1950s that isn’t country. In particular, what is favored is the music the baby bomber generation grew up on and loved. This makes perfect sense as the Hall was co-founded by Rolling Stone creator Jann Wenner, and features several contributors to the magazine on its nomination committee and in its voting pool. More problematic is that there is no hard metric to help decide an artist’s merit for induction. Unlike with sports hall of fames, artists are not measured by figures or performance statistics in order to ascertain their worthiness to join the Rock Hall. The only hard criterion is that an artist is only eligible for induction 25 years after they have released their first recording. Aside from this one rule, the 30-member nomination committee weighs concepts like influence and longevity in choosing artists for the ballot in lieu of more concrete measurements like record sales or number of awards won. Additionally, members of the nomination committee can easily exert their own personal prejudices, leading to the active lobbying of induction for some artists and the active dismissal of others held in low critical regard, regardless of that artist’s impact or influence. These factors combined explain why Percy Sledge, Miles Davis, and Madonna are in the Hall, and why Deep Purple, Genesis, and the Cure aren’t.

The Rock Hall of Fame has made some strides in addressing common criticisms of its induction process. For starters, the number of artists on the nomination ballot has been increased from nine to 12 artists this year. Additionally, the Hall’s Chief Curator Jim Henke has explained that the nominating committee has created three subcommittees to suggest nominations in particular genres (“one on progressive rock and heavy metal, one on hip-hop and one on early rock and rollers and rhythm & blues”), which inspires confidence that the Hall is aiming to reach outside the baby boomer music canon. Those considerations have resulted in a pretty intriguing ballot; while there are still head-scratchers (really, Laura Nyro?), there are a fair number of artists who definitely have earned their places in the history of modern music. Let’s take a look at a few of them.

by Allison Taich

30 Sep 2009

Tom Morello (Rage Against the Machine/Audioslave) and Boots Riley (The Coup) joined forces earlier this year to combine their vices of socially- and politically-driven music. The result of their merger was the Street Sweeper Social Club (SSSC). After massive amounts of touring, appearances, and YouTubing, SSSC has declared the song “Promenade” as their new single. Complete with an extended guitar solo, “Promenade” offers everything from funk, rap, ‘80s metal, to square dancing. The song starts out with a funky bass line, leading up to Riley’s lyrics in a hoe-down fashion, giving one the urge to jump around, do-si-do, head bang, and dance all at once.

About three quarters of the way through the song, Morello unleashes an uncharacteristic guitar solo. Straying from his classic turn-table scratching aesthetic, Morello’s solo is clean, sounding more like power rock from the 1980s. Eventually he throws in some trademark scratching, only to return to the power chords. Morello stated in a made-for-YouTube video that “Promenade” was chosen as SSSC’s newest single, “because people went absolutely buck nuts when we played this song in concert.” The song can bestreamed through SSSC’s website.

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