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by PopMatters Staff

23 Jul 2009

Animal Collective released Merriweather Post Pavilion to near universal acclaim earlier this year and are on track to do very well indeed in year-end top albums lists of many publications, including this one. They chat with Noisevox about the success of the album and much more.

More videos from the Animal Collective series…

by PopMatters Staff

23 Jul 2009

The Thermals kicked off the brand new Noisevox site this June with four live tunes and a set of interviews.

by Bill Gibron

23 Jul 2009

Most have heralded it as a match made in fantasy filmmaking heaven—Tim Burton and Lewis Carroll. The mad genius behind Edward Scissorhands and A Nightmare Before Christmas taking on the quintessential freak show fairy tale—Alice in Wonderland…except, that’s not actually what is happening. With the ‘Net abuzz with news of a recently released teaser trailer for the upcoming Disney effort (March 2010 is the proposed time frame for its debut), it’s interesting to note what this new version of Alice is… and is not.

First off, this is not a long awaited faithful interpretation of Carroll’s work by Burton. Instead, from reading early script reviews and the available online synopsis, the eccentric A-list director is taking the Alice characters and reworking them, Hook style, into a more modern, epic-oriented work. In this total reimagining of the tale, Alice is a teen, runs away from a party turned proposal, and ends up back in Wonderland. There she helps the White Queen defeat the evil that is her Red sister with the help of some familiar players from both Volumes of Carroll’s creative lore.

Huh? Doesn’t exactly sound like the “Walrus and the Carpenter”, does it? While the early word had casting run from inspired (Crispin Glover as the Knave of Hearts) to tired (Johnny Depp—yes AGAIN—as the Mad Hatter), the one thing you could count on was Burton’s vision. Part veiled Victorian Gothic, a smidgen of Edward Gorey, and a lot of his own adolescent insecurities, his style usually offers up memorable images—just look at such imaginative works as The Corpse Bride, Beetlejuice, and Sleepy Hollow. But this critic for one was rather underwhelmed by the initial pre-production stills, and now the trailer comes along to inspire even more concern. While it’s still too early to tell, this may be the first time that Burton has been caught copying himself—and doing it rather ineffectually.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Jul 2009

Noisevox is a new live music site, focused mainly on indie rock and they’ve come out of the gate with an impressive array of weekly live performances within that genre with Animal Collective and Moby headlining a few of the June shows. In this episode, Dan Deacon runs through a bunch of tunes and chats with Noisevox. You can get to the interviews here, but the songs are below.

by G E Light

23 Jul 2009

For my money the most interesting new band going is the West Vancouver duo, Japandroids, who recently released their debut, Post-Nothing. I know it’s trendy to talk about the new wave of art rock and/or grungy lo-fi blues two pieces from New York and the Upper Midwest. But as we shall see Japandroids spring from their own noble and older left coast tradition. First to the band and the disc. Their instrumentation is spare guitar and drums. Formed at the University of Victoria in 2006 the band features Ben [E.] King on the former and David {No Not Darth Vader] Prowse on the latter. Originally thought about being a trio but settled on duo format and shared vocal duties. To early self-released EPs appeared -- All Lies (2007) and Lullaby Death Jams (2008) -- before they signed to the Canadian indie Unfamiliar Records and released Post-Nothing.

They probably will make you forget fellow Canucks Death from Above 1979 with their… fill in the blank. The single getting all the buzz is "Young Hearts Spark Fire" and it is a doozy; here's the video:

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Further Explorations of the Zero

// Moving Pixels

"We continue our discussion of the early episodes of Kentucky Route Zero by focusing on its third act.

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