{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by Eleanore Catolico

13 Oct 2009

Astro Boy is the upcoming animated 3D movie based on the popular Japanese manga series by Osamu Tezuka. Freddie Highmore of Finding Neverland and Charlie and the Chocolate Factory gives voice to Astro Boy, a young robot who must save Metro City from the destructive hands of robot gladiators, led by Hamm Egg (Nathan Lane). Other vocal talents include Nicolas Cage, Kristen Bell, and Donald Sutherland. The movie is set to hit theaters October 23rd.

by Faye Rasmussen

13 Oct 2009

The Temper Trap’s debut release, Conditions, comes out today, October 13th. If the Melbourne band sounds familiar, it may be due to their contribution on the 500 Days Of Summer soundtrack with their single, “Sweet Disposition”. In addition to the release of their first album today, you can also spot the band tonight on Jimmy Kimmel. They are starting a U.S. tour this week, singing their new ten track album along the way. Here’s a single off the new album, “Down River”.

The Temper Trap
Down River [MP3]     

by Rachel Balik

13 Oct 2009

Last week, Randall Stross wrote an article in the New York Times called “Will Books Be Napsterized?”. Stross reports as more readers opt for e-books over print or audio versions, the usual slew of piracy web sites that traffics in free music downloads is making it possible to download e-books for free. In other words: more grim news for the already beaten-down publishing industry. Book sales have been plummeting for the past two years anyway; the article reports a 13% decrease in 2008 and a 15.5% decrease in July 2009. Of course sales were down in every industry in 2009, but everyone knows that the book industry has troubles of its own.

The business model has never been particularly cost effective, with publishers footing the bill for printing, shipping copies off to booksellers and hoping for the best. E-books are certainly a more viable model in terms of overhead costs, but if the piracy of e-books takes off, the publishing industry is in big trouble. And of course, that’s not really an “if”. The piracy of e-books will take off, and it’s inevitable that books are headed down the path of CDS: towards the graveyard.

by Eleanore Catolico

13 Oct 2009

Phoenix, continuing to make the late night rounds, performed “Girlfriend” off their current record, Wolfgang Amadeus Phoenix, on The Late Late Show with Craig Ferguson last Friday.

by L.B. Jeffries

13 Oct 2009

It is unfair for me to write about the issue of games and violence without acknowledging that I am not inclined to believe there is a causal relationship. I have played games my entire life even Wolfenstein when I was barely old enough to understand basic DOS. I learned to read and write by playing adventure games. I also do not have children, so these thoughts are all coming from a person with no experience raising a child. So go to your kitchen and fetch a salt shaker. Now lick your wrist. Pour salt on that spot then lick that.

This post was originally meant to be a comparison between two books, one claiming games make you violent and the other claiming they do not. Unfortunately, neither selected book really made a good case for either argument. The leading book that claims there is a causal relationship is Violent Video Game Effects on Children and Adolescents. Written by Craig Anderson, Douglas Gentile, and Katherine Buckley, it summarizes three studies of varying types that test the correlation between aggressive behavior and playing video games. The book pretty much shoots itself in the foot right off the bat by establishing a problematic definition of aggressive behavior. It must be “(a) a behavior that is intended to harm another individual, (b) the behavior is expected by the perpetrator to have some chance of actually harming that individual, and (c) the perpetrator believes that the target individual is motivated to avoid the harm.” (13) The problem is that the book is a study of children and adolescents. How many small children wrestling with one another have a large enough comprehension of consequences and intent to be able to consciously register any of these things?  The book is rife with moments where what’s being claimed contradicts common sense and the definition of aggression. For example, a lengthy exposition of why studies on aggression during the 1990s are flawed due to socioeconomic upbringing is generally considered bad because kids from privileged backgrounds are already less likely to be violent. Your common sense should kick in here: if the connection between games and violence is literally that playing them makes you more aggressive, why does wealth undermine it so drastically? Some difference is to be expected, but it doesn’t help the argument that playing the games by themselves is inherently bad for a child.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Of Pillow Forts and Play: Epic Games' 'Fortnite'

// Moving Pixels

"Everybody loves building a fort.

READ the article