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by Vijith Assar

11 Jun 2009

Currently bouncing around the blogosphere: Subprime, the hypnotic new animated short by Wisconsin graphic designer Mike Winkelmann, which illustrates the progression of the housing crisis like, well, a Pixar flick about imperiled homeowners.

As if the eagle-eye view of a Lego Dubai wasn’t already cool enough, it also features a a killer score by Ratatatty electronica-rock duo NOBOT. The sound design and audio effects were also pored over by Nobot’s Kyle Vande Slunt; the resulting clicks and bloops are a pretty crucial part of the experience, so you might prefer the alternate version of the track that leaves them all intact. Funny noises make everything better, even catastrophic end-of-civilization crises.

by Sarah Zupko

11 Jun 2009

Rancid released a great new album last week, full of precisely the sort of smart, politically aware lyrics these recessionary times call for. The band also rocked the house this week on The Tonight Show.

by Joe Tacopino

11 Jun 2009

Pure Magic. Vanderslice + Magik*Magik Orchestra perform a song off his stellar new album.

by Matt Mazur

11 Jun 2009

Martin Scorsese directs Leo, Ben Kingsley, Patricia Clarkson, Emily Mortimer, Mark Ruffalo, Michelle Williams, Jackie Earle Haley, and Max von Sydow. Really, I can’t think of few things that could be better…

by shathley Q

11 Jun 2009

It began slowly enough, but over the course of four issues Sheriff Moses Stone proves to be the most seductive of untrustworthy narrators. “I’m not a killer, but I have killed”, Moses reminds readers in captioned narration. At the opening of the story, “Holy” Moses Stone is a man in search of redemption. A retired bounty hunter now working to keep the peace in Bollas Raton, Moses hopes to bury the past that brought him to this point. But within pages of establishing Moses’ well-intentioned nature and his only-too-human search for inner peace, writer Brian Azzarello begins chipping away at his fictional creation.

Azzarello forces readers into one fork of morality after the next. Immersing his audience in the mystery of what originally brought Moses to Bollas Raton, Azzarello writes a piece of noir fiction set in the Old West. When Stone uncharacteristically agrees to pursue el Diablo for a bounty, readers’ interest remains piqued. Why would Stone jeopardize the life he built for himself in Bollas Raton? And why would el Diablo leave only Stone alive after a bloody shootout on Main Street? Why mark Stone with the word “Halo”, rather than kill him?

As the questions mount, Stone’s moral descent becomes ever more clear. From pursuit of money, to lying, to outright murder, Azzarello’s talent lies in animating Stone in such a way that readers ultimately excuse the violence in hopes of finding answers. All the while, Stone and his ever-thinning posse hunt down the elusive el Diablo who seems to continually circle back and chase down his pursuers.

In this short sequence of panels, artist Daniel Zezelj plays visually on the idea that el Diablo can never be surrounded. Unarmed and with his back turned to Stone, el Diablo seems finally to be at the mercy of his last remaining pursuer. But rather than having entered a trap he is unable to escape, el Diablo has played out his final ruse. Just as Stone lowers his gun to el Diablo’s neck so too Stone finds a gun pointed at his own. Cal Chaney, the Halo sheriff, has finally put the pieces to together, and Holy Moses must now answer for a trail of bodies.

No devil, only you.

No devil, only you.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Cage the Elephant Ignite Central Park with Kickoff for Summerstage Season

// Notes from the Road

"Cage the Elephant rocked two sold-out nights at Summerstage and return to NYC for a free show May 29th. Info on that and a preview of the full Summerstage schedule is here.

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