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by Rachel Balik

19 Aug 2009

The Little Dog Laughed appeared two years ago on Broadway to great acclaim, and was heralded as a tight and enthralling comedic endeavor and described as a play about the ills—and wonders—of the entertainment industry. It is undeniably an impeccably written show filled with the kind of lines that simply require straight-faced genuine delivery to illicit laughter. But often, it is the kind of laughter that comes when we recognize an important and uncomfortable truth, not necessarily something outright funny. With each actor fully utilizing the richness of these moments, the production of the Little Dog Laughed at the Wellfleet Harbor Actors Theater in Cape Cod, directed by Daisy Walker, seemed to reveal as much about basic human nature as it did about the entertainment business.

The play, by Douglas Carter Beane, features cutthroat agent Diane, played with passion, enthusiasm and myopic devotion by Elizabeth Atkeson, who fears her client, rising star Mitchell, will destroy his career by failing to hide his “recurring case of homosexuality.” While in New York for an award’s ceremony, Mitchell becomes romantically involved with a young male prostitute, Alex, who has a sort-of girlfriend, Ellen (Stacy Fischer) but is, in reality, grappling with his own sexuality and falling very hard for Mitchell.

Much has changed politically and socially since the play first appeared on Broadway in 2006, and for that reason, Diane’s heartless insistence that homosexuality is a career-breaker is even more startling. Her character is also a lesbian, and her point of view is made all the more chilling because of Atkeson’s impeccable commitment to the whole truth of her role. Her seamless transitions between a woman who grasps the nuances of human nature better than Jung and power-hungry business without the faintest concern for another human provide the greatest elements of humor in the role. She never once tries to play funny, and is thus captivating.

As Mitchell, Robert Kropf, is so unassuming and charmingly tentative that we almost forget that he, and his character, are actors. His deliberations and waffling make it hard to judge him and make the moments when he jumps into “actor-mode” all the more chilling. The irony is that is Mitchell’s true self is as single-mindedly self-absorbed as Diane’s; his human moments are folly. He’s mirrored by David Nelson as Alex, who enters the stage smooth and aloof, and literally unfolds on a clear, visible and enveloping trajectory throughout the play.

Nelson’s ability to represent these changes both physically and vocally provides the play’s clearest arc, pushing him into the role of main protagonist by the end. He serves as perfect complement as Atkeson, who pulls the audience into her tornado of determination but refuses to budge for anyone or anything. Ultimately, her commitment, as misguided as it is, makes her the only character with integrity.

Under Walker’s direction, all actors make great use of the sleek, modern set, designed by Kevin Judge, which represents a hotel room, restaurants, offices, subways and a grungy apartment in Williamsburg. The hotel room is the featured section, and is done with perfect realism, down the to mini bar. Its vitality makes is easier to believe that two simple stairs downstage represent a subway car. Atkeson’s mobile phone headset, and her fierce concentration make us willing to believe she is New York, LA, on a side walk or a boardroom without much questioning. Overall, Walker has pulled together a remarkably tight piece of regional theater.

And perhaps the intimacy of the setting allowed for even more exploration of the plays nuances. It was consistently funny, but held sadness and sacrifice waiting in the wings at all times. The show’s ability to carry such complexity represents great achievement, commitment and talent from all involved.

by PopMatters Staff

19 Aug 2009

Various Artists
Beat Dimensions 2
(Rush Hour)
Releasing: 6 October (US)

SONG LIST
01 Dorian Concept - Be Tween
02 Nosaj Thing - FWD
03 Zo aka La Chauve-Souris - The Peacock Revolution
04 Low Limit -Turf Day
05 Danny Breaks & DJ Adlib - The Sound
06 P.U.D.G.E. - Reign Dancing With…
07 Dizz1 - Konotakosuke Yaro
08 Samiyam - Swamp Tarts
09 Mike Slott - Cadeting
10 Mono/Poly - Distant Form
11 Ras G - Crazy Alien
12 Dimlite - Ravemond’s Young Problems
13 Devonwho - Welts
14 Erik L - Soularp Suite Pt. 2
15 Kenlo Craqnuques - ZoÏd
16 Tiago - Babel Fish
17 Dalt Wisney - R2FUX
18 Fulgaence - Haggis
19 Exile - Super Robot
20 Busy - Ecliptic Armilla

Nosaj Thing
“FWD” [MP3]
     

by PopMatters Staff

18 Aug 2009

Lightning Bolt
Earthly Delights
(Load)
Releasing: 13 October (US)

SONG LIST
01 Sound Guardians
02 Nation of Boar
03 Colossus
04 The Sublime Freak
05 Flooded Chamber
06 Funny Farm
07 Rain on Lake I’m Swimming In
08 S.O.S.
09 Transmissionary

Lightning Bolt
“Colossus” [MP3]
     

by Faye Rasmussen

18 Aug 2009

Third Eye Blind
Ursa Major
(Megaforce)
Releasing: 18 August (US)

Stephan Jenkins clearly has some things he’s needed to get off his chest over the last six years and to the fortune of the fans, the silence has been broken today and expressed in the form of Third Eye Blind’s fourth album Ursa Major. But, Jenkins and company have come back from hiatus with some aces in hand: incorporating some new instruments and adding depth both musically and lyrically. 

They’re kept with their edgy lyrics, with songs like their first single, “Don’t Believe a Word” Jenkins pens, “We like thugs when they attack / And we like crime when it’s black on black.” Or the softer, acoustic “One in Ten”, about a woman who doesn’t return the singer’s feelings of love, primarily because she’s in love with a woman: “Love doesn’t come in perfect packages / That means I qualify.” With lyrics like this, in addition to new music build-ups and chorus crescendos that blast through your speakers, it’s hard to not not drum on the steering wheel. Or take a listen to “The Dao of St. Paul” where the band opted for a gospel choir to round the end of song, and album, out.

But for the not-so-die-hard, you have songs like “Summertown” or “Waterlanding” that deeply resembling the memorable hooks and catchy lyrics that the popular consensus drank up and imbibed in 1997.  The band, has not forgotten what it takes to make a worthwhile CD, and if anything, they’ve only improved their craft over the last six years.

by PopMatters Staff

18 Aug 2009

The Cinematics
Love and Terror
(Orchard Music)
Releasing: 6 October (US)

SONG LIST
01 All These Things
02 She Talks to the Trees
03 New Mexico
04 Love and Terror
05 Lips Taste Like Tears
06 Wish (When the Banks Collapse)
07 Hospital Bills
08 Moving to Berlin
09 You Can Dance
10 Hard for Young Lovers

The Cinematics
“Love and Terror” [MP3]
     

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