Call for Essays About Any Aspect of Popular Culture, Present or Past

 

Latest Posts

Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Sunday, Dec 9, 2007

Nothing says holiday gift like a personality test in a book, or box in this case, that can reduce your every nuance to an easily classifiable genre type. No, that’s not a bit of music criticism or even a swipe at Hue Are U?, just a recognition that these types of products are ultimately designed to be fun gifts for co-workers and casual friends. The interesting twist on this personality test is that it plays off color cards, appealing to our visual side, unlike the vast majority of text based personality quizzes. Pick your color faves and dislikes and find out not just who you are, according to the helpful box, but also what motivates you and how others see you. Man, couldn’t we all have used this in high school? I can see many a wasted study hall or water cooler break absorbed in this set. Are you a Thinker, Humanitarian, Pioneer, Builder or something else altogether? Hue Are U? will “tell” you.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Sunday, Dec 9, 2007
by Jon Kirby

Superhero comics have struggled to confront the war on terror in a variety of ways, and everybody from Batman to Deadpool has grappled with the issues faced by a post-9/11 world. But few recent series have done so as elegantly as London Falling, which doesn’t force its social commentary and doesn’t disfigure its characters in order to fit them into a political framework (although most of the characters are so obscure that few readers would probably notice if they had). The miniseries is also one of the best revitalizations of a character in years, almost reaching the level of quality seen in Doctor Strange: The Oath—it’s the kind of read that leaves you wishing for a regular Union Jack series. What do you say, Marvel? Like John Lennon said: “A working class hero is something to be.”


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Sunday, Dec 9, 2007

Who says they don’t make good dada anymore? This big screen version of the Cartoon Network/Adult Swim anomaly offers three amiable fast food products (a shake, some fries, and a blob of mystery meat) taking on unhinged elements from around the universe. Part origins exploration, part satiric stream of incontinence, it may not make a lick of sense. But when you’re laughing this hard, does logic really matter? Even better, the DVD version reimagines the medium in a way that both embraces and mocks the special feature heavy format. It stands as a symbol of the film, and the series in general.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Sunday, Dec 9, 2007

Darlene Love has one of the most iconic voices of the holiday season. Come December, her Phil Spector-produced “Christmas (Baby Please Come Home)” from the classic 1963 album A Christmas Gift for You is a staple on the airwaves. Five decades since that landmark recording, Darlene Love has finally released her own album in tribute to the holidays. It’s Christmas, Of Course stands apart from other similarly themed efforts with renditions of strictly contemporary Christmas compositions. You won’t find “Silent Night” or “The Christmas Song”. Instead, Love tackles songs by Robbie Robertson, Tom Petty, and John Lennon with her full-bodied and gospel-inflected phrasing. Producers Shawn Amos and Kevin Killen have assembled a wonderful group of musicians to back Love. Her take on The Pretenders’ “2000 Miles” is given a slightly jazz makeover while NRBQ’s “Christmas Wish” is lovely and loping. Her voice is imbued with more than just the Christmas spirit. There’s an authentic, joyful soul emanating from each one of these songs making It’s Christmas, Of Course an indispensable addition to anyone’s holiday music collection.


Bookmark and Share
Text:AAA
Sunday, Dec 9, 2007

Everything most people know about silent films is wrong.  Now, we lucky denizens of DVD are in a golden age of appreciation for silent movies, as many are beautifully restored or digitally refurbished, tinted, and shown at their correct speeds with sensitive musical accompaniment. We understand that the talkies offered nothing thematically or aesthetically that hadn’t already been known in the silent era. As this double-disc set proves, that includes sound and color. The extras are many and splendid with all sorts of vintage promotional films and paper materials and dozens of photographs of the actor’s houses, pets, and memorials.  This is a treasure for any self-professed film geek.


Now on PopMatters
PM Picks
Announcements

© 1999-2014 PopMatters.com. All rights reserved.
PopMatters.com™ and PopMatters™ are trademarks
of PopMatters Media, Inc.

PopMatters is wholly independently owned and operated.