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by Sarah Zupko

21 May 2009

Remember the insanely catchy “Brimful of Asha” from Cornershop? It was pretty ubiquitous in the late ‘90s and for good reason. The British band’s blend of UK pop with traditional Indian sounds was unique and infectious. The group is returning this year with a new single “The Roll Off Characteristics (Of History in the Making)” to be released on May 26th on their own label.

by PopMatters Staff

21 May 2009

Regina Spektor’s new record Far drops on June 22nd in the US and she recently stopped by Later Live… with Jools Holland to perform “Blue Lips”.

by PopMatters Staff

21 May 2009

Mastodon played “Oblivion” from Crack the Skye on Late Show With David Letterman back on May 15th. Adrien Begrand said of the song: “Mastodon’s new direction is made apparent immediately, starting with the opening track. Compared to Blood Mountain‘s incendiary ‘The Wolf is Loose’, ‘Oblivion’ is far more understated, its murky opening riff slowly gaining momentum, but when the chugging begins in earnest, the emphasis is placed not on the rhythm riff but the richly layered vocal melodies instead, with drummer Brann Dailor (in a shockingly good vocal turn) handling the verses, bassist Troy Sanders joining in the bridge, and guitarist Brent Hinds taking over during the choruses.”

by Robin Cook

21 May 2009

Last autumn, this vidblogger caught Ha Ha Tonka’s stunning show at a Bloodshot Records showcase in Brooklyn. They didn’t disappoint in Austin, either.  Here, guitarist Brett Anderson talks a little about the band’s history. Ha Ha Tonka’s new album, Novel Sounds of the Nouveau South is out now.

by Sarah Zupko

21 May 2009

Five years ago this week the Streets released A Grand Don’t Come for Free, the follow-up to the critically acclaimed Original Pirate Material (2002). Adrien Begrand said back then “like Mike Leigh’s film High Hopes, like Pulp’s Different Class, A Grand Don’t Come For Free is a superb, perceptive portrait of everyday British life, completely devoid of any pretentiousness, and musically, though his beats are toned down, it cements Skinner’s status as a true original in UK music. The album spawned four singles, one of them (“Dry Your Eyes”) a #1 in the UK, and here are the videos.

 

“Fit But You Know It” (1 March 2004) - #4 UK

 

“Dry Your Eyes” (31 May 2004) - #1 UK

 

“Blinded by the Lights” (13 September 2004)

 

“Could Well Be In” (8 November 2004)

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Moving Pixels Podcast: Our Own Points of View on 'Hardcore Henry'

// Moving Pixels

"Hardcore Henry gives us a chance to consider not how well a video game translates to film, but how well a video game point of view translates to film.

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