{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by Tyler Gould

6 Oct 2009

Themselves
CrownsDown
(Anticon)
Releasing: 20 October

Themselves’ theFREEhoudini mixtape is many months behind us now, so I hope it is of minor comfort that their new album is only a couple weeks away. Themselves will be heading out on tour with Eyedea & Abilities in November and December.

SONG LIST
01 Back II Burn
02 Oversleeping
03 The Mark
04 Gangster Of Disbelief
05 Daxstrong
06 You Ain’t It
07 Roman Is As Roman Does
08 Skinning The Drum
09 Deadcatclear II
10 Gold Teeth Will Roll

Themselves
You Ain’t It [MP3]
     

by Tyler Gould

6 Oct 2009

An abridged version of Q-Tip’s ode to hip hop, from last year’s The Renaissance, now has a very cool video, in spite/because of some cartoonishly dorky, family reunion-caliber dance moves from Tip and Norah.

In other news, Kamaal the Abstract finally saw a proper release last month after eight years of wasting away in album purgatory, and you can stream it at Q-Tip’s MySpace and wonder why bad things happen to good albums.

by Rob Horning

6 Oct 2009

Matt Yglesias makes an interesting observation in this post about the normality of biking in Copenhagen.

Thirty-seven percent of Copenhagen commuters use bikes. And given that presumably some people are walking to work, some people are using the bus, some people are using the Metro, and some people are using the S-Tog the resulting situation is one in which cyclists and drivers are really equals.
It’s actually impressive to a degree that’s somewhat unsettling. Regular bicycle commuting in the United States is, among other things, a somewhat meaningful identity category. Initially it’s thrilling to see so many of “your people” everywhere. But looking closer you start to see exactly what was explained to me—the whole reason you have so many people biking around is that cycling is totally mainstream in Copenhagen and doesn’t constitute an identity at all.

I think this constitutes an obstacle for becoming a bike commuter in America, over and above all the infrastructure obstacles and the safety issues. Biking in the U.S.—much like, for example, shopping at farmer’s markets—constitutes an identity many people want no part of even though it offers an ostensibly healthier and/or saner way to live. You have to become one of “those people”; you enter a peculiar spotlight and invite all sorts of assumptions about what you are like. People may treat you as though you have a Greenpeace sticker pasted on your forehead. They may assume you are some sort of free-range zealot brimming with judgmental self-righteousness when all you are is someone who doesn’t drive a car. When I bike, I’m not doing it for attention, but the thought that someone might reasonably draw that conclusion inhibits me. I don’t want to involuntarily be attributed to belonging to anyone’s “people.” Maybe I am too sensitive.

I wonder if at any point it would have been possible to arrest this development of biking into a lifestyle—is anything “nonconformist” doomed to be seen as an attempt to self-promote? Or is that the fault of hipsterization? Of social media?

by Tyler Gould

6 Oct 2009

Molina & Johnson
Molina & Johnson
(Secretly Canadian)
Releasing: 3 November

The first leaked track from Molina & Johnson, the new collaboration between the honchos behind Magnolia Electric Co. and Centro-matic, respectively, is called “Twenty Circles to the Ground”. It sounds a bit more Johnson than Molina, though it has the same soft, persistent toms that have been backing Molina since Songs: Ohia. If you live in the Netherlands, Belgium, England, or Spain, you’ll be able to see the pair perform live for the first time in November and December.

01 Twenty Circles to the Ground
02 All Falls Together
03 All Gone, All Gone
04 Almost Let You In
05 In the Avalon/Little Killer
06 Don’t Take My Night From Me
07 Each Star Marks a Day
08 Lenore’s Lullaby
09 The Lily and the Brakeman
10 Now, Divide
11 What You Reckon, What You Breathe
12 For as Long as It Will Matter
13 34 Blues
14 Wooden Heart

Molina & Johnson
Twenty Cycles to the Ground [MP3]
     

by Gregg Lipkin

6 Oct 2009

It begins with 40 ominous seconds, dangerous seconds; 40 instantly intriguing seconds that capture the imagination of listeners desperate to find out what happens. It begins with 40 seconds that are more warning than music and the sense of danger is real. When Mick Jagger sings of fire sweeping through the streets “like a red coal carpet” and Merry Clayton’s amazing background vocals crack on the words “rape” and “murder” two-thirds of the way through “Gimme Shelter” the danger seems very real. That’s what makes The Rolling Stones’ 1969 masterpiece Let It Bleed so riveting. Every note of it sounds so damn real.

In 1968, with the release of Beggar’s Banquet, The Stones proved that they were not just another rock band; they were masters of the form. Beggar’s Banquet was the first of what could quite possibly be the four best successive rock albums released by any band in the history of rock and roll. The album was a work of startling simplicity, a collection of songs built around American blues and roots music that invented the concept of what it meant to be “The Stones”. With 1969’s amazing follow up, Let It Bleed, The Stones began to add to this concept. If Beggar’s Banquet is a masterpiece of simplicity then Let It Bleed is a masterpiece of authenticity.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

NYFF 2017: 'Mudbound'

// Notes from the Road

"Dee Rees’ churning and melodramatic epic follows two families in 1940s Mississippi, one black and one white, and the wars they fight abroad and at home.

READ the article