{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

18 May 2009

The Crystal Method released a new album, Divided by Night, last week after quite a lag. Here’s the latest video from the release.

by Bill Gibron

18 May 2009

With the collection already containing Cannibal: The Musical, Redneck Zombies, and the amazing Last Horror Film, Troma has announced the next three films in their Tromasterpiece series, and one is a truly forgotten gem. Along with The First Turn-On and Combat Shock, the true art house distributor will be offering Australian auteur Phillipe Mora’s 1976 epic Mad Dog Morgan. Starring a superb Dennis Hopper and dealing with an intriguing part of Aussie folklore, this beautiful and demanding movie is finally getting the digital polish it so richly deserves. The trailer below is just a taste of the treats Troma has in storm. Check out the Collection’s Official Website to find out more.

by Chris Conaton

18 May 2009

Prison Break is over. Three seasons after Michael Scofield (Wentworth Miller) successfully broke his falsely accused brother Lincoln Burrows (Dominic Purcell) out of Fox River Penitentiary, and two seasons after creators originally intended the show to end, it’s done. Well, mostly. Word is that they’ve cooked up one more two-hour special that takes place between the end of the last episode and it’s “4 Years Later” epilogue. But for all intents and purposes, the show wrapped up on Friday night.

Some people have complained that the show lost its momentum in the second season, as the characters got out of prison and separated. Others thought it jumped the shark in the third season, when most of the characters ended up in another prison, this time in Panama. “It got completely ridiculous!” they shout. I submit that the show was always completely ridiculous and that they’re remembering season one through rose-colored glasses. Look, I’ll admit that the twist at the end of season two that put them back in prison was over-the-top silly, but that was the point where I decided to mostly stop worrying about the logic of the show and just enjoy the twisty thrills it provided on a week-to-week basis. Clearly they had to come up with something when Fox renewed the show past the second season, so they completely embraced the pulp fiction/1940s movie serial-style action that was always bubbling under the surface. Prison Break always packed in the thrills and suspense, and they always knew when to ratchet up the action. This kept the show as an exciting guilty pleasure even when it bent over backwards with the twists.

by Lara Killian

18 May 2009

I’m not going to lie; I really enjoy historical fiction, provided it is well-written. Bonus points for an authentically antiquated setting, and careful treatment of racism, sexism and cultural clashes. I completely respect the amount of research that goes into describing the people of another time and place and the lives they may have led.

image

Ariana Franklin’s Mistress of the Art of Death (2007) is a work of historical fiction as well as a first class murder mystery, but not in the popular sense, with a grumpy and/or vengeful (possibly alcoholic) detective directing the action. Franklin’s investigator is a trained doctor imported to England from Sicily in 1171 after four children are gruesomely murdered in Cambridge.

King Henry has asked for a master of the art of death, a doctor who can ‘speak’ to the dead and find out who killed them. Mysterious as this all sounds, what the doctor in question really does is reason out the likely cause of death from the physical indications of violence, and try to puzzle together the pieces to find the killer. The doctor’s task is made much more difficult, however, when she is a woman and must disguise her abilities and quest to avoid being labeled a witch.

Franklin doesn’t shy away from shocking violence and perversion; this story is not meant for those who enjoy historical fiction merely to imagine themselves in another time and place, perhaps the object of devotion of some member of the aristocracy. Mistress of the Art of Death is fast-paced, gritty , and mesmerizing. And luckily for those of us who enjoy quality period fiction, the sequel to Mistress, The Serpent’s Tale (2008) is available, as well as the third in what has rapidly become a series, Grave Goods, released in March 2009.

by Thomas Hauner

18 May 2009

As the Roots slowly adjust to their new day job accompanying Jimmy Fallon and New York-centric lifestyle, their bi-weekly residency at the Highline Ballroom, “The Jam”, has become an unpredictable yet approachable setting to see the group in its element… at least elements of the group. This evening found only Black Thought, ?uestlove—the mainstays of the group—and bass player Owen Biddle leading an open mic night of sorts.

 

The late night set consisted of dozens of young, fledgling musicians sharing the stage with their musical heroes (many gave personal shout outs to the group and/or ?uestlove). It was unclear whether they were all alumni of the same performing arts academy as the Roots themselves (Philadelphia’s High School for Creative and Performing Arts) or just an assortment of their favorite up and coming rappers, vocalists, guitarists, horn players, and percussionists. Regardless, the sell out crowd was supportive and encouraging of the raw talent making its rounds on stage.

However the real story of the night was the stellar rhythm section holding the jam session together—that the Roots are one of music’s best rhythm sections should surprise no one. Naturally de facto music director of the Roots, ?uestlove, was at the helm, micromanaging the shuffling list of musicians from behind his drum kit and also calling out changes and key signatures to the other players. His ambidexterity is awesome, but his real talent is his ability in seamlessly transitioning and transposing multiple musical epochs into one fluid jam. He does it every night and I suspect his work on Late Night is only improving this skill. Along with ?uestlove, the celebrated songwriter and keyboard player James Poyser played back up. Perfectly in sync with ?uestlove the presence of Biddle, on six-string bass, rounded out the extremely adaptable and agile rhythm section.

Given that the Lonely Island (Andy Samberg’s comedy group) had performed on Late Night the previous evening, I was holding out hope that their collaboration with the Roots would spill over into the Highline gig. The band’s ephemeral sets are just another reason to keep coming back for more.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

"Rock Never Dies" Takes Shots at Celebrity Culture In a Surprisingly Effective Episode

// Channel Surfing

"Season 12's best episode yet isn't perfect, but well-done, with an excellent swan song performance by Rick Springfield.

READ the article