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by Sarah Zupko

7 Dec 2008

This massive 17-DVD set is a nature-lovers treasure. These are the documentaries, Planet Earth, The Blue Planet, The Life of Mammals, and The Life of Birds, that have proven the BBC has set the gold standard for nature films and programs.  The ever delightful David Attenborough hosts each of these series and every single episode features mind-blowing photography and startling facts. They are educational for sure, but also more entertainment and addictive than anything else of the sort. The set is an essential addition to the DVD collection of any nature lover or anyone with a deep interest in the “vast” world around us.

AMAZON

by Mike Schiller

7 Dec 2008

Can’t find Wii Fit?  Namco Bandai’s Active Life: Outdoor Challenge may well be a suitable replacement until the impossible-to-find balance board game starts staying on store shelves for more than 30 seconds at a time. No, it won’t measure your weight—rather than a balance board, this Outdoor Challenge comes with a mat, similar to a Dance Dance Revolution pad (or the Power Pad, for those who remember the 8-bit Nintendo’s entry into a similar arena). Using a combination of the pad and the Wiimote, players do everything from simple sprints to kayaking to a good old fashioned game of whack-a-mole. The easiest games are doable for children as young as three or four, while the toughest will have the grownups sweating quicker than they expect. It may not help you lose weight, but it may well be the most kinetic gaming experience you play this year. If nothing else, it’ll keep you going until you really start feeling the pressure of fulfilling those New Year’s Resolutions.

AMAZON

by Karen Zarker

7 Dec 2008

We batched these three together because they’re clearly, quintissentially for the hardcore comics enthusiast. These are history books first—documenting the first appearance of a character, the initial emergence of a storyline, the series’ run, the writers and artists—and art books simultaneously, true to the form.  These books are big, they’re gorgeous, and of course, they’re ‘encyclopedic’ in scope and presentation.  The ecstatic recipient has a large, sturdy bookshelf, no doubt cluttered with comics actions figures, with which to house them.

The DC Comics Encyclopedia, Updated and Expanded Edition
The Vertigo Encyclopedia
Marvel Chronicle

by John Bergstrom

7 Dec 2008

If Motown was the granddaddy of modern Black music, and Stax was its scruffy, shady-yet-magnetic uncle, Philly Soul was the prim-and-proper little sister with a mean streak beneath the makeup. If universality is a sign of great pop, Philadelphia International produced some of the best. Ever. That music is at the center of the long-overdue Love Train: The Sound of Philadelphia. A four-disc, 71-track set, it features no fewer that 26 #1 R&B hits and 27 Top Ten pop hits. Though it spans from Gamble, Huff, and Bell’s early careers to Philadelphia International’s distribution deal with EMI in 1984, its main focus is on the halcyon years 1971-1976. And the collection, overseen by Gamble and Huff themselves, does it right. Everything’s chronological, from start to finish. No incongruous, “themed” discs. No superfluous demos and live tracks. Just the hits, and there were plenty of them. Philadelphia International’s two premier acts, the O’Jays and Harold Melvin & the Blue Notes, are as well-represented as one might expect, with over a quarter of the 71 tracks. With few exceptions, Love Train is a de facto greatest hits for both. If you don’t already have the O’Jays and Blue Notes stuff, you’re already behind the ball. But here’s your chance to make things right, because, aside from the obvious classics, the best thing about Love Train is all the relatively underappreciated, sometimes hidden, gems.

AMAZON

by Bill Gibron

7 Dec 2008

The movie itself (also known as Zibahkhana) is your standard slasher effort. A group of teens head out to see a concert and get systematically butchered by an unseen assassin. That the killer wears a bloodied burka is the first note that something rather extraordinary is happening here. Advertised as “Pakistan’s First Gore Film”, DVD distributor TLA Releasing has given sweet shop/internet café owner turned filmmaker Omar Khan a wealth of added content to explain the problems of making horror flicks under the strict religious laws and government censorship of his homeland. This material is far more fascinating—and frightening—than the film itself.

AMAZON

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Violin Virtuoso L. Subramaniam Mesmerizes in Rare New York Performance (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Co-presented by the World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

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