Latest Blog Posts

by Brice Ezell

2 Jun 2015

The Jacksonville, Florida band Sea Cycles is an interesting case as far as music that’s been called “synth-pop” goes. Whereas the regular practitioners of that style typically place vocals at the center—albeit usually through a gamut of vocal processors and effects—this quartet’s music is primarily instrumental, evoking the stylistics of post-rock. Both “Your Mind is a Sundial” and “Fiber Optic Cables To Antarctica” are close sonic kin to the music of Mogwai, the former sounding like a potential B-side to 2001’s Rock Action. Introspective in disposition and pensive in mood, Ground & Air is an instrumental set that conjures up vivid mental landscapes, as the best instrumental music is in wont to do.

by Sloane Spencer

2 Jun 2015

Great Peacock blew me away during a live taping of their song, “Take Me to the Mountain”, nearly 18 months ago. I’ve been anxiously awaiting their debut full-length album, Making Ghosts, ever since. Recently released on This Is American Music, Great Peacock continues with the roots-based anthems and sing-along choruses, more Southern indie than Americana.

by Sarah Zupko

1 Jun 2015

Stapleton left the group a few years ago to pursue his own solo career and the result is this year’s excellent country/Americana album, Traveller, which debuted at #2 on the country charts. Today, Stapleton has released a new video for “15 Years of Traveller”.

by Sachyn Mital

1 Jun 2015

Iceland’s Ólafur Arnalds continues to gain renown with his diverse solo and collaborative projects. His For Now I am Winter was well-reviewed, he’s done the soundtrack for the detective drama Broadchurch, and his neo-classical project with Alice Sara Ott, The Chopin Project is one of the most intriguing albums I’ve come across in 2015. Kiasmos, a collaboration with Janus Rasmussen, a member of electro-pop Bloodgroup, is a project that began in 2009. But the duo only released their first full-length album last year. Though I didn’t discover it till this year, I was fortunate enough to catch Kiasmos in New York on a rare tour—one that will wrap up soon with a couple California shows before a few European dates (listed below).

by Bill Gibron

1 Jun 2015

She only appears in the last 15 minutes of the film. Mrs. Voorhees’ presence is, at first, rather disorienting, since we’ve seen so few adults during the course of the carnage. As she tries to comfort a distraught and very upset Alice, her almost blasé response to the concept of a killer on the loose makes her instantly suspect.

Still, we’re willing to go with this well-meaning matriarch, at least, up to a point. And then Betsy Palmer, TV star from decades past, opens up her predatory pearly whites and starts telling the story of a boy named Jason, and soon we see the light. As the mother of the drowned lad, Mrs. Voorhees means business, and in her line of work (carving up teenagers), business is booming.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

'Epitaph' Dispels Hollywood Myths About the Gunfight at O.K. Corral

// Re:Print

"Doria Russell finds heroes in the errant in Epitaph, a novel that captures the realities of the famous gunfight at the O.K. Corral, and much more.

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