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by Karen Zarker

5 Dec 2008

Hunter S. Thompson was patient zero for what would become known as ‘Gonzo journalism’. And 50 years later the infection spreads unchecked, and we have adapted.  Writers everywhere emulate his style (and get published); readers still revere his words and methods. This 5-CD set of previously unreleased tapes of Thompson’s adventures captured on his tape recorder will feel as good and immediate as a shot directly to the bloodstream; from his audible renditions of his life with the Hell’s Angels to his time in Vietnam just before the fall of Saigon. This set is the perfect hook-up for those with the most severe Gonzo symptoms.

AMAZON

by Bill Gibron

5 Dec 2008

He’s traveled around the world in 79 days (besting literary adventurer Phileas Fogg by a mere 24 hours), went pole to pole, traversed the entire Pacific Rim “full circle”, hit both the Sahara and the Himalayas, and walked in the footsteps of favorite author Ernest Hemingway. Now, all of these ex-Python’s extraordinary travelogues are available in a whopping 19-DVD boxset. While he tends to follow the Lonely Planet philosophy of sightseeing, Palin provides enough warmth, wit, and wisdom to make these various trips around the globe well worth revisiting again and again. And you can’t beat the BBC cinematography. Simply breathtaking!

AMAZON

by Karen Zarker

5 Dec 2008

This book is a gentle, humorous corrective to the lefty in your life’s assumptions about America’s puritanical past—and that America was ever so ‘straight’ and ‘narrow’ at all.  With one foot in the well-researched past, the other tapping to the rhythms of the present, with one ear tuned toward reverence and one eyebrow raised in irreverence, Sarah Vowel shows Americans that from sea to shining sea, we’re not so different from one another, the ideological divide between us is not so wide as we thought.  Nor are we so different from those seemingly uptight pilgrims of the past—after all. Perfect for the hipster who’s got a pat answer for everything that’s wrong with America.  Put a ribbon on it and present it with an ironic smile.

AMAZON

by PopMatters Staff

5 Dec 2008

The Space in Hamden, Connecticut is a very intimate venue and Kristín Björk Kristjánsdóttir, otherwise known as Kira Kira, told the crowd of about thirty people that her songs took on new meaning when heard in such a cozy place. After checking if anyone was falling asleep, Kristjánsdóttir told one spectator that it would be okay if he did because “we won’t make fun of you if you snore.”

With Alex Somers on the piano and glockenspiel and Kippi Kaninus behind a laptop, Kristjánsdóttir sang and played her guitar as well as some unique inventions of her own making, creating music that other instruments could not. Shining a flashlight into a telephone handset, pressing what looked like a thumb piano, and singing into a tin can equipped with a microphone (all processed through her laptop and other gear), Kira Kira performed songs primarily from the 2008 release Our Map to the Monster Olympics including “Bless”, “Agustskot”, and “One Eyed Waltz”.

In comparison to her fellow Icelanders, Kira Kira’s subtle songs might sound similar to the dreamy amiina—a string quartet often found playing alongside Sigur Rós—while other songs convey a more ominous tone like Jóhann Jóhannsson’s ambient electronic works. Perhaps it is Iceland’s belief in magical beings, like gnomes, elves, and fairies, or its stark terrain that inspires such ethereal music. After playing a new song, Kristjánsdóttir simply told everyone she was finished because she did not want us to wake up from our reverie.

by William Gatevackes

5 Dec 2008

The latest collection of her syndicated Slowpoke strip, has bite, but doesn’t draw blood. That’s only because Sorenson’s arguments are presented with too much intelligence and logic to ever be totally mean. The collection covers cartoons from before the 2004 US Presidential election right up to the primaries for the 2008 election. This is a heady time for political cartoonists. It was the era of George W. Bush’s freefall in popularity, the rise in social networking sites, and an upturn of conspicuous consumer consumption. And Sorenson has something to say about all of it. Yes, the Bush White House, and the neo-con America it represents, provides fodder for many of the cartoons in the book, but Sorenson also aims at targets such as big business, the lack of environmental awareness, the American pursuit of the latest fad, and a wide range of other topics.

AMAZON

//Mixed media
//Blogs

U2's 'The Joshua Tree' Tour Reminds the Audience of their Politics

// Notes from the Road

"The Joshua Tree tour highlights U2's classic album with an epic and unforgettable new experience.

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