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by Boen Wang

25 Apr 2016

There are ghosts in The Winter, but it’s not a ghost story. There’s a love interest, but it’s not a love story. There are unexplained figures, nightmarish visions, and descents into madness, but it’s not a horror story either. In fact, I’m not sure The Winter is much of a story at all.

The film centers on a Greek young man named Niko (Theo Albanis) who attempts to make a living in London as a writer. Niko has accumulated thousands of Euros in debt, and in a clever touch, the film’s opening credits are written on the piles of bills that are strewn across his apartment floor. He decides to return to his hometown of Siatista in rural Greece and hide out in his father’s abandoned house.

by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016

Emmanuel Elone: Some people might know this song as the original sample to Kanye and Jay Z’s 2010 single “Otis”. However, long before those two were the musical superstars that they are today, Otis Redding was dominating the charts in the mid to late ‘60s as the King of R&B with hits like “Try a Little Tenderness”. Everything about this song is fantastic, from it’s pulsing rhythms to Redding’s trademark croons. No matter whether it’s the chorus, verse or bridge, Otis Redding gave it his all, pushing his vocal chords to etch out one more passionate note, maintain one grand vibrato, or belt out some short staccato phrases for effect. There are many reasons as to why Otis Redding picked up the mantle left by Sam Cooke’s untimely passing, and “Try a Little Tenderness” is one of those reasons. [10/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016

Emmanuel Elone: “Light Up the Sky” is a stunning electronic, R&B fusion. With some vibrant synth chords and some distinct percussion (that includes handclaps and possibly finger snaps), “Light Up the Sky” certainly isn’t lacking in the musical department. Bibio’s vocals are great as well, bringing some smooth, passionate singing to the table as well. For some reason, though, “Light Up the Sky” doesn’t pack the punch that I would expect it to, which is surprising since nothing seems to be out of place or outright bad on it. Still, it’s a good song at the very least, and might just simply have to grow on me a bit more before I can fully appreciate it. [6/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016

Pryor Stroud: A bombastic, multi-episode indie rock opera based on the Grateful Dead’s project of the same name, “Terrapin Station” swells with novelistic ambition and fills its over-15-minute length with a variety of interlocking aesthetics, moods, and pop music templates. While it definitely necessitates a prolonged listening experience, it is deserving of the effort it requires, as the sense of narrative it generates—of following a character through multiple settings and situations—is hard to come by in contemporary rock. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Apr 2016

Chris Ingalls: Bob Mould has been on a creative and commercial high point lately; his last few albums have combined crunchy guitars, introspective lyrics and smart melodies more effectively than anything since late Hüsker Dü. This time around, it ain’t broke and he ain’t fixing it. The guitars are still high in the mix and there’s minimal fussing involved. Mould continues to stay relevant well into his AARP years. The fact that he is constantly writing and staying true to his vision while sounding current and relevant is highly commendable… and rare. [8/10]

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'SUPERHOTLine Miami' Is Exactly What It Sounds Like

// Moving Pixels

"SUPERHOTLine Miami provides a perfect case study in how slow-motion affects the pace and tone of a game.

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