{fv_addthis}

Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

23 May 2016

Five years ago, we considered whether cheating matters in both single and multiplayer gaming, as our discussion strays from the most malicious hacking and griefing to even the seemingly benign use of FAQs and video walkthroughs to help us “get through”.

This discussion features Rick Dakan, G. Christopher Williams, Nick Dincola, and Thomas Cross.

by Michael Barrett

23 May 2016

With nods to Daughters of Darkness (1971) and The Hunger (1983), plus a dash of Near Dark (1987), this German production is a sleek, frustrated addition to the lesbian vampire mythos.

A literally over-the-top sequence set aboard an airplane establishes the casual cruelty of a trio of vampiresses. Louise (Nina Hoss), the elegant, blonde queen bee, hails from the 18th Century. The sullen, bookish Charlotte (Jennifer Ulrich) was a ‘20s actress with a role in Dr. Mabuse: The Gambler (1922), which she watches while playing Klaus Nomi’s “Cold Song”. The garish Nora (Anna Fischer), who looks like an extra from Desperately Seeking Susan (1985), would be in her 30s, but she’s a perpetually immature teenager with no impulse control.

by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016

Emmanuel Elone: It would be really easy to hate this song. Super Furry Animals lays on the “bing bong” line heavily across all five minutes of “BingBong’s” runtime, and there are moments in the beginning that feel obnoxious and frustrating as a result. However, once you look past the lack of lyrical ideas and the fairly excessive runtime, “BingBong” is actually pretty great. The beat is steady, and has a fantastic bass line at its core, while the simple lyrics float over the rhythm as another instrument of sorts. When “BingBong” is not being occasionally annoying, it’s fun, catchy and energetic, making it a great hit for the summer. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016

Pryor Stroud: Cryptic, moody, and possessed by a nearly Lynchian sense of unease, “New Age Thriller” is a demented avant-pop vignette that watches two lovers slip behind a wall of shadow to perform strange sexual acts. U.S. Girls—the alias for noise-art iconoclast Meghan Remy—drapes the track’s singsong melody in bizarre synth chimes and dark, monolithic electro tones that seem to rise out of the track’s background. “And I won’t provide it for you / Even though you / Even though you’ll force me to”, Remy sings, and you can sense that her lover is across from her behind a shifting curtain of darkness, his palm outstretched, beckoning her to step away from the light for a while. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016

Pryor Stroud: Charged with gargling synths, metronomic percussion, and a vocal ripped straight out of the ‘80s fem-rock playbook, “Never Going to Die” is the debut single from Mary Jane Dunphe’s new synthpop project CC DUST. While on the surface this is a relatively straightforward electro-punk ballad, the details here deserve additional scrutiny: the foregrounded synthesizer drones are rough-edged, thick, even dirty, and Dunphe’s voice—a hoarse, up-from-the-gut warble—seems determined to fight against them. It’s as if she’s trying to free herself from the track’s sonic muck and, by extension, the oppressive sense of mortality that has begun to feel like a shackle against her skin. [7/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Cage the Elephant Ignite Central Park with Kickoff for Summerstage Season

// Notes from the Road

"Cage the Elephant rocked two sold-out nights at Summerstage and return to NYC for a free show May 29th. Info on that and a preview of the full Summerstage schedule is here.

READ the article