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by Michael Barrett

8 Jun 2017

Georges Franju is an important French filmmaker who made fewer than ten features and is known to Region 1 audiences, and indeed elsewhere, largely for the quietly intense and ghastly horror film Eyes Without a Face (1959). Several years ago, Criterion finally brought out another of his items, Judex (1963), a celebration of the spirit of silent serials, and since then we’ve remained parched for more output.

Perhaps the dam is breaking, for Arrow Films has bestowed upon us the movie Franju made right after Eyes Without a Face. Spotlight on a Murderer  (1961), is scripted by Pierre Boileau and Thomas Narcejac, the famous team of novelists whose work inspired the films Diabolique (1955) and Vertigo  (1958), and we’ll add the vastly underrated Body Parts (1991). In other words, they’re famous for plot twists and a labyrinthine air of mystery in its purest, most uncanny form.

by Sarah Zupko

8 Jun 2017

Cello-playing Americana maestro Ben Sollee has been making waves for years as a musician that seeks to transcend genre boundaries. Ten years ago, he recorded a spare, cello and vocals take on the soul classic “A Change Is Gonna Come” that was a stunningly fresh look at the powerful song from the ‘60s civil rights era recorded first by Sam Cooke and later by Otis Redding and many others. Sollee’s use of quiet spaces within the song helped heighten the dramatic importance of the song’s message.

by Imran Khan

8 Jun 2017

Despite the fact that he’s been working steadily these last 12 years, Black Milk remains one of hip-hop’s most underrated artists. The rapper and producer began his solo career with the decidedly conventional 2005 release Sound of the City, which featured the burgeoning hints of the artist’s tweaked genius throughout. His follow-up, Popular Demand (2007), was another set of squarely hip-hop tunes which were slightly distended by some of the out-there production.

by Jedd Beaudoin

8 Jun 2017

Melodic hard rock act Station returns with the hook-laden “All You Need Is a Heartbeat”, a song that recalls an era of refined harmonies, guitar solos you could sing along with as easily as any chorus and cannon fire drums. Though it’s become fashionable to dismiss or parody the genre, Station carries out its mission with sincerity and passion, the sense that the era that launched Honeymoon Suite and Night Ranger mattered as much as any other. It did, of course, because it kept the tradition of smart songwriting alive while keeping pace with the times.

Patrick Kearney’s impassioned vocal delivery and Chris Lane’s impeccable guitar figures are built on the same foundation partnerships such as Bon Jovi/Sambora and Schon/Perry: A singer who can reach all the appropriate emotional heights and a guitarist who can spur him on to more. If the music is built on the past, it doesn’t necessarily live there. Station’s songs speak to timeless emotions and experiences, ones that transcend hairstyles, music charts, and amp settings.

by Sarah Zupko

8 Jun 2017

LOAH (a.k.a. Sallay Matu Garnett) is a new soul singer from Ireland of Sierra Leonean origin and her music blends West African rhythms into jazzy, groovy arrangements. It’s a highly sophisticated and irresistible sound with LOAH labeling what she does as “ArtSoul”. That’s an ideal descriptor for a song like “Nothing” that highlights her superb voice full of richness and color, but also showcases LOAH‘s compositional skills as “Nothing” is a gorgeously constructed song that’s instantly memorable.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

The Thoughtful Absurdity of 'Spaceplan'

// Moving Pixels

"Spaceplan is a goofy game that still manages to pack a potent emotional punch.

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