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Thursday, Dec 11, 2014
This clip for "The Ride", from Lewis & Clarke's excellent Triumvirate, feels almost cinematic in scope, but the story it tells is personal, intimate, and beautiful.

This fall, Lewis & Clarke, the musical project from singer-songwriter Lou Rogai, released the excellent and expansive Triumvirate. It was Rogai’s first new release in five years. A short documentary, titled The Silver Sea, portrayed the album as a document of closure, of moving on from a tumultuous chapter in Rogai’s life. Now, Rogai presents the next chapter in that story with a new video for “The Ride”, perhaps the best song on Triumvirate, an album full of them.


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Thursday, Dec 11, 2014
When it comes to modern online experiences, Nintendo soars one moment and then stumbles the next.

Like any dutiful Wii U owner (or, for that matter, any Wii U owner at all), I’ve been playing a lot of Mario Kart 8 and Super Smash Bros. for Wii U lately. Both games have significant online components, which has me reviewing Nintendo’s approach to the modern video game landscape. To be fair, the Wii was a connected console, but its adventures on the Internet were quite shallow compared to its successor. Seeing some marquee Nintendo games embrace current expectations around multiplayer and social content is exciting, but there are still plenty of oddities and ambiguities to resolve.


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Wednesday, Dec 10, 2014
Catchy and upbeat with unmissable hand-claps, Chuck Prophet's "The Left Hand and the Right Hand" answers the question: what is the sound of two hands clapping?

The video for Chuck Prophet’s “The Left Hand and the Right Hand” is weirdly surreal by taking the song literally, with two separate disembodied hands floating around to illustrate the story. Chuck Prophet appears in a cartoon bubble as an all-seeing narrator in an alternative universe. It’s kind of trippy and fun.


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Wednesday, Dec 10, 2014
Gonzo yet muffled, Under the Bubble is more interesting for its breakthrough in 3D filmmaking than its dramatic bona fides.

Arch Oboler, an important figure in the history of radio drama, is most remembered for shaping the Lights Out horror series, a clear inspiration to Rod Serling’s The Twilight Zone. As far as his forays into cinema are concerned, he’s most famous for his innovations in the stereoscopic process known as 3D.


Although 3D experiments had been around for decades, Oboler took a chance on creating America’s first commercially released 3D feature (and in color), 1952’s Bwana Devil, which became a hit that kicked off the ‘50s craze. Over a decade later, he created the first film in a revised 3D process (billed as Space Vision) that used a single camera to shoot two images on one filmstrip for a projector with a special lens, as opposed to the more cumbersone process of two cameras and projectors. This became the standard 3D process for the next 30 years.


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Wednesday, Dec 10, 2014
Pink Floyd gets the jam band blues treatment in Gov't Mule's latest live album, Dark Side of the Mule.

Lost in the lore and progressive psychedelia of their segmented history, Pink Floyd are rarely if ever mentioned alongside their British blues-rock counterparts. Named after two famous blues musicians and early live shows including blues songs, Pink Floyd only hinted at traditional blues in name (see the Syd Barrett-penned “Jugband Blues”). Yet there is no denying the blues influence David Gilmour brought to the band, from “More Blues” which appeared on 1969’s More to his many Stratocaster solos during and following the Roger Waters era.


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