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by G. Christopher Williams

16 Nov 2016

I beat Zero Time Dilemma, a 20+ hour game, in five minutes.

This actually wasn’t hard to accomplish. Zero Time Dilemma‘s narrative structure is based on a series of branching storylines, the root of which is a choice determined by a coin flip. I won that coin flip. The nine potential victims of the maniacal Zero were saved from having to experience his series of puzzles and death traps as the result of my lucky guess. The credits rolled.

by PopMatters Staff

15 Nov 2016

Andrew Paschal: The vocals here sit in an uncomfortable liminal space between singing and spoken word, taking on a rueful and bittersweet approach to storytelling. When I saw that the song is seven minutes long I settled in for an epic, but before I knew it, “Call Yourself Renee” was wrapping up and I realized I’d been staring out the window the whole time. Personally, I didn’t find this to be an absorbing tale in its own right, but it proved a solid vehicle for my own personal daydreams. [6/10]

by PopMatters Staff

15 Nov 2016

Adriane Pontecorvo: Tinariwen’s Tuareg blues have never needed lyrical interpretation for the language-limited; the feeling always bleeds through. Here, the Sahara’s own rock stars lament the current state of their home desert, of the constant power struggles that stain the region. The desert night echoes through “Ténéré Tàqqàl” with warm breezes and the twang of incomparable guitars; Tinariwen continues to tell an unending story of struggle with that vast beauty, with the combined power of sand and string. Like everything the group does, this single sways and pulls at the heartstrings, pure expression through both music and lyrics. As always, no melancholy is more sincere and no tale more elegantly told than Tinariwen’s. [10/10]

by PopMatters Staff

15 Nov 2016

Andrew Paschal: An unrepentant reach for pure synth pleasure, “Closing Shot” succeeds on most all accounts. I was hooked from the first few seconds and Lindstrøm held my attention throughout the five-minute running time. It’s all here, from the playful bass line to the delectable electronic gradients to the game show synth-stabs. Lindstrøm isn’t trying to reinvent the wheel here, he’s just trying to help us have a good time and not take things too seriously. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

15 Nov 2016

Steve Horowitz: The sound of the future as brought to you by THE PAST—zoom, Elroy you’re all grown up! The vocals aren’t sung as much as mumbled clearly because even hearing the words makes one think one can’t understand them because they don’t fit together. And it is all fun. This is a love song and does a good job of capturing the silly, mixed up feeling. The distortions and effects reinforce the feelings of insecurity of needing someone else. In addition the video images:  the purple pants, cool car, and desert scenery do the two performers justice as it makes their pretensions nerdy and human. [8/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Searching for Wholesome Online Fun: LDS Gamers

// Moving Pixels

"While being skeptical about the Church ever officially endorsing video games, LDS gamers remains hopeful about the future, knowing that Mormon society is slowly growing to appreciate gaming.

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