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Monday, Aug 25, 2014
Tired of the Kardashians and their kind? Sorry, but they are keeping an industry alive.

Though you might not recall it, Jessica Simpson actually entered the celebrity realm as a pop singer, though not a particularly successful one. Later, she gained greater fame as a reality star (of Newlyweds on MTV from 2003-2005) and then as a go-to punchline based upon her ditzy TV persona. Today, she is primarily known for a brand of shoes she sells exclusively at Macy’s. 


For someone’s who is, today, best known as a shoe designer with a medium-priced line, Simpson nevertheless gets an awful lot of attention, with frequent mentions on TMZ, in Us Weekly and in other publications, both online and in print. Her recent wedding was profiled in an issue of People magazine with a multi-page spread.


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Monday, Aug 25, 2014
This YA tearjerker could have worked, and it should have worked, but it had it's own demise already written into its DNA.

When the returns came in for The Fault in Our Stars, two studios must have been beyond happy. 20th Century Fox financed the film version of John Green’s popular YA novel, and were glad to see their old fashioned disease of the week tearjerker bring in over $48 million at the box office opening weekend. By the time the end of Summer rolls around, it will easily have banked more than $271 million worldwide.


This should have been good news for Warner Bros. as well, seeing as how it bet on another YA weeper, If I Stay, to further commercialize, and therefore capitalize on the trend. Prior to the 22 August release date, industry pundits had it easily winning the box office war, what with the nine years in the making Sin City sequel and a faith-based football title, When the Game Stands Tall, it’s only real competition. Surely it could mimic The Fault in Our Stars‘s success while beating back any lingering love for a bunch of mutant ninja turtles and a dancing tree creature and his pals.


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Monday, Aug 25, 2014
Their last song is a bit of a party-ending lark (a cover of Petula Clark's "Downtown"), but cooling down is just the move needed to close out one of the greatest pop albums in history.

For an album as giddy, raw, punkish, fun, and overall exciting as The B-52’s is, it is actually somewhat fitting that the final song on it isn’t only a cover, but also a stripped down, laid-back, celebratory send-off to one of the finest discs in the history of pop music.


Clocking in at just under 40 minutes, part of what made The B-52’s so special was the fact that while the band certainly borrowed tropes from B-movies, vintage shops, and forgotten New Wave 45s to create a universe that was all its own, it wound up creating an album that was musically well-considered and very assertive (sometimes even downright aggressive) with lyrics that were offbeat, wacky, and hinting at real human emotions when you weren’t distracted by their bizarre turns towards the sci-fi. Outside of “There’s a Moon in the Sky (Called the Moon)”, where the song’s title proves better than the song itself, The B-52’s is truly one of the greatest pop albums ever made. The B-52’s were never able to fully recreate the magic captured here (and boy howdy did they try sometimes), but after introducing us to their own unique and strange world with such unbelievable conviction, closing with a Petula Clark cover just seems absolutely fitting.


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Monday, Aug 25, 2014
To celebrate the launch of their new Times Square location, Guitar Center invited the Roots to headline the party.

The Roots’ first show since their manager Richard Nichols died in July was a celebration for Guitar Center’s new store in Times Square. Aside from having their banners on stage, the sponsor didn’t have much else to do once the Roots took control of the audience just after 10 pm. As Entertainment Weekly wrote, “The band took the stage at New York’s Best Buy Theater Thursday to celebrate Guitar Center’s 50th anniversary, kicking off their set with a rousing performance of “Table of Contents (Parts 1 & 2)” off their 1999 album Things Fall Apart. Sousaphonist Tuba Gooding Jr. kicked up his knees and marches across the stage as he played, often looking like he’d been transported from a 4th of July parade, and Black Thought bounced around as he rapped.” You can check out photos of Black Thought bouncing below or find a larger gallery of images over on Facebook.


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Friday, Aug 22, 2014
The latest tune from young rock up-and-comers StarBenders is proof that if you put your mind to writing a song about sex, you'll probably succeed.

On their Tumblr page, up-and-coming rockers StarBenders describe their sound as akin to “Iggy Pop playing 7 minutes in heaven with Katy Perry.” It’s a bold and playful declaration, one that’s befitting of the group’s youthful presence. However, the Iggy Pop comparison also hints at the punk edge that rears its head throughout the otherwise thoroughly poppy songs StarBenders play. “Touch”, a tune from their forthcoming self-titled EP, is an ideal representation of the band’s style.


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