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by Sarah Zupko

12 Oct 2016

New Orleans-based singer-songwriter Luke Winslow-King draws from a long list of American roots genres to concoct his Americana songs, including blues, folk, jazz and ragtime. He’s formally studied music in universities and in the Czech Republic, while having seen a lot of the world through his peripatetic musical career. Winslow-King recently released his fifth album, I’m Glad Trouble Don’t Last Always, and it’s a record rooted in the sadness and heartbreak that arises due to the end of a marriage that ultimately ends with a form of acceptance and forgiveness. As the finale of the record, “No More Crying Today” carries this forgiveness, as well as the resolution to feel good again, stop crying, and move on with one’s life. It’s a deft, gentle, relaxed song with delicate, subtle guitar lines, the hushed vocals of a man worn out from pain, and yet another example of Winslow-King’s masterful songwriting skills.

by PopMatters Staff

12 Oct 2016

Andrew Paschal: Dirty Projectors return with this emotionally complex, multifarious number. David Longstreth’s vocals glide elusively between naked crooning and a kind of wry, winking humor. He makes himself stunningly vulnerable and then seems to shrug it all off with a sad smile, as people do when coping with heartbreak. By turns, he is both cagey and devastatingly honest. The straightforward piano balladry combines with squeaking vocal snatches, samples of both themselves and Dan Deacon, and glitchy beats to add to the overall impact, no less affecting for being so disorienting. [8/10]

by G. Christopher Williams

12 Oct 2016

The board game Posthuman offers its players two potential win-states, the first, a fairly common one, the victory of the individual, the second, an extremely unusual one in a competitive game, a communal victory. This is a really strange tension in a competitive game, and one that seems at odds with our expectations about the principles of competition. Essentially, Posthuman suggests that if a player can’t win, then they can damn well make sure that everyone wins.

This idea seems at odds with competitive play, perhaps even more so, since more often than not when folks do compete knowing that they can’t win, then it’s our expectation, perhaps, that they will choose a scorched earth strategy: if I can’t win, then no one should win. In both instances, the ideas that a single player should win a game or that “if you can’t win, then no one should win” both seem like ones that lean heavily on the central importance of individualism to the competitive experience.

by Diane Leach

12 Oct 2016

A quick perusal of The Chef’s Library’s pretty dust jacket is enough to make any armchair cook’s mouth water. “Which cookbooks do the great chefs use?” wonders the back cover in snazzy red typeface. Author Jenny Linford finds out, querying 72 professional chefs, coupling their answers with brief biographies and glossy photographs.

Yet pretty dust jackets can deceive. Only chapter one of The Chef’s Library addresses chefs’ favorites books. Chapters two and three are devoted to “Influential Cookbooks” and a “Cookbook Directory”, neither utilizing chefs’ input as to why the included culinary texts were chosen over others. The resulting book, while attractive, is not a serious work. More on this in a moment.

by Sachyn Mital

11 Oct 2016

The 5th annual Global Citizen Festival continued the success of past iterations by generating support for a variety of international social causes. Through actions and commitments driven by the public, either with intent to attend the free show or through a prompt from a performer (notably Rihanna asked her fans to call Canadian PM Justin Trudeau to boost funding for foreign health programs), Global Citizens are making measurable impact.

As the GCF press release notes, “these commitments and announcements are worth $1.9 billion, and are set to reach 199 million people, and put the world on track to achieving the Global Goals for Sustainable Development. Global Citizens will continue to use these commitments to hold governments and businesses accountable to deliver on their promises in the years to come.” Some specifics follow select performance highlights and a few photos.

//Mixed media

The Horrors, the Horrors, or Get Your Halloween On

// Short Ends and Leader

"This bevy of B or Z horrors upclassed to Blu-ray will help you get scared the old-fashioned way.

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