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by Brice Ezell

22 May 2015

Had the stars aligned a certain way, and Scott Walker had started off his musical career in 2015 Brooklyn rather than mid-‘60s United Kingdom, he could well have made the music of JOBS. Somewhere underneath “Patient Angel”, a track off of JOBS’ forthcoming killer BOB sings LP, there’s a simple pop song. Yet it’s buried beneath layers of latticework noise and bursts of dissonant asides, to the point that the song’s center, its core, becomes obfuscated by the band’s experimental leaps. This, of course, is the delight of “Patient Angel”: it takes you for a ride. Just when you’ve set your expectations for it, this Brooklyn trio will take a tangent that will challenge what you know about music. Like the aforementioned Walker, the music of JOBS always has its toes dipped in recognizable song structures and tropes, but it never jumps all the way in.

“Patient Angel” now has a music video to match its mercurial structure, with psychedelic and eye-searing flashes of brilliant color tracking and enhancing the shifts in the tune itself.

by Jason Mendelsohn and Eric Klinger

22 May 2015

Mendelsohn: One more spin on the Pink Floyd space shuttle, Klinger. Are you ready? This will be the last go around. As much as I love this band, as large as they loom in my rock psyche, there aren’t too many other albums in their repertoire that I think merit extended examination: maybe Animals, maybe Meddle, maybe even their late-game return with Division Bell. This week will mark the fourth Pink Floyd record we’ve discussed—at number 207 is Wish You Were Here.

Klinger: And given my ambivalence toward Pink Floyd, I’m of two minds as to how to react to this announcement. Part of me wants to thank you, and yet another part of me wants to make you listen to The Final Cut just for making me go through all this so many times.

by Nick Dinicola

22 May 2015

In Dark Souls, you always knew when a boss was coming. The big bad was always behind a “fog door”, a wall of smoke that separated the boss arena from the rest of the level. It would automatically close behind you, locking you in, forcing you to fight or die. Fog doors became intimidating; they were warnings demanding your attention and respect, shouting at us “This way lies death!” Passing through the fog was not a decision to be taken lightly. Passing through the fog meant you were ready for a fight.

by Sachyn Mital

21 May 2015

When Tahliah Barnett, aka FKA twigs, performs, she doesn’t require super elaborate stage setups to fix the audience’s gaze. Her wild dance moves, her seductive yet fashionable attire and her synchronized light show command attention. However, her ambitious ‘Congregata’ show, which premiered in London earlier this year, is ten times as wild as her regular show. ‘Congregata’ was brought to New York City for three sold-out nights as part of the Red Bull Music Academy month-long series of events. Taking place at the Brooklyn Hangar, ‘Congregata’ was a hot, sweaty show, and not just for the dancers. The warehouse was downright swampy before the show event began. But for those in attendance, the show was a wild mix of dancers (including Leiomy Maldonado), powerful lights, ornate costumes and of course, FKA twigs in full force, all choreographed with precision to create a two-hour long epic event. There wasn’t even a scheduled break for twigs to talk with the audience, though she did share some genuine love for her family and friends once it was over. With all the flash, it was possible to lose track of the musical progression, which varied through twig’s released material and some other instrumental fillers. But at the cohesive peaks, ‘Congregata’ is a stunning performance inspired by all that FKA twigs is and does and one that promises even greater theatrical and musical endeavors will come.

by Brice Ezell

21 May 2015

Songs about breakups are a dime a dozen, but there’s a reason why that’s the case: it’s a powerful universal emotion that has a million different angles to it. No one song can be all-encompassing in its examination of the lovelorn state. Mississippi’s own the Shoe Birds know this, and for their take on heartbreak, “You Leave Me Blind” they craft an anthemic, driving pop/rock number that culminates in its sing-along ready chorus.

“You Leave Me Blind” can be found on the Shoe Birds’ forthcoming Southern Gothic LP.

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