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Wednesday, Apr 1, 2015
Episode 10 of Pop Unmuted looks at legendary pop producer/songwriter Max Martin, his 30 year career, and his latest hit with Ellie Goulding's "Love Me Like You Do."

Pop Unmuted is a podcast dedicated to in-depth discussion of pop music from varying critical and academic perspectives. On Episode 10, Scott Interrante and Kurt Trowbridge are joined by Melbourne, Australia-based pop podcaster Daniel Gregg and Music Theory PhD candidate Megan Lavengood to talk about legendary pop producer and songwriter Max Martin. We then delve deeper into his most recent hit, Ellie Goulding’s “Love Me Like You Do”, and close with a special Max Martin themed Unmuted Pop Songs segment.


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Wednesday, Apr 1, 2015
If games are based on systems of rules, they seem the least likely of mediums for the anarchic sensibilities of punk. In PUNKSNOTDEAD, you punch until you die. That's the game.

A synopsis of the content of PUNKSNOTDEAD, an indie game made in 12 hours in 2013, is explained by mooosh, the game’s developer: “12HOURS/1979/GET PUNCHED/PUNKS NOT DEAD/EAT SHIT.“ To which, I can only respond that if punk’s not dead, then, well, fair enough. I hear you.


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Tuesday, Mar 31, 2015
With Ephemeral, the Minneapolis group Umami has concocted a mad scientist's stew of synth-pop, dance rock, and a smattering of other sounds.

Ephemeral is a fitting title for the new album by the Minneapolis outfit Umami. Although identifiable pop song structures are featured throughout the LP, the smorgasbord of sounds that Umami brings to the table constantly keep the listener on edge. One idea will suddenly give way to something else entirely without a moment’s notice, foregrounding a psychedelic, more free-form take on synth and electro-pop. Yet for all of the ephemeral moments throughout this Ephemeral LP, there’s a clear core to the songwriting. Contrast is one of the main constants that keeps the experimentation fresh throughout: see the juxtaposition of sharp buzzsaw synths and airy, reverb-laden vocals on “Living in a Nightmare”.


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Tuesday, Mar 31, 2015
This late '50s seafaring comedy is pleasant if uninspired.

All at Sea, called Barnacle Bill in England, is an Ealing comedy starring Alec Guinness, but there’s a reason you never hear it mentioned in the same breath with Kind Hearts and Coronets, The Lavender Hill Mob, The Man in the White Suit, or The Lady Killers—except in the hopeful trailer, which claims it’s the best of them all. It’s a nice, modest, and pleasant little effort that clearly comes from the same sensibilities without being as inspired.


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Tuesday, Mar 31, 2015
As a tie-in to the recent release of the 40th anniversary edition of Physical Graffiti, Led Zeppelin have released an "interactive video" for "Brandy and Coke", the initial rough mix of the classic "Trampled Under Foot".

In my 8 out of 10 PopMatters review of the deluxe reissue of Led Zeppelin’s Physical Graffiti, I wrote, “Released 40 years to the day since its initial release [24 February], this deluxe edition confirms what critics have long said about this… ‘summative’ recording: this is an album that gives a lot, and then keeps on giving.” As it turns out, this principle not only applies to the revered double album itself, but also to the video media that accompanies it. Led Zeppelin have now released a swanky “interactive” video for one of the deluxe edition’s bonus tracks, the “initial rough mix” of “Trampled Under Foot” entitled “Brandy and Coke”. As you watch the video, you can click through the many windows of the iconic building that makes up the record’s sleeve art.


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