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by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016

Emmanuel Elone: It would be really easy to hate this song. Super Furry Animals lays on the “bing bong” line heavily across all five minutes of “BingBong’s” runtime, and there are moments in the beginning that feel obnoxious and frustrating as a result. However, once you look past the lack of lyrical ideas and the fairly excessive runtime, “BingBong” is actually pretty great. The beat is steady, and has a fantastic bass line at its core, while the simple lyrics float over the rhythm as another instrument of sorts. When “BingBong” is not being occasionally annoying, it’s fun, catchy and energetic, making it a great hit for the summer. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016

Pryor Stroud: Cryptic, moody, and possessed by a nearly Lynchian sense of unease, “New Age Thriller” is a demented avant-pop vignette that watches two lovers slip behind a wall of shadow to perform strange sexual acts. U.S. Girls—the alias for noise-art iconoclast Meghan Remy—drapes the track’s singsong melody in bizarre synth chimes and dark, monolithic electro tones that seem to rise out of the track’s background. “And I won’t provide it for you / Even though you / Even though you’ll force me to”, Remy sings, and you can sense that her lover is across from her behind a shifting curtain of darkness, his palm outstretched, beckoning her to step away from the light for a while. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

20 May 2016

Pryor Stroud: Charged with gargling synths, metronomic percussion, and a vocal ripped straight out of the ‘80s fem-rock playbook, “Never Going to Die” is the debut single from Mary Jane Dunphe’s new synthpop project CC DUST. While on the surface this is a relatively straightforward electro-punk ballad, the details here deserve additional scrutiny: the foregrounded synthesizer drones are rough-edged, thick, even dirty, and Dunphe’s voice—a hoarse, up-from-the-gut warble—seems determined to fight against them. It’s as if she’s trying to free herself from the track’s sonic muck and, by extension, the oppressive sense of mortality that has begun to feel like a shackle against her skin. [7/10]

by Nick Dinicola

20 May 2016

With the release of Dark Souls III, there’s been lots of talk about the series as a whole, its history and its impact, including how it’s frightening, how it’s funny, how it’s hard, how it’s not that hard, how it’s communal, how it’s isolationist, how its story is told, how its combat has evolved, how its design has evolved, how its popularity has evolved… lots of talk. But within all that, there’s one thing that I haven’t seen anyone touch on before: how oddly relaxing this type of game can be.

by PopMatters Staff

19 May 2016

Pryor Stroud: “I Need a Forest Fire” is perhaps best understood—and listened to—as a perfectly balanced collaboration between the two artists it features. Here, you can hear both of them vividly, as if they somehow happened to write and record the exact same song simultaneously and then, discovering that the other stumbled upon an identical slice of ether-drenched indie pop, decided to intermix their efforts into one singular composition. Indeed, “Forest Fire” seamlessly pools Blake’s ghost-soul vocal melodies with Bon Iver’s grayscale, heart-ripped-open songcraft style. The result is, needless to say, solemn, but the solemnity it conveys does not feel overblown or melodramatic or strategically manufactured. It feels, in a word, real, like a heartbreak from your past that you’ve been afraid to revisit. [8/10]

//Mixed media
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From Hungary to Hollywood: "The Undesirable"

// Short Ends and Leader

"At just over an hour, a lot happens in this broadly gestured, melodramatic story set in Transylvania.

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