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Latest Blog Posts

by Mantas Krisciunas

6 Dec 2016

We realized that there is a decent amount of opposition towards video games in the church, particularly from older members. I wanted to have a place where Mormon gamers could talk about games without feeling ostracized or belittled. For almost a year it was just me and zoomop on my old account until about a year ago LDSG_ghost approached me. He had made a similar community elsewhere and wanted to combine them. 
—TheKaelen, moderator of /r/ldsgamers.

Video games aren’t yet known for their portrayal of the full spectrum of human diversity. While the medium is arguably making slow progress when it comes to race, gender and sexuality, other building blocks of a person’s identity are still waiting to be tackled. One of those is religion.

by G. Christopher Williams

5 Dec 2016

This week we return to one of our first episodes of the podcast, a time when we were focusing on how different narrative genres are represented in video games. A focus on combat seems a reasonable enough one in beginning an exploration of the specific types of stories told in games. After all, given gaming’s tendency towards competitiveness rather than co-operation, many modern games find the battlefield an apt enough place to tell stories.

This podcast was hosted by Rick Dakan, and included Moving Pixels contributors, G. Christopher Williams, Nick Dinicola, and Thomas Cross.

by Nick Dinicola

2 Dec 2016

The Cube Escape games are series of free puzzle games on iOS and Android. I downloaded them all at the same time (because, free), but after getting through the first one, I wanted to delete the rest immediately. Instead, I played a few more of the games, just to see if the puzzle design might improve. After all, maybe that first game was awkward and bad because it was actually someone’s first game. Turns out, they don’t get better, and I kind of hate them all. Yet I kept playing. Eventually I broke down… and played the rest with a walkthrough open beside me. I wasn’t going to try and solve these shitty puzzles on my own. I was just going to get through the games as fast as possible. Because even though I kind of hated them, I was also hooked on them.

by Jorge Albor

1 Dec 2016

I’m used to inhabiting the skin of others. I’ve been elves, dwarves, massive bro-dudes, and young girls. I’ve captained spaceships, maintained small cottages, and poked around a college dorm room. Games have always given me opportunities to live the stories of others, to be someone I’m not. For many of us, this is one of the biggest reasons we play games. Lately, though, I’ve been trying to reconcile the uncomfortable politics of being someone else.

When I was 11 or 12 years old, my older brother pulled my sister and I out of school to attend a political protest. It was a pivotal moment in developing my political self. The protest was against California Proposition 187, which would severely limit access to public services to undocumented immigrants. This included restrictions on access to healthcare and public education to children. I can’t say I was an expert on immigration at such a young age, but some of my family members were undocumented. I knew it felt wrong.

by G. Christopher Williams

28 Nov 2016

Following up on our discussions of Amnesia: The Dark Descent and Amnesia: A Machine for Pigs, we are now discussing the slow burn sci fi horror of Soma.

Soma considers philosophical questions concerning the relationship between the body and the mind, a topic we dive into head first this week.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Searching for Wholesome Online Fun: LDS Gamers

// Moving Pixels

"While being skeptical about the Church ever officially endorsing video games, LDS gamers remains hopeful about the future, knowing that Mormon society is slowly growing to appreciate gaming.

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