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Latest Blog Posts

by G. Christopher Williams

16 Aug 2017

Building a fort is a classic form of play. Be your material cardboard, wood, or just the sofa cushions, as a kid there’s something compelling about holing up while imagining battling the forces of evil and also something compelling about building a structure to serve as your home base for a little while.

Some of this pleasure, perhaps, speaks to the appeal of crafting and base building games. From Minecraft to Conan: Exiles to Rust, there’s clearly something bringing gamers back to the idea of spending some time gathering resources, erecting walls, and building a little oasis for themselves in the sometimes difficult environs of these games.

by Nick Dinicola

9 Aug 2017

I was terribly disappointed by Assassin’s Creed: Syndicate when I first played it in 2015. It was entertaining and fun, but it also felt cynically designed to appeal to the lowest common denominator gamer. Everything felt so painfully generic, from the “lovable rogue” protagonists to the flashy-yet-boring combat. All the things that Assassin’s Creed: Unity did to complicate the franchise—challenging combat, and a morally ambiguous story—were reversed with Syndicate. I didn’t like it.

by Nick Dinicola

7 Aug 2017

This week Nick and Eric are joined by Max Bernard of YouTube’s ‘Great Levels of Gaming’ to talk about giant mechs, the intelligence level of artificial intelligence, and of course some great level design.

by G. Christopher Williams

31 Jul 2017

We’ve reached the middle of Telltale’s effort to blend the point-and-click adventure with a First Person Shooter.

This week we discuss more hijinks from Tales from the Borderlands.

by Nick Dinicola

25 Jul 2017

Environment, setting, location, world; regardless of the word used to describe it, the place in which a game occurs is hugely important. A game can be defined by its place, like Rapture defines BioShock and like the USG Ishimura defines Dead Space, or a place can drag a game through the mud of boredom, like how the Hinterlands drags down Dragon Age: Inquisition and the dullness of Mordor weighs on Middle Earth: Shadow of Mordor.

A game’s setting usually falls somewhere along this spectrum: The better the setting the more it improves the game, the worse the setting the more it hurts the game. Makes sense. It’s rare that you find an interesting setting that still somehow hurts the game. Knee Deep is that rare, unfortunate game.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Gremlins and the Housewife in 'Don't Be Afraid of the Dark'

// Short Ends and Leader

"The house itself wants to pull the neurotic woman into its maw and absorb her whole as a literal housewife.

READ the article