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As online streaming services continue to grow in developing original programming—Netflix (House of Cards, Orange is the New Black) and Amazon (Transparent) being two examples—other sites have taken on their lead. Vimeo is one such website; last year, the company produced a series called High Maintenance, which documents a pot dealer (Ben Sinclair, show creator along with Katja Blichfield) and the customers he encounters on a daily basis. After facing a surprising success given Vimeo’s status as a relatively underdeveloped player in the realm of original programming, many have taken notice. Enter: HBO.

Grace (Jane Fonda) and Frankie (Lily Tomlin) have a problem. Their husbands (played by Michael Sheen and Sam Waterston) are in love—with each other. When the two men announce their intentions to leave their wives and be with each other, Grace and Frankie’s world gets taken for a spin, and no small one, at that.

A man stands alone, wearing a designer suit and a shit-eating grin. An anonymous skyline occupies the backdrop behind him, imposed on a green screen. On occasion, some scuzzy-looking dude wearing a bikini top pops into frame. For over ten years, that has been the vehicle that delivers bite-sized pieces of TV at its trashiest right into your home, sealed with a snarky one-liner and a kiss.

Shonda Rhimes’ How to Get Away With Murder is a show with a lot of hype behind it, and rightly so. It’s hard to deny the series’ first season didn’t make a strong impression. It threw together an awesome and diverse cast, a fun episodic formula, and a serialized mystery that definitely hangs with the best of them.

That said, it was How to Get Away With Murder’s blend of contemporary college drama and sprawling murder-mystery that stuck with me the most, because it evoked a fascinating set of similarities to Donna Tartt’s seminal campus-murder novel, The Secret History.

By now we know that there have been several “self-styled” kings, and many that have claimed the rights to Game of Thrones’ kingdom of Westeros. Whether you have read all of George R.R. Martin’s books to date, or are only a fan of the television series, we have been subjected to a parade of aspiring leaders that all feel they have a claim to the Iron Throne.

But of these wannabes, which of these actually would make a good ruler? Which of them actually has a true and valid claim? Which of these people would avid readers and watchers of the Game of Thrones universe actually like to see sitting atop the Iron Throne?

//Blogs

Blood and Thunder: Clutch Let the Rhythm Hit ‘Em!

// Sound Affects

"Mastodon may be American metal giants, but based on their Saskatchewan gig with Clutch, they could learn a thing or two from their cult favorite Maryland comrades.

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