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by PopMatters Staff

8 Sep 2016

The US presidential election of 2016 is scheduled for 8 November 2016, where the 45th President of the United States will likely be determined. Discussions and debates surrounding the event have been charged, to say the least. This is an excellent opportunity to cut through the hype and the rhetoric to explore the nature and depictions of elections, both within reality and in fiction.

To be a part of this historic conversation, PopMatters seeks submissions about elections in popular media, including but not limited to: presidential elections as they are represented in the media, political elections within film and television; high-school / sorority elections in media; film policy shifts, pledges, and promises; award voting controversies; the sci-fi and western genres and elections; nominated / randomly / unwittingly selected participants; and electoral commentary in videogames, cartoons, literature and other media.

by PopMatters Staff

25 Jul 2016

Deadline for Features pitches: 12 August 2016

Deadline for final, polished articles: 9 September 2016

When Star Trek debuted on NBC on September 8, 1966, there was little indication that its longevity across multiple platforms (films, series, books) would rival that of series such as Doctor Who, or that the series (and its fans) would become fixtures of popular culture, objects of academic study, and an outsized influence on science fiction.

by Sean Fennell

20 Jul 2016

It’s amazing but in just a few short months Preacher has already carved a nice little groove for itself in an overly congested television landscape. It did so by refusing to do all the things that television fans often demand—most notably an easily understood plot—and did so with an almost mocking bravado. It has been an opening season that’s been at its best when it throwing things at the wall to see if they stick, which they have with almost otherworldly consistency.

We all knew this had to come to end. That showrunners Evan Goldberg, Sam Rami, and Seth Rogen had to eventually reign in all the stray parts of the series and build toward something substantial and concrete. Maybe I knew, but it hasn’t helped the fact that the last couple episodes, which feature a show creating boundaries instead of blasting through them, have been just the least bit disappointing.

by Anthony Merino

19 Jul 2016

The A Word is a family drama centered around Joe Hughes (Max Vento), a five-year-old child with autism. The show opens with Joe’s uncle, Eddie Scott (Greg McHugh)—who’s coming home with his adulterous wife Dr. Nicola Daniels (Vinette Robinson) to live with his brother—trying to navigate a car with a small trailer up a driveway. The visual is a great, if unintended, metaphor for the episode as a whole. Writer Peter Bowker seems to be trying to combine a social realism drama with an absurdist farce. Director Peter Cattaneo’s lingering shots and documentary feel add to the weirdness of it all.

It’s an utter shame because the best parts of the show depict the family dealing with coming to terms with Joe’s condition. The other melodramatic stories at best distract and at worst undermine the believability of the family’s central crisis.

by Sachyn Mital

11 Jul 2016

It’s a few years since Comedy Central had their last event at Summerstage (Stars Under the Stars), which featured then rising talent Amy Schumer. This year, Comedy Central hosted a show with talent from their flagship show The Daily Show with Trevor Noah: Ronny Chieng, Jordan Klepper, Adam Lowitt, Desi Lydic, Hasan Minhaj, Michelle Wolf, and Roy Wood Jr. on Sunday, June 26. The free event was an “extra night of work”, joked Klepper, who quickly realized the audience hadn’t paid to get in either. He was probably “disappointed” that he and co-emcee Lydic were decked out for the night—chumps fawning for a crowd. Nonetheless, Klepper and Lydic proved gracious hosts, and introduced all the performers with baby pictures of that individual.

I find it difficult to translate comedy into a review, given I’d essentially spoil some excellent punch lines, but I can mention a couple of highlights. There was Wolf’s hilarious bit where she read texts from a person she dated, including the fake idiom “chipping away at the ham”. Noah himself offered great commentary on Rihanna being strong enough to withstand the rap artists guesting on her tracks, as he deftly imitated the body motions of a singer. There were many, many other laughs earned during the nearly two hour show; the audience responded heartily to each talent, even staying after the show was over to try and meet the comedians. Photos from the event are below.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

That Ribbon of Highway: Sharon Jones Re-shapes Woody Guthrie's Song

// Sound Affects

"Sharon Jones and Woodie Guthrie knew: great songs belong to everybody.

READ the article