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by Fergus Halliday

3 Jun 2015

First airing in September 2006, the first season of NBC’s Heroes found its audience in a big way. It combined an interesting cast, slick special effects (for the time), and a sprawling mythology to bring superpowers to the small screen that, in retrospect, really set the stage for today’s superhero TV line-up. However, Heroes’ success proved short-lived, as each successive season grew more convoluted and threw away a lot of the goodwill its debut garnered.

This year, the series is set to return with Heroes: Reborn, and there’s every reason to suspect it could be a real phoenix-rising moment for the show.

by PopMatters Staff

3 Jun 2015

PopMatters (est. 1999) is a respected source for smart long-form reading on a wide range of topics in culture. PopMatters serves as a bridge between academia and popular culture. Thus, our articles are written in an engaging style that is both entertaining and erudite, yet free of stiff and cloistered academic language, and of course, far removed from the novice, the hype and the naiveté that crowds online media.

PopMatters articles appeal to cultural omnivores, historians, pop culture enthusiasts and intellectuals and geeks of many stripes. Our essayists approach their subjects with a strong respect for and knowledge of history—and with an eye toward where they think we may be heading next.

Feature essays are a minimum of 1,200 words, and there is no maximum limit, so long as the essay warrants the length. You may pitch a single essay, or a series of articles. We’d love to hear your ideas.

by Steve Leftridge

21 May 2015

When David Letterman first announced his plans to retire from The Late Show a few months ago, I was somewhat surprised but not initially devastated. In the back of my mind, I knew that he was in his late 60s, that he had outlasted Jay Leno as the final member of his generation still hosting a late-night talk show, and that he’d be hanging it up sooner rather than later. But I still wasn’t ready. Now that he has officially wrapped up his show with his Wednesday, 20 May broadcast, I, like the other fans who grew up watching him every night, am bracing for life without Dave.

by Brice Ezell

14 May 2015

Winner of the 2005 Hugo Award and longlisted for the 2004 Man Booker Prize, Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell by Susanna Clarke is a lengthy and complex alternate history of England, set in the 19th century during the Napoleonic Wars. With extensive footnoting and a lengthy backstory of a fictional history of magic in England, the novel is undoubtedly a titanic work, one that famed fantasy author Neil Gaiman called “unquestionably the finest English novel of the fantastic written in the last 70 years.”

Because of this loftiness, Peter Harness, who has now adapted Clarke’s novel for television, had a difficult task when deciding to take the story on. Starring Eddie Marsan (Norrell) and Bertie Carvel (Strange), the television version of Jonathan Strange & Mr. Norrell will see its American premiere on BBC America this summer. The show will run as a seven-part miniseries.

by Fergus Halliday

14 May 2015

Despite the absence of the witches, wizards and magic, the everyday drama of J.K. Rowling’s The Casual Vacancy seemed destined to be more difficult to adapt than Harry Potter. Still, it was only a matter of time before the novel made the jump, and while the serialized TV format fits Rowling’s writing far better than the Hollywood blockbuster ever did, the results are a mixed bag.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

A Chat with José González at Newport Folk Festival

// Notes from the Road

"José González's sets during Newport Folk Festival weren't on his birthday (that is today) but each looked to be a special intimate performance.

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