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Monday, Apr 13, 2009
Following in the steps of Joaquin Phoenix, Billy Bob Thornton proves rude and surly (not to mention unbelievably cryptic) in an interview with a Canadian DJ. Once again, we ask: why?

In case you didn’t know, Billy Bob Thornton’s music career hasn’t exactly taken off. Though often marginalized in the same way that Russell Crowe, Bruce Willis, Kevin Spacey, and Keanu Reeves’ musical ventures have been, Thornton at least made a stab at something a bit more legitimate when he decided to form the Boxmasters: a swinging country-pop group that relies heavy on nostalgic “golden age” country production without giving too much consideration for the present. The result? Our own Charles A. Hohman gave the Boxmasters’ debut album the much-dreaded 1/10 score.


Some Hohman’s score this stems from the fact that Thornton—the band’s principal songwriter—often relies on base, juvenile humor to get his point across, unrelenting with the sheer number of vulgarities at his disposal, all in the name of supposed humor.  Naturally, a “celebrity band” is going to take quite a drubbing from the press, and, as such, it’s up to the celebrity in question to do whatever he can to raise the profile of the group in order to get exposure.  Now a few days after the QTV interview, many people know of the Boxmasters—but for all the wrong reasons.


Appearing on The Q Show on CBC, host Jian Ghomeshi happily introduces the Boxmasters, noting how the group has put out three albums of the past 12 months—two of which were double-disc affairs—and soon finds out that the band has at least three more discs already in the can. Things start off like a normal interview, but then, of course, Thornton has to open his mouth. Some of his stories are completely unrelated to the music-oriented discussion that Ghomeshi is leading the band towards, and Thornton, at times, becomes livid over the fact that Ghomeshi mentions his acting career. Best of all, however, is when Ghomeshi makes passing mention about how Thornton is passionate about his music, to which Thorton fires back, asking if he’d ask the same question to Tom Petty.


Confused yet? The world is right there with you. Ghomeshi, it should be noted, does his best to handle things, but also makes sure that the questions he’s asking—the ones that deal with the music, specifically—get answered. Thornton had absolutely no reason to become as introverted and cryptic as he did, which has lead to much widespread speculation that this strange interview (which achieves an Office-level of listener discomfort) is on par with Joaquin Phoenix’s infamous encounter with David Letterman a few months earlier.


The real question, though, is why Thornton chose to act the way that he did. Being irritated over something like mentioning his cinematic achievements is slightly forgivable (we’ve all had bad days, haven’t we?), but going on about building models for a magazine contest without once answering a question about the music he listened to when growing up—it’s curious, to say the least.


Yet was Thornton conscious of his actions? Does he know that behavior like this tends to generate more negative publicity than good word-of-mouth? (Or, to put it another way: does this appearance make you want to actually go out and see the Boxmasters live?) Strangest of all, however, is that the Phoenix and Thornton interviews are both based on the same thing: a noted Hollywood actor turning to a music career and doing a media appearance to promote it. It would be more of an epidemic were it not for the fact that Zooey Deschanel, Jason Schwartzman, and
Scarlett Johansson have all pulled off the transition without this wave of media-crazy—those albums have all achieved respectable amounts of acclaim, even.


So what is Thornton accomplishing with his antics?  More importantly: why do we care?  Until we get some answers, we can at least take solace in the fact that this train wreck is admittedly pretty fun to watch ...



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Friday, Apr 10, 2009

Live and in person, Brooklyn’s the Naked Hearts are explosive, charming, and [something] exciting. With Amy Cooper on hollow-body electric guitar and Noah Wheeler on drums, the impeccably turned-out pair (Noah was in a suit jacket, Amy in leopard-print leggings and a headband when I saw them) ooze a fuzzy rock sincerity; every song is a stripped-down challenge to cut loose. Their debut EP, These Knees doesn’t quite do them justice. The recording gives their notes just a bit too much space, and makes their vocals just a bit too echoey and melancholy. Live, this guitar and drums duo is something like Williamsburg’s 2009 answer to Local H. On record, they’re somewhere between Sleater-Kinney and Sonic Youth. Both versions of the band are fantastic, but I’m partial to the hollow-bodied messiness of their live show. Call me old fashioned. Their EP’s first two tracks, “Cat & Mouse” and “Call Me” are below.


Naked Hearts
“Cat & Mouse” [MP3]
     


“Call Me” [MP3]
     



Tagged as: naked hearts
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Wednesday, Apr 8, 2009
by PopMatters Staff

We Live in Public directed by Ondi Timoner is a timely documentary that looks at the role of the Internet on human interaction and the erosion of the private sphere as told by Josh Harris. The film screened this past week at the Full Frame Documentary Film Festival in Durha, North Carolina.



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Wednesday, Apr 8, 2009
by PopMatters Staff

Man Man go all horror film on us in their new video for “Rabbit Habits”. Actually, it’s more of a mini film than just another music video. Director Lex Halaby says, “It’s really intended as a tribute to classic Hollywood B movies. There’s the Teen Wolf van surfing scene and an homage to several classic horror films. We weren’t really worried about getting it on MTV as much as we just wanted to do something completely original.”


TOUR DATES
April 22, 2009 - The Square Room - Knoxville, TN
April 23, 2009 - The Rev Room - Little Rock, Arkansas
April 24, 2009 - Lounge on Elm St. - Dallas, Texas
April 25, 2009 - Norman Music Festival - Norman, Oklahoma


With Cursive:
April 26, 2009 - Mercy Lounge - Nashville, Tennessee
April 27, 2009 - Bottletree - Birmingham, Alabama
April 28, 2009 - Sluggo’s - Pensacola, Florida
April 29, 2009 - Social - Orlando, Florida
April 30, 2009 - Social - Orlando, Florida
May 1, 2009 - Variety Playhouse - Atlanta, Georgia
May 2, 2009 - Cat’s Cradle - Carrboro, North Carolina
May 3, 2009 - Black Cat - Washington DC, Washington DC
May 4, 2009 - State Theater - State College, Pennsylvania
May 5, 2009 - Diesel - Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania
May 6, 2009 - Magic Stick - Detroit, Michigan


With Gogol Bordello:
May 29, 2009 - Beaumont Club - Kansas City, MO
May 30, 2009 - Cabooze - Minneapolis, MN
May 31, 2009 - Congress Theatre - Chicago, IL
June 04, 2009 - Ram’s Head Live - Baltimore, MD
June 05, 2009 - House Of Blues - Boston, MA
 
 
July 2009 - Rothbury Festival - Rothbury, Michigan


Tagged as: man man
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Wednesday, Apr 8, 2009
by PopMatters Staff

Cartoonist Jeffrey Brown turns his pens on himself in his new autobiographical comic book Funny Misshapen Body out this week on Touchstone. Chronically his development as an artist, the book is compelling enough that Pop Candy is offering excerpts today.


Jeffrey Brown
Funny Misshapen Body [book excerpts]


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