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by PopMatters Staff

2 Feb 2016


Hailing from the chilly climes of Windsor, Ontario, the Blue Stones turn the tables on their environment by playing the hottest kind of rock. Playing as a duo gives their blues rock sound lots of punch, rather like the White Stripes in that sense. The Blues Stones’ 2012 album, How’s That Sound?, charted on Bandcamp’s best-selling list and that combined with buzzed about live shows, puts the group on a path to success for their latest album, Black Holes, which releases this April. Today we are sharing the first single for that upcoming album, charging hard rock number “The Hard Part”.

by PopMatters Staff

1 Feb 2016


Chad Miller: Maybe it’s just the fact that the song has fossil in the name, but Ash Koosha really knows how to put a visual in the mind. Prehistoric scenes flash through the brain as this song plays out. He creates an interesting paradox by employing the lifeless electronic beats to act as the plentifully noisy bugs of the time, adding an interesting air to the piece. A distorted melody soon takes over once the introduction has set, adding the impression of chaos to the piece. I’ve heard music that’s meant to take you back to a simpler time. Never like this though. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

1 Feb 2016


Chad Miller: Lafawndah is in complete control of her presence. Just about as much control as she has over her situation. She sounds imbued with power as she sings “You don’t have a name / You don’t have a face” and “I’ll make you fall” over percussion that sounds like sparring weapons. It doesn’t sound angry just for the sake of being angry either as the opening line is “If you were willing to treat me right / I’d stand up by your side / Be down to burn me” which puts the rest of the song in interesting and ambiguous context, adding as much clarity as it removes. Musically the song is continuously exciting as well, particularly when she repeats her phrases in gorgeously jarring harmonies. Constantly interesting and musically engaging. An artist to watch for sure. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

1 Feb 2016


Photo: Nick Helderman

Chad Miller: Neat guitar driven background that repeats throughout the majority of the song. This brings a sort of anxious energy to the piece. Vocals and ornamentation from other instruments use it in different ways and accompany it with different notes so it doesn’t feel wholly monotonous. Vague lyrics like the repeated “Don’t tell” and the shape shifting repetitions make for a good introduction for Suun’s next album as it’ll leave you wanting more. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

1 Feb 2016


Photo: Sarah Cass

Chris Pittaway: This track is surprisingly tense and driving, given its flat, sneering delivery and not-particularly-varied instrumentation. Its retro-futuristic atmosphere and snarky political commentary demand multiple listens to reach their full effect, but when they do, it’s pretty darn chilling. [7/10]

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Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Love Stories in Video Games

// Moving Pixels

"This week we return the topic of how love, sex, and relationships are represented in video games.

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