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by PopMatters Staff

27 Aug 2015


Nathan Stevens: The pairing of Jamie xx and Talabot is an odd one, with xx obsessed with the more ethereal while Talabot completely works in the tactile. The combination works here though, thanks to Tabalot’s mutation of the original DNA. Now clocking in at over seven minutes, “Loud Places” turns into a marvelous slow burn that never bursts, but keeps smoldering over clanking percussion and slowly floating synths. It’s hard to compare it to the album version, as the brother tracks are completely different beats. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

27 Aug 2015


John Bergstrom: It’s characteristically pretty and heavy on atmosphere, with some nice dynamics too. But it doesn’t hold together as well as some of their previous efforts. The chorus, in particular, sounds clunky and plodding. Enough to whet the appetite for their upcoming third album, at least. [6/10]

by PopMatters Staff

27 Aug 2015


Matt James: There’s a cosy familiarity to Squeeze’s first single in too many years. It’s like bumping into an old school chum and deciding to go for “One cheeky pint” ‘cos you’re “Still crazy after all these years”. “Happy Days” feels authentically ‘Squeezey’ albeit one that’s a bit slower up the stairs these days ‘cos of the knees and gets to bed early ‘cos it’s got a busy day tomorrow. Sweet and summery enough, though one listen will ensure two subsequent events occur thereafter. One, you will immediately fire up Spotify, stick on “Cool for Cats”, “Up the Junction” and “Tempted” and sing along to the lines you remember whilst reminiscing your youthful scampery over a satisfying mug of herbal tea. Two, you will for the rest of said day be visited by visions of Arthur Fonzarelli and Ralph “Malph” whilst the vastly superior Happy Days theme tune bobs around your brainbox on an infinite loop. Just be prepared m’kay? [5/10]

by PopMatters Staff

27 Aug 2015


Matt James: In an age where pop appears to be, depressingly, enjoying rifling through the “Dumb & Dumber Idiot Box” we must cherish musicians like Julia Holter. She’s smart and strange. Listening to Ekstasis or Loud City Song makes you wanna go drown yourself in, well, “Art” even if you haven’t a clue what the hell it’s all about. The plink-plonk stomp of “Sea Calls Me Home” sounds like Holter trying to bottle the spirit of the Beach Boys’ “God Only Knows” whilst tickling the hallucinatory haze of a week’s insomnia. At one point you can possibly hear pink, tutu-wearing, cartoon elephants polishing their saxophones in the apartment above. There’s also an ace nonchalant whistly bit for all fans of “Ace Nonchalant Whistly Bits”. At a trim three minutes it’s a little slim perhaps and not as swoonsome a serenade as recent canine cuddler “Feel You” but with Holter’s exemplary track record it still feels safe to follow her into the dreamy depths. [7/10]

by Adrien Begrand

27 Aug 2015


Five years after the astounding album Penelope, the latest song cycle by composer Sarah Kirkland Snider takes its inspiration from the work of writer and artist Nathaniel Bellows, depicting a childhood upbringing in Massachusetts that veers between the beautiful, haunting, and surreal, where discoveries abound. Because that’s, in reality, what it’s actually like when you’re a kid.

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Ubisoft Understands the Art of the Climb

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"Ubisoft's Assassin's Creed and Grow Home epitomize the art of the climb.

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