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by PopMatters Staff

8 Sep 2010


New York’s Darlings formed a few years ago in the depths of Greenwich Village, with these four young pals slowly building word of mouth through house parties and local gigs. 2009 saw the release of Yeah I Know , which drew major praise from the likes of the New York Times, who called the band’s debut “a splash of lo-fi elegance”. Following up that success, Darlings are releasing a new EP, Warma, this fall via Famous Class Records and today we’re premiering “Big Girl”, a tune from the new EP.

by PopMatters Staff

8 Sep 2010


We loved the Bug’s 2009 project London Zoo, giving the album an 8 and placing it in our top 10 albums of the year. To celebrate the 20th anniversary of Ninja Tune Records, the Bug returns with this new tune and video.

   

by Timothy Gabriele

8 Sep 2010


Blackdown recently wrote in a column at Pitchfork about how LV is bringing the sounds of South Africa to dubstep.  This latest single from the Hyperdub label proves it to be so, as a blacklit invisible man dances in front of wall projecting a word you will hear ad nauseum in the infectious tune that accompanies it.

by Matt Mazur

3 Sep 2010


Should have won...Deborah Kerr in Black Narcissus.

Oscar’s Nominees
Joan Crawford ... Possessed
Susan Hayward ... Smash-Up, the Story of a Woman
Dorothy McGuire ... Gentleman’s Agreement
Rosalind Russell ... Mourning Becomes Electra
Loretta Young ... The Farmer’s Daughter

Mazur’s Nominees

Joan Crawford … Possessed

by Jason Cook

3 Sep 2010


Takashi Miike's Yatterman

If you know Takashi Miike at all, then you’re probably a good enough horror fan already. If you don’t know him then, as long as you like horror, body horror in particular, you’re missing out. Miike is like a Japanese Eli Roth, though he’s older, more varied and prolific, and often less sardonic. Eli Roth is a monument in current American Horror, triumphant mainly because of his “gore porn” contribution to the 2000s’ “Splat Pack” era, supplementing Saw’s economic revival of horror with Hostel, an instantly memorable assault on America’s fascination with sexual conquest in Europe.

Miike, like Roth, understands horror and where we are, in the Third World, on a dark and filmic level. He’s responsible for years of films worth your time and attention, often considers the same limits as Roth and other American body horror filmmakers, leading us through the lives of an experimentally distorted family in Visitor Q (2001); a flamboyant serial killer in Ichi the Killer (2001); and amid the Yakuza in a David Lynch-ian for 2003’s Gozu.

Miike is perhaps most well know for 1999’s Audition, but don’t skip is unaired episode of Showtime’s Masters of Horror series, “Imprint”.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Culture Belongs to the Alien in 'Spirits of Xanadu'

// Moving Pixels

"The symbols that the artifact in Spirits of Xanadu uses are esoteric -- at least for the average Western gamer. It is Chinese culture reflected back at us through the lens of alien understanding.

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