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by Paul Gregory Alms

21 Oct 2010


Green was a power pop band who put out a series of records in the ‘80s and ‘90s that was heavy on jangle heavy on rock and heavy on hook. The songs were really, really good but unfortunately the production sometimes lagged. They got very far beyond a few very dedicated fans. In the last few years their records are being rediscovered due to CD reissues on their own label, Gangreen Records.

Part of that rediscovery is this cover by Someone Still Loves You Boris Yeltsin and Telekinesis. “Gotta Get a Record Out” is a joyful celebration o ambition, a rousing invitation: “kids, get hip to this sound”. The two bands collaborate and put out a fresh take on a fun record.

For comparison’s sake and to give a taste of “Green”, here is the original from Green’s MySpace page.

Find more artists like GREEN at MySpace Music

by Sarah Zupko

21 Oct 2010


Toronto’s Bonjay create a kinetic blend of electro-soul, dancehall, and big beats that end up lodging in the brain as instant memories and the body as a means of motion motivation. Yeah, they make you wanna dance with abandon big time. That’s probably why Bonjay and director Sammy Rawal made two videos for “Stumble”, each with a different dancer choreographed by Dana Michel to represent a blend of dancehall and club styles. Hot stuff, both of them and we have the premiere of the one featuring Liana Lewis for you. Check out the alternate take with Addy Chan over on NOW.

Bonjay is the duo of Alanna Stuart on vocals and Ian “Pho” Swain behind the decks. They’ve been collaborating since 2006 and the hype is on the ascendant with the CBC tagging Bonjay as “one of the top 10 Canadian bands destined to break in 2010”. If “Stumble” is any indication, they are well on their way.

by J.C. Sciaccotta

21 Oct 2010


Twin Shadow has been garnering considerable attention in the press for his ‘80s New Wave-inspired sound. In anticipation of his full-length debut—Forget, out November 15 via Terrible Records (US) and 4AD (ROW)—he recently began a tour of the US, UK, and France.

Check out his Calvin Klein circa 1995-inspired video for “Slow”, below. Complete tour dates after the jump.

by Matt Mazur

20 Oct 2010


I’ve long been an admirer of Geena Davis, of her daring commitment to originality in a plastic business, of her sharp sense of humor, and of her formidable, MENSA-approved intellect.  Let us not forget that she was also one half of Thelma and Louise, one of the most iconic, brilliant pieces of feminist cinema of all time, and that she is a champion archer. And a working mother.

If there was any doubt that Davis could claim the credit of “hero” on her resume, than her current project, The Geena Davis Institute on Gender in Media, forever cements her reputation as a passionate crusader for women. According to the Institute’s official website (www.SeeJane.org)“six years ago, while watching children’s television programs and videos with her young daughter, Davis noticed a remarkable imbalance in the ratio of male to female characters. From that small starting point, Davis went on to raise funds for the largest research project ever undertaken on gender in children’s entertainment.”

Davis recently talked about her work with David Frost:

by Timothy Gabriele

20 Oct 2010


A look under the microscope reveals an oddly beautiful array of 8mm found footage of swimmy little shadows and dissipating neon-dyed chromosomal helixes. Grubby Little Hands is a Philadelphia-based band that sounds like at times like a more ramshackle Elephant Six band, with a folky bent that’s not so much freaked as is pleasantly somnambulant or whimsically lazy. “Twelve Tones, Two Windows” finds them at their drowsiest, barely able to whisper the lulling tones above the sweet chiming backdrop. But that makes it wonderful music to pass out to, a last fizzle from the campfire embers as the night winds down.

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