Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

16 Jan 2017


Paul Carr: This is an artifact from the origins of punk that still sounds as vital and alive as it did then. The song is a powerful, spit and vinegar, aural assault, full of genuine working class angst. Chords are torn and shredded with the words hurtling past at a furious pace. A testament to the powers of youth, yet as important now as it ever has been. This is punk. Nothing held back. No thought of tomorrow. No pauses. No rest. No future. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

13 Jan 2017


Photo: Jen Rosenstein

Los Angeles’ pop artist MILCK (a.k.a. Connie Lim) started out playing the pop game and trying to conform to gender and racial stereotypes, but’s she too smart and creative to have kept that up for long. Renaming herself MILCK, she cast off the expectations of others and decided to focus on developing her unique voice. In doing so, MILCK has become an artist to watch for her truth to power approach to her new music.

by PopMatters Staff

13 Jan 2017


Paul Carr: Over rudimentary beats and the barest of bass lines, Sleaford Mods address the collapse of one of the UK’s oldest and most famous department store chains. Rather than a furious protest anthem for the 99% or a rousing anthem against the fat cats that get rich at the expense of the little man, it is delivered as a pithy statement of fact. A tacit acknowledgment that there is no fairness in society and the rich man is, inevitably always going to win, leaving the vultures to pick over the carcasses they leave behind. Moreover, the band maintains their ability to describe the grubby mundanity of everyday British life. There is no grandeur or attempt to explore life’s big questions. No real stylistic “growth”. This is what Sleaford Mods do, and it is what it is. Just don’t come looking for answers. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

12 Jan 2017


Photo: Danny Clinch

Adriane Pontecorvo: Valerie June brings us a gospel that speaks in tongues and gets down and dirty on “Shakedown”. A bluesy twang gives her folk sounds grit while June sings up a storm and unfettered keyboards rock without getting slick. If you’re not catching serious spirit, listen again and again and again: the simplicity is catching, and one listen isn’t enough. This is music that wakes the whole body, with knee slaps and hand claps all implied. This is a song made to shake the sins from your skin and your skin from your bones, and it’s got some heavy grooves. [8/10]

by Imran Khan

22 Dec 2016


Known for her art-rock compositions with Goya Dress and the more straightforward pop songwriting of her solo career, Shetland-born Astrid Williamson returns to the classical musical training of her formative years to present Requiem and Gallipoli. A ten-piece set of orchestral compositions written by Williamson herself, Requiem and Gallipoli is a crystalline example of the songwriter’s talents as a composer.

Her work with the atmospheric and dramatic alternative rock outfit Goya Dress established Williamson’s skill in combining the storms of pop-rock structures with the understated and moody arrangements of a string section. The artist further expressed classical designs in her follow-up solo work, always within a pop context.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Moving Pixels Podcast: The Best Games of 2016

// Moving Pixels

"The Moving Pixels Podcast counts down our top five games of 2016.

READ the article