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by PopMatters Staff

3 May 2016


Pryor Stroud: Egyptian Lover was a perpetual staple of the L.A. dance scene in the early and mid-‘80s, and “I Cry (Night After Night)” demonstrates why he captured this subcultural imagination with such force. Gilded with a twirling, nocturnal synth-bass motif and vocoded back-up singers, the whole track smacks of the multi-genre pop savvy and creative eccentricity of Prince, yet still emphatically radiates the uniqueness of Egyptian Lover’s personal aesthetic. He asks you, just as Prince once did, to dig a picture that he paints before you: he is the lover from “When Doves Cry”—“How can you just leave me standing / Alone in a world that’s so cold?”—but this lover now walks the desolate streets of this world without direction, a world that is ice-cold solely for him, and cries endlessly for a lover that isn’t there, his teardrops now rivulets of ice on his cheeks. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

2 May 2016


Emmanuel Elone: Let’s get this out of the way; Run the Jewels 2 was one of the best albums of 2014, and “Love Again” was one of the best songs from that album. You really can’t go wrong with Run the Jewels. Killer Mike brings his southern-tinged lyricism to the table once more, this time talking about coitus. This continues on El-P’s verse, but becomes much more interesting when Gangsta Boo mirrors Mike’s verse by talking about intercourse from a woman’s perspective. In fact, her feature is so fantastically vulgar and pimp that it nearly overshadows Mike’s and El-P’s, which is not an easy feat. Production-wise, all you need to know is that it is an El-P instrumental, like all Run the Jewels songs. If there’s any flaw in the track, it’s that El-P’s verse isn’t as great as Mike’s or Boo’s, but it’s still as over-the-top and enthralling. Put simply, Run the Jewels is one of the best hip-hop groups of the 2010s, and “Love Again” is one of their best songs yet. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Evolving from a cinematic skyscape to a piston-pumping house anthem, “Born Slippy” remains one of Underworld’s most mesmerizing and uplifting slices of electronica. Its effortless amalgamation of varying components—incantatory chanting, echoing synth pulses, thump-thump-thump drum machine programming—has since served as a template for countless producers working in a similar mode. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Pounding, repetitive, and replete with an unwavering sonic concentration, “Die Schallplatte” takes the most basic elements of Kraftwerkian synthpop and integrates them into a strobe light-mimicking exercise in dancefloor hypnosis. The six-note-then-seven-note synth riff that anchors the track is particularly well-executed; its caustic, fizzling texture brings to mind a bio-mechanical attempt to animate a dying organism - you or, perhaps, something more sinister - through a dangerously high electrical charge. [7/10]

by PopMatters Staff

28 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: “For What It’s Worth” is an atmospheric R&B slow jam that seems to be on the verge of a self-destructive nervous breakdown; both vocalists, in a mere moment or two, could succumb to an onslaught of uncontrollable weeping, and the beat—a network of noxiously woozy bass and high-reverb electro blips—likewise could bottom-out at any second and strand these vocalists in the very psychic emptiness that they seem to be combatting. All-in-all, the track’s take on downcast, pseudo-sung hip-hop is nothing you couldn’t get from a throwaway Drake song, but its acute sense of sonic melancholy is deserving of multiple listens. [6/10]

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