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by Will Rivitz

20 Jul 2016


Evening Bell make hard-nosed country with a classic-rock kick, male and female vocals sharing the spotlight under a haze of piano and guitar. “Dead End Friends & Fair Weather Lovers” is all Spaghetti Western, dust swirling around distorted amps and muted slide guitar. It’s a morose song, complaining about misguided romance under honky-tonk piano and splashy drums. It could have come out in the ‘70s, and it could have come out in the early aughts, but its roots-rockin’ sound will always be welcome.

by Will Rivitz

20 Jul 2016


Be Calm Honcho‘s “Kid Go Hard” is a jangly splash of indie pop, cascading forth on waves of guitar and piano. It’s steady, metered; a whimsical yet deeply grounded track. There are the airy verses, floating on high synths, but they nosedive into stomping drums and handclaps as the chorus begins to roar and the guitars begin to wail. The song flows freely and yet is rhythmically precise all at once, a trick of the light that makes it freer or more solid than you might expect. The fact that I can’t tell which way the trick is leaning is a positive for the song, proof of its songwriting excellence.

by Will Rivitz

19 Jul 2016


The Jezabels have rightfully broken through into the pop-rock elite, especially on the strength of this year’s excellent Synthia. “Smile” is proof that their position is warranted, flowing from a deceptive soft rock intro to a chorus that strikes with the force of a gale. It’s latently ferocious, waiting until just the right moment to bite with swirling guitars and crashing percussion operating under lead singer Hayley Mary’s misanthropic howl. The song’s wandering ethos fits in well with the video, featuring Mary’s best “Bittersweet Symphony” impression: she wanders from place to place, not settling down for even a moment, while relishing the music behind her.

by Will Rivitz

19 Jul 2016


Elizabeth Hunter‘s “Coming for You” is impressive in just how much it does right. There’s the instrumental, a Motown-influenced slammer with butter-smooth horns and luscious organ. There’s the vocal, a killer case of blue-eyed soul drawing heavily from Amy Winehouse’s days with Mark Ronson and suave harmonizing up the wazoo. Most importantly, though, Hunter struts forward with blinding energy, loud and dynamic and alive. It’ll truly be a shame if “Coming for You” doesn’t break through, since I haven’t heard a song that’s quite so sure to get people up and dancing in a while.

by PopMatters Staff

18 Jul 2016


Pryor Stroud: Taken from Mvula’s latest release The Dreaming Room, “Show Me Love” is an incantatory, gospel-tinged art-pop hymnal that drifts from moments of deep personal introspection to fissions of out-of-body spiritual awareness. The climactic eruption of orchestration is startling in its intensity; over it, Mvula repeats the title phrase over and over and over again, trying to stretch it out, to discover its true contents and phonetic subtleties, and to discern if expressing her love in the exact right way—“You show me love / You show me love / You show me love”—can somehow approximate the true feeling it gives her. [8/10]

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The Moving Pixels Podcast Battles the 'Jotun'

// Moving Pixels

"This week we discuss Jotun's presentation of Norse mythology through scale and grandeur.

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