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by PopMatters Staff

23 Aug 2016


Photo: Shervin Lainez

New York’s Hollis Brown is masterful in their approach to American roots music, with the band drawing from rock ‘n’ roll, soul, country, and a bit of blues. Hollis Brown inhabits these musical forms with a surprising degree of naturalness given their youth and they look to become a seminal figure in the thriving and growing Americana scene. The band’s latest release, Cluster of Pearls, released last Record Store Day and now they have a brand new single to share, the uber soulful, deeply moving “Don’t Want to Miss You”, which channels some Otis Redding and Gram Parsons, as well as the heartbreak from a painful breakup.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Aug 2016


Photo: Jay Sansone

Eric Krasno has been a prolific musician over the past 20 years, co-founding both Soulive and Lettuce, while playing, producing and songwriting for a host of the music world’s leading lights, such as Tedeschi Trucks, Talib Kweli, Norah Jones and more. Stepping out on his own has allowed the virtuosic guitar master to quite literally find his own voice as he takes the mic for the first time revealing an affecting, gentle, bluesy soul man. On his latest single, “Jezebel”, Krasno lays out a mellow soul/blues vibe with some slinky, masterful guitar playing and a tale of love gone wrong.

by PopMatters Staff

23 Aug 2016


Chicago’s post-punk darlings Radar Eyes are back with more jangly, percussive, hard-charging music as their latest album Radiant Remains nears its September 2nd release date. “Midnight Drive” will thrill fans of the Cure, Echo & the Bunnymen, and Joy Division. The band may call the Windy City home, but ‘80s British rock remains their greatest inspiration and the beautiful thing is that Radar Eyes’s music feels completely organic and possessed of kinetic energy. In other words, this isn’t tribute music to a bygone era; “Midnight Drive” is thoroughly of the present.

by PopMatters Staff

22 Aug 2016


Tanner Smith: Two nocturnal 1990s icons team up for a spare, cinematic ballad that offers no surprises. “The Spoils” is immaculately constructed, featuring an understated, plaintive vocal performance from Hope Sandoval (who fronts the spectral Mazzy Star) and rich granular details that come from years of making records. The song’s beautiful, string-laden chorus feels like a sad, distant, and dying callback to the group’s incredible Blue Lines classic “Unfinished Sympathy”. But where “Unfinished Sympathy” captured the ambiguous rush of love, “The Spoils” details its fall into the abyss. “The Spoils” classicist leanings prove that Massive Attack don’t need to chase fads in order to create stirring and uniquely powerful music. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

22 Aug 2016


Chris Ingalls: Like that unwieldy parachute Katy Perry is dragging around in the video, the song is bloated and heavy-handed, but it’s kind of hard to get too jaded about something that’s basically the unofficial theme song of the Rio athletes. In that sense, the song works nicely and all the proper “inspirational” boxes are checked, both in the composition, Perry’s emotional delivery, and yes, that “you can do it!” video. [7/10]

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Best of the Moving Pixels Podcast: Further Explorations of the Zero

// Moving Pixels

"We continue our discussion of the early episodes of Kentucky Route Zero by focusing on its third act.

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