Latest Blog Posts

by PopMatters Staff

10 Feb 2016


Sam Taylor: Let’s be clear, Beyoncé‘s greatest asset has always been her voice. On “Formation”, she might not be belting out another insta-classic like “Crazy in Love”, but she continues down an increasingly dark and enthralling path, stripping back her sound and redefining what makes ‘Beyoncé’ so distinctively… well, Beyoncé. Utilising the unique potential of the surprise release—and the Super Bowl—to whip the Internet into a frenzy, she’s using her stature in the industry (and the black community) to expose an army of fans to something truly new. On both “Formation” and in its accompanying video, Beyoncé retains the confident swagger of her eponymous 2014 album, harnessing this progression to produce a track that not only serves as a potent statement that #blacklivesmatter in 2016, but that good music does too… and it still has the potential to really get people talking. [8/10]

by Sarah Zupko

10 Feb 2016


Atlanta producer Chris Hunt previously applied his compositional skills to the work of Cloudeater, but following the break-up of that outfit, Hunt has struck out on his own in developing the Tomb project. Juxtaposing wide cinematic flourishes with elements of jaggy noise that almost create a heavy metal effect, his new music is throughly visceral in some of the same ways as Rabit’s recent music on Communion.

by PopMatters Staff

9 Feb 2016


Jedd: Beaudoin: Helloooo. Where did this come from? Love it. It’s got that (forgive me) Kate Bush/Peter Gabriel thing happening for it while also having its own character. Coming back to this one again and again. [9/10]

by PopMatters Staff

9 Feb 2016


Stephen Wyatt: PUP’s anonymity will be short lived. They write anthems and odes the perils of puberty and the abyss of adulthood, and “DVP” is no different. Holding onto hardcore music’s finer elements—frenetic guitar work, drums peaking at the end of an amphetamine rush, and the admixture of screaming diatribes (“I need to grow up!”) and surfer melodies—PUP primes themselves for a future that would benefit for a revival in hardcore music. [8/10]

by Danilo Bortoli

9 Feb 2016


Piano music, even considering the neoclassical movement that sprouted (briefly) during the beginning of the last decade, is still regarded as a formalist type of art. It’s rare to see artists in the mainstream and even in the blogosphere break through the model. When such event takes place, we end up getting Max Richter‘s deeply rooted Romanticism or Nils Frahm‘s more agitated experiments.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Violin Virtuoso L. Subramaniam Mesmerizes in Rare New York Performance (Photos)

// Notes from the Road

"Co-presented by the World Music Institute, the 92Y hosted a rare and mesmerizing performance from India's violin virtuoso L. Subramaniam.

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