Latest Blog Posts

by Sarah Zupko

20 Jan 2011

Tel Aviv’s Eatliz play a classic brand of atmospheric indie rock that has fueled great popularity in their Israeli homeland, as their debut LP Violently Delicate was a popular fave in 2008 on radio there. That success translated to an invitation to 2008’s Popkomm in Germany and a release of their album there as well as in Austria and Switzerland. Further exposure through MTV has moved the band up the ladder and, in 2011, they will be making their SXSW debut. Eatliz’s sound encompasses a satifyingly broad range of influences such as Portishead, the Concretes, Mr. Bungle and Björk. The new animated video for “Lose This Child” was created by the team of Yuval & Merav Nathan, who directed the massive viral sensation (more than 16 million YouTube views!) that was Oren Lavie’s “Her Morning Elegance”. The brooding mood and simple imagery of animated turtles crawling across a deserted nighttime beach ideally suits the song’s essential melancholy. Eatliz’s upcoming album, Teasing Nature, will release this summer.

by Eric Allen Been

20 Jan 2011

The Nymphs

Drummer Alex Kirst, who played in the glam rock group the Nymphs and with Iggy Pop’s backing band the Trolls, was killed on Jan. 13 from a hit-and-run car crash in Cathedral City, Calif., according to the Associated Press.

Kirst, who was 47, was walking along a desert road when he was struck by the vehicle. The AP is reporting that local investigators say there was no evidence that the driver of the car even attempted to brake before striking Kirst.

The Nymphs peaked in the late 1980s and early 1990s but prematurely disbanded after releasing only one album in 1990 on Geffen Records. Kirst, along with his brother Whitey Kirst and Pete Marshal, went on to play as the Trolls on Iggy Pop’s solo albums Beat ‘Em Up (2001) and Skull Ring (2003).


by Sarah Zupko

19 Jan 2011

100 Lovers
Releasing: 1 March (US)

Denver’s DeVotchKa trekked out to the Arizona desert and its atmospheric environs to record their fifth album with producer Craig Schumacher, who has previously worked with Calexico and Neko Case. Not surprisingly members of Calexico appear on 100 Lovers as the two bands have always been rather sympatico aesthetic-wise. The band’s expansive sound seems straight out of film and so it’s a logical outgrowth of frontman Nick Urata’s musical progression that he’s been busy in recent years with soundtrack work, including recent efforts on Little Miss Sunshine and I Love You Phillip Morris.

01 “The Alley”
02 “All the Sand in All the sea”
03 “One Hundered Other Lovers”
04 “The Common Good”
05 “Interlude 1″
06 “The Man From San Sebastian”
07 “Exhaustible”
08 “Interlude 2″
09 “Bad Luck Heels”
10 “Ruthless”
11 “Contrabanda”
12 “Sunshine”

by Joseph Fisher

19 Jan 2011

Best Coast have spent the better part of the past year playing up their feline and pot fixations to the joy of many and to the irritation of, well, many. For the band’s fans, the video premiere for the track “Crazy for You” over at I Can Has Cheezburger will likely make Cosentino and company all the more precious. For the band’s detractors, the video will likely make Cosentino and company much more annoying. No matter, though. Cats are cute. They like catnip. That kitty director could probably use some. What more needs to be said?

by Steve Horowitz

19 Jan 2011

Remembering the innocence of youth can often more be pleasant than the original experience of actually being young and naïve. That’s why looking at old photographs can be more fun than what the experience of what one was really doing when the picture was snapped. This act serves as a metaphor for the sweet, sweet music of Allo Darlin’. They grab hold of the dulcet sentiments of life with a youthful exuberance while at the same time wryly capture the wisdom of someone who is older than that now looking back—but without the cynicism that pervades so much of pop these days. Their “Polaroid Song” works as a meta-commentary as it explicitly refers to an out of date technology used to ensnare the present, complete with what their Australian antecedents the Go-Betweens called “that striped sunlight sound”—full of jangly guitars, bouncy rhythms, and a general happiness. Director Jun keung Cheung’s video provides the song with a movie soundtrack—specifically referencing John Hughes’ Breakfast Club in a Be Kind Rewind manner. It’s goofy, in the best possible way, like the way the characters in the movie were. It fits the song in a fun way, and the song itself bears repeated listening in the way one watches old movies that are close to the heart.

//Mixed media

Tricks or Treats? Ten Halloween Blu-rays That May Disrupt Your Life

// Short Ends and Leader

"The best of this stuff'll kill you.

READ the article