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by PopMatters Staff

27 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: The latest release from the Kills’ upcoming Ash & Ice LP, “Heart of a Dog” is a chugging roots-punk stomper that showcases Alison Mosshart’s charred, vindictive, and cyanide-laced vocal acuities. Lyrically, the song refashions the Stooges’ “I Wanna Be Your Dog” to highlight a female protagonist, a protagonist that, while re-gendered, still desires with an animalistic intensity: “I’m loyal / I’m loyal / I got the heart of a dog,” Mosshart belts, and you can imagine her crawling on all fours, frothing at the mouth, baring her teeth, just like Iggy’s anti-hero, but here there’s an even greater sense of unease. Once unchained, what is this dog capable of? [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

27 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: Departing from her Joni Mitchell-influenced acoustic folk persona, Beth Orton adopts the synth-centric instrumentation and airy melodic sensibility of ‘80s pop on “1973”, and the result is something close to bliss: a coruscating, light-as-air, psychedelia-tinged nostalgia trip that updates Orton’s sound without compromising her immaculate storytelling prowess. “Swimming in your mind / Swimming in my mind / Swimming in my mind with electric sky,” she sings, offering a perfect lyric embodiment of the song as a whole—which to say, listening to “1973” is like performing a freestyle stroke through the divergent rivers of your memory and remembering, in effect, all the former lovers whose memories you used to swim through as well. [8/10]

by PopMatters Staff

26 Apr 2016


Emmanuel Elone: Bas’ recent album, Too High to Riot, is a decent, laid back hip-hop album, and “Matches” is a prime example of that. English group the Hics lay down a chill, cloud rap beat with some nice vocals on the chorus, and Bas does a good job on the verses. Sonically, “Matches” is a great song. It’s issue, though, lies in Bas himself; while he’s not a bad lyricist, nothing about his verses are exceptional. There’s also the fact that, as a Dreamville artist, he takes his emceeing cues from J. Cole far too often, and sounds more like a copycat than an artist in his own right. Still, “Matches” is a great sounding, inoffensive hip-hop song, even if Bas wears his influences on his sleeve a bit too much. [6/10]

by PopMatters Staff

26 Apr 2016


Austin’s funky duo of Anthony Farrell and Andrew Trube—aka Greyhounds—have their sophomore album Change of Pace releasing this Friday. The group’s psychedelic soul is a potent and eclectic mix. The cultural and political battlegrounds of America are very much the central preoccupation of this new record. Farrell says, “There’s this polarization of American culture where you’re either on our side or you’re against us, and I don’t think that really helps anybody.”

by PopMatters Staff

26 Apr 2016


Pryor Stroud: French goth-electro artist Kangding Ray weaves sonic tapestries out of encrypted shadow-codes—little pockets of dead and actively dying light—that remain defiantly opaque to interpretation yet still seem to telegraph a range of lurid secrets. In “Brume”, Ray augments an industrial rock throb with synth washes that seem to wander blindly out of the track’s pitch-black corners, creating a sense of subterranean space that seems to get smaller and smaller as the seconds tick by. Some steam-engine machine grinds away in the background; stray electrical wires seems to convulse across the track’s bed, shooting sparks storms and inspiring an omnipresent sense of fear. “Brume”, in sum, sounds like it is set in a horror-movie basement lab where unnameable surgical implements, strange chemicals, and sealed-off freezers line the walls. [7/10]

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Supernatural: Season 11, Episode 19 - "The Chitters"

// Channel Surfing

"Another stand-alone episode, but there's still plenty to discuss in the Supernatural world.

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