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by Cynthia Fuchs

23 Mar 2011


“I can’t say that I wanted to be like everyone else,” says Lyubov Meyerson, drawing on her cigarette. “That’s not quite how it was. I simply was like everyone else.” Meyerson’s is one of five Russian classmates’ stories in Robin Hessman’s terrific documentary, My Perestroika. Each recalls what it was like to be born into Soviet-era Communism, and now contemplates middle age in Russia’s new market economy. Through thoughtful and absorbing interviews, the film shows the perpetual disjunctions between official history and lived experiences.

My Perestroika opens in New York 23 March and Los Angeles 15 April. Many other cities will follow.

See PopMattersreview.

by PopMatters Staff

22 Mar 2011


Photo: Laura Ramsey

Canada’s Timber Timbre have been peddling their unique blend of noirish, cinematic roots music since 2005 and the band’s 2009 self-titled album was honored by being long listed for the prestigious Polaris Music Prize. This April the trio of Taylor Kirk, Mika Posen and Simon Trottier are offering up their fourth album, Creep On Creepin’ On, which continues to blend their influences from a wide variety of sounds. Kirk says, “The idea is to make music we love and therefore embrace the risk of sounding like all the music we’ve ever loved, all at once.” “Woman” is the record’s first single and the video is something of a 1920s-style, silent movie homage with flickering credits and camera movements and techniques reminiscent of early film. It’s an intriguing approach for a haunting song, the historic aesthetic making the song seem ever more poignant. The band will be touring the upcoming release and you can find the dates after the jump.

by Cynthia Fuchs

22 Mar 2011


Craig Ewert is dying. And as he explains in John Zaritzky’s documentary, originally made in 2007 and re-airing on Frontline 22 March at 9pm, as well as online, he wants to feel some measure of control over the process. Thus he and his wife Mary have come to Dignitas, “one of a handful of Swiss groups devoted to helping people end their lives legally.” As Craig puts it, “ “I’m tired of the disease, but I’m not tired of living. And I still enjoy it enough that I’d like to continue. But the thing is, that I really can’t.” He must be the one, legally, to commit the act: he must drink the liquid that will end his life, and agree to be taped doing so. The film tapes the taping, as well as the couple’s loving farewell. Craig’s final moments are rendered in a series of close-ups and dissolves, under the Beethoven movement he has asked to hear. While assisted suicide raises profound questions concerning both risks and benefits, the potential for abuses versus respect for individual rights, needs, and desires, The Suicide Tourist doesn’t engage in these debates. Instead, it observes the Ewerts as they go through this complicated journey.

See PopMattersreview.

by Benjamin Aspray

21 Mar 2011


If a beat drops in the middle of a forest, does it make a sound? Remy LBO wanted to find out, so he left the lusher tools he used for last spring’s Peeling in the Dub back in LA and shacked up in the Oregon wilderness for a spell. There, with only a handful of instruments, he assembled a laid-back groove album in the spare, dry style of skweee—or Flying Lotus, but much, much looser. That album, Umpqua Fire, presumably named after the forest of its making, is streaming at his website, where it can also be purchased digitally or as an attractive, hand-screened LP.

  05.Snow Bird by RemyLBO

by PopMatters Staff

21 Mar 2011


Sweden’s Acid House Kings have a new album, Music Sounds Better With You, releasing this week. Look for our review in a few days, but check out the band’s new video in the meantime.

//Mixed media
//Blogs

Smudge and Jury: The Punk-Noir Pulp of 'I, The Jury'

// Short Ends and Leader

"With all the roughneck charm of a '40 pulp novel and much style to spare, I, The Jury is a good, popcorn-filling yarn.

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